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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Arpita Mukherjee, Divya Satija, Tanu M. Goyal, Murali K. Mantrala and Shaoming Zou

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess Indian consumers' brand consciousness by examining their brand knowledge, purchase behaviour and perceptions of foreign brands. It provides key inputs for global retailers to harness the potential in growing consumerism in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 300 Indian consumers was conducted and the data were analysed using descriptive and simple regression techniques.

Findings

The study found that brand purchase in India varies across product categories. At present, consumer knowledge and use of foreign brands is low, and Indian consumers are price‐sensitive. Indian consumers are experimenting with brands and would like more foreign brands to enter the Indian market.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample size, advanced econometrics techniques could not be used to analyse the dataset.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to assess the impact of retail liberalisation on Indian consumers' shopping behaviour, particularly their brand consciousness.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2022

H. Kent Baker, Sujata Kapoor and Tanu Khare

Financial professionals are increasingly important in the Indian financial system. Our study examines the association between the Big Five personality traits and Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial professionals are increasingly important in the Indian financial system. Our study examines the association between the Big Five personality traits and Indian financial professionals' behavioral biases when making investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

After testing our questionnaire's reliability and validity, we used it to obtain the sample responses. We used multiple regression analysis and other statistical tools to identify the relationships between the Big Five personality traits and behavioral biases.

Findings

Our findings reveal a high level of extraversion and conscientiousness, a moderate level of agreeableness and openness and a low neuroticism level among financial professionals. The results show a significant association between neuroticism, extraversion, openness and all behavioral biases except anchoring bias. The neuroticism trait has a statistically significant relationship with all behavioral biases examined, whereas agreeableness and conscientiousness traits lack a significant association with behavioral biases. The openness trait is associated with many emotional biases and cognitive heuristics, while the extraversion trait has a significantly positive relationship with availability bias.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers could analyze primary (survey) and secondary investor data from brokerage houses. Using a larger sample could provide more generalizable findings. Researchers could also consider other aspects of investment decision-making using various asset classes. Understanding financial professionals' personality traits and behavioral biases could help them develop strategies to suit client needs.

Originality/value

This study provides the first comprehensive examination of the association between personality traits and behavioral biases of Indian financial professionals.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Tanu Shukla, Gajendra Singh Chauhan and Saumya

Marginalization of women in STEM sectors is a widely discussed trend that has percolated into the corporate sector. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that…

Abstract

Purpose

Marginalization of women in STEM sectors is a widely discussed trend that has percolated into the corporate sector. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that act as barriers to entry to female entrepreneurs and to understand the impact of these factors in the context of startup landscape. The scope of this paper covers chiefly first-generation entrepreneurs while elaborating the presence of the Lucite ceiling effect. It aims to categorize and elucidate the responsible variables while developing a model for the same.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is an exploratory study that provides a complex picture of how female entrepreneurs understand and experience the work culture at their workplace. The population under consideration is “urban startups”; these have been characterized as technology/non-technology-based and non-agricultural in nature. The sample in the study consists of male and female entrepreneurs of first-generation entrepreneurs belonging to the urban middle class and either founders or co-founders. The exploration presents a groundbreaking examination based on narrative inquiry and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The research led to distinct findings that can be utilized to improve the condition of female entrepreneurs and encourage their involvement in the ecosystem. The model is proposed on the basis of extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which lead to the Lucite ceiling phenomenon. The causes ranging from family pressure to fulfilling relevant requirements such as financing the venture were classified under these. Ultimately, inferences were drawn as to how these may be affecting the growth of women in the sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The identified intrinsic and extrinsic factors have been detailed, presenting further opportunities to focus on specific metrics by the stakeholders, namely, the policy-makers and the entrepreneur community. The study has been limited to urban startups to allow for convenience sampling, which is justified considering the issues highlighted in the existing knowledge. While this study has been carried out in the context of urban startups, it leaves scope for extension and extrapolation of the presented model in the rural context.

Practical implications

The study presents a formally structured representation of the issues faced by female entrepreneurs in a manner which is mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive. Such a categorization can, in the contemporary times, enable targeted mitigation of the same through well-planned policy initiatives and legislation. In addition, it provides a strong baseline for extensive quantitative research in this field, especially in the context of emerging economies in fast-developing nations.

Originality/value

The framework helps lay a groundwork for thoughtful research on women’s entrepreneurship. The Lucite ceiling phenomenon is a more aggravated version of the “glass ceiling”. The reasons for the prevalence of this effect in this context have not been explored before, thus providing a great scope to be further investigated.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Ernest Yaw Tweneboah-Koduah, Matilda Adams, Michael Nana Amoakoh and Stephen Mahamah Braimah

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour through the theoretical lens of self-determination theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour through the theoretical lens of self-determination theory (SDT). Specifically, the paper examines the influence of autonomy, competence and relatedness on individuals’ self-determined motivation for flood disaster mitigation. The study also examines whether self-determined motivation influences individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a cross-sectional survey design, the study used a quantitative research approach for data collection and analyses. Specifically, data was analysed using the structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

The result of this study revealed that competence was the strongest predictor of self-determined motivation, followed by autonomy. The result further shows that self-determined motivation positively influences individual’s adoption of flood mitigation behaviour. However, the results showed that relatedness does not predict self-determined motivation for flood disaster mitigation.

Practical implications

To enhance the effectiveness of flood disaster mitigation social marketing campaigns, the SDT psychological needs constructs (particularly, competence and autonomy) can aid in assessing the motivation of the target population towards adopting mitigation behaviours. An assessment of motivation will help understand perception of flood risk and behavioural evaluation. The consideration of autonomy and competence on motivation will aid in developing effective campaigns to satisfy the needs of the target population.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the limited research that used SDT to understand a social marketing phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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