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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Tanja Webs and Heinz Günter Holtappels

Teacher collaboration is regarded as a central feature of school quality that promotes students’ learning processes, teachers’ professional development, and school…

Abstract

Purpose

Teacher collaboration is regarded as a central feature of school quality that promotes students’ learning processes, teachers’ professional development, and school improvement. Although the phenomenon is complex, studies often use global constructs and measures. To meet the research demands, the purpose of this paper is to take a differentiated perspective on teacher collaboration, its particular school conditions and effects on instructional development.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of 1,105 teachers at 36 secondary schools in North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Using multivariate analysis of variance and structural equation modeling, the occurrence of three different forms of teacher collaboration and their relations to activities of instructional development, structural and cultural working conditions, represented by appropriate scales and indexes, are analyzed.

Findings

The results show that teachers use less resource-intensive forms of collaboration more often and practice more demanding forms of collaboration less frequently. More demanding forms of collaboration not only depend on the working climate but also on individual self-efficacy, institutionalized teams, collaborative and instructional principal leadership and in turn promote the development of interdisciplinary curricula and concepts for individual support.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence for the importance of distinguishing different forms of teacher collaboration. Furthermore, by relating different collaborative activities of teachers to certain school conditions and instructional development, this study makes a contribution to research by emphasizing the relativity of teacher collaboration regarding its desired outcomes as well as its necessary requirements.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Sanjica Faletar

This conference report of the 2005 LIDA Conference captures the varied presentations by speakers from the USA, Europe and the Baltic States.

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968

Abstract

Purpose

This conference report of the 2005 LIDA Conference captures the varied presentations by speakers from the USA, Europe and the Baltic States.

Design/methodology/approach

Digital libraries are in a maturing state and different developments were shared and examples of projects were given.

Findings

This is an annual meeting in this region of the world that brings a talented list of speakers from North America and Europe.

Research limitations/implications

Small conference.

Practical implications

This is a focused conference that has proven itself over time to attract excellent keynote speakers that come to this part of the world to share expertise and ideas.

Originality/value

This conference attracts major prominent speakers so the themes are important and well documented. The annual themes lend to many subthemes such as user evaluation, usability, digital reference, and other new digital applications.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

Shirley Coyle, Fernando Benito-Lopez, Tanja Radu, King-Tong Lau and Dermot Diamond

Wearable sensors can be used to monitor many interesting parameters about the wearer’s physiology and environment, with important applications in personal health and…

Abstract

Wearable sensors can be used to monitor many interesting parameters about the wearer’s physiology and environment, with important applications in personal health and well-being, sports performance and personal safety. Wearable chemical sensors can monitor the status of the wearer by accessing body fluids, such as sweat, in an unobtrusive manner. They can also be used to protect the wearer from hazards in the environment by sampling potentially harmful gas emissions, such as carbon monoxide. Integrating chemical sensors into textile structures is a challenging and complex task. Issues which must be considered include sample collection, calibration, waste handling, fouling and reliability. Sensors must also be durable and comfortable to wear. Here, we present examples of wearable chemical sensors that monitor the person and also his/her environment. We also discuss the issues involved in developing wearable chemical sensors and strategies for sensor design and textile integration.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Mirna Willer, Tanja Buzina, Karolina Holub, Jasenka Zajec, Miroslav Milinović and Nebojša Topolščak

The purpose of this paper is to assess costs in the National and University Library of Croatia for processing Croatian web resources and the maintenance and development of…

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2572

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess costs in the National and University Library of Croatia for processing Croatian web resources and the maintenance and development of the service, and to analyse the present organisation and workflow of their processing, and to propose improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment period was two months, during which the members of staff involved minutely monitored their tasks. The results were compared to the same exercise reported by the National Library of Australia and processing costs of cataloguing Croatian print publications.

Findings

The bottom‐up analysis of processing web resources shows that a balanced description of tasks and their distribution over staff members was established, and that the present workflow meets the requirements of efficient processing of web resources. As a general finding, approximately the same time was spent on archiving new items, as on the control and maintenance of the already archived ones due to the change of web resource properties, URL instability and the changes of technology. The comparative analysis showed: less time is spent on identification and selection and publishers' contacts on the part of the Croatian National Library compared to the Australian one; almost twice as much time was spent on gathering, quality assurance, and archiving instances in the Australian case than in the Croatian one; practically the same time was spent on cataloguing in both cases; and compared to cataloguing of print publications, significantly less time was spent on the print ones.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the two published articles on the in depth analysis of the workflow and processing costs of managing and selectively archiving legal deposit copies of web resources in a national library. Its potential value is in drawing attention of library managers of those institutions that deal with selective web archiving to assess costs and services in view of the legal obligations of libraries for preserving national cultural web heritage and meeting present and future users' needs.

Details

Program, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Tanja Merčun and Maja Žumer

The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission…

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3703

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission of developing the next generation catalogues and how they compare to new tools such as Amazon.

Deign/methodology/approach

An expert study was carried out in January 2008 to evaluate six library catalogues (one traditional and five recently modernised) and compare them to Amazon.

Findings

While the traditional catalogue has stayed far behind, the modernised catalogues have taken two different approaches in becoming the “next generation catalogue”. Two catalogues focused on improving functionality while two others decided to introduce Web/Library 2.0 trends first. At this point, none of the catalogues offer as vast a range of features as Amazon does, but one catalogue managed to surpass Amazon in some of the examined features.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen set of tested catalogues may not be representative and we cannot draw conclusions for the whole population of library catalogues.

Originality/value

The paper shows the current state of library catalogues and draws attention to some important issues concerning Web 2.0 trends. Features presented in the tabular outline can be used as pointers for further development of library catalogues.

Details

Program, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Ellen van Kleef, Tanja Meeuwsen, Jetteke Rigterink and Hans Van Trijp

In many countries, schools move toward healthier canteen assortments by limiting the supply of unhealthy foods. The question arises whether this gives any undesirable side…

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1839

Abstract

Purpose

In many countries, schools move toward healthier canteen assortments by limiting the supply of unhealthy foods. The question arises whether this gives any undesirable side effects with students (e.g. compensation in purchases from school to outside retailers, reactance) and how to handle these so that operating school canteens remains financially viable. The purpose of this paper is to identify perspectives toward healthy school food assortments held by vocational education students and professionals within secondary and vocational schools with responsibility for school food policy (e.g. school canteen workers, teachers, school directors) in the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus groups were conducted with students at a vocational school (n=25 in total). A semi-structured interview guide was used to conduct discussions. The interview guide also included three school canteen scenario’s (A: 100 percent healthy food, B: 50 percent healthy/50 percent unhealthy foods and C: 100 percent unhealthy food) and a set of nine intervention strategies. A brief survey included questions on the same three scenario’s and nine intervention strategies. A web-based survey was conducted among 68 professionals responsible for school food policy and included their evaluation of the same canteen scenarios and interventions. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. Content analysis was done on the qualitative data.

Findings

School food professionals were highly supportive of Scenario A (100 percent healthy food), as this formed a better fit with their policies and was believed to stronger encourage healthy eating. They did worry about financial feasibility given lower affordability and student reluctance to accept the assortment. Students were less in favor of Scenario A. Students discussed getting value for money and remaining freedom to make unhealthy choices. The authors discuss implications for policy makers who aim to implement measures to improve young people’s eating habits.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on creating healthier school food environments. This study uniquely examines a healthier school canteen from a viability perspective, including the views of students as primary customers. Given the need to progressively increase the number of foods complying to dietary guidelines in canteen assortments, this study provides insights into how and why assortment changes best can be implemented.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Diana Ingenhoff and Tanja Fuhrer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state of mission and vision statements on corporate web sites and to analyze differentiation strategies through the use…

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13799

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state of mission and vision statements on corporate web sites and to analyze differentiation strategies through the use of online brand personality attributes in order to find if and how the attributes are effectively used to build up a unique corporate identity.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is used to investigate similarities and differences between sectors and industries in Switzerland, based on the brand personality scale of Aaker. Also, the paper focuses on the impact of the communication of brand personality elements, in terms of positioning and differentiation, using correspondence analysis.

Findings

The claim that companies do present brand personality by frequently communicating respective attributes through mission and vision statements published on their web site are supported. However, top management does not seem to be geared towards industry norms when phrasing the statements, as a considerable similarity in statement content is found across industries. The results show that companies position themselves using their competitors as a frame of reference.

Research limitations/implications

The results may lack generalizability to small and medium‐sized businesses and other industries.

Practical implications

As most companies in the study position themselves using the same attributes and specifically emphasize “competence,” the results include practical implications for the need to develop uniqueness and differentiation by other means.

Originality/value

This paper discovers a gap between the claim that organizations seek uniqueness in their personality attributes and the reality of their involvement in mutual coorientation when defining their identity, forcing them to adapt to each other.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Primoz Juznic, Maja Blazic, Tanja Mercun, Barbara Plestenjak and Darko Majcenovic

In our modern society there is a prevailing belief that computers and the internet are mainly used by younger generations, who grew up with modern technology, and are…

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3243

Abstract

Purpose

In our modern society there is a prevailing belief that computers and the internet are mainly used by younger generations, who grew up with modern technology, and are generally all information literate. However, research shows that through the past ten years more and more older people have started to learn how to use computers and, of course, how to use the internet. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyse internet usage among seniors on the basis of a case study showing the actual situation in Slovenia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out among seniors, the participants of different Third Age University programmes, by using a questionnaire, designed for this study. This particular group of seniors was chosen because they lead more active lifestyle than average seniors and the results should be more relevant. Participating in these programmes means they are eager to learn new things and that they have access to computers.

Findings

It was found that among the seniors, Third Age University participants, only one third were active internet users. It was less than expected, as Slovenia has quite high internet usage among its citizens. Education and partly age were important factors in defining internet use. Public libraries can play a particularly important role in offering information literacy courses, offering space and others services to them, but this was not confirmed by the results of this study.

Research limitations/implications

The paper tried to establish the situation with a case study in Slovenia, a new EU member but also one of the European countries with the greatest use of internet and web. Digital divide, differences along the criteria of age, might be more important than elsewhere.

Originality/value

Use of internet and web will become more and more wide‐spread and problems with social groups left out will be more visible and will have negative implications on equality of all citizens. Seniors as a social group are especially vulnerable and need help. Libraries can and must find new services with initiatives that promote the reduction of digital divide among age groups.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

George K. Stylios

Examines the thirteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

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1314

Abstract

Examines the thirteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Tanja Mihalic

The purpose of this paper is to provide details of the communist and socialist past to inform the debate on redesigning tourism in Central and Eastern European (CEE…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide details of the communist and socialist past to inform the debate on redesigning tourism in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries as impacted by the transition and accelerated by European Union (EU) membership.

Design/methodology/approach

The issues from two sides are addressed: academic and practical. Based on a literature review, the authors propose a model of five main research topics that represent the main areas of change and conceptualise the general EU accession research debate on tourism. Content analysis is conducted on each of the revealed main research topics that are presented and discussed from the standpoint of tourism-relevant socialist and communist stature and image. On the other hand, this paper engages with reality as it surveys real-life practices in tourism development and business operation based on the personal experience of the researcher regarding the social situation under consideration.

Findings

The findings concerning the revealed main areas of tourism change in CEE countries following EU accession refer to the: change from communism towards a new image (Europeanisation and re-imaging), change from communism to capitalism (transformation and marketisation), change from old communist tourism products to new products (rejuvenation, diversification), change from communist towards sustainability values (sustainability) and change from tourism inside the communist block to international tourism (re-internationalisation) The discussion indicates how each area of change relates to socialist and communist content and its tourism relevance and the potential for tourism development, policy and business.

Research limitations/implications

The list of relevant works is not exhaustive as only tourism-focussed quality journals are surveyed in order to define the main areas of change.

Practical implications

A very relevant source of information and impartial advice for tourism developers and policymakers in ex-socialist and communist countries is provided regarding tourism development at the strategic and managerial levels.

Originality/value

This paper fills an identified information/resource gap concerning the potential and contribution of communist and socialist heritage to tourism development and business, and places this in the context of the changes CEE countries have made in order to stay and/or become tourism destinations. It introduces a new term “tourism redesign” which explains the transition in tourism development, policy and management through different areas of change.

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