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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Tamsin Newlove-Delgado, Darren Moore, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Ken Stein and Tamsin Ford

The purpose of this paper is to describe mental health-related contact with educational professionals amongst children in the British Child and Adolescent Mental Health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe mental health-related contact with educational professionals amongst children in the British Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey (BCAMHS) 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

BCAMHS 2004 was a community-based survey of 5,325 children aged 5-16, with follow-up in 2007. This paper reports the percentage of children with a psychiatric disorder that had mental health-related contact with education professionals (categorised as teachers or specialist education services) and the percentage with specific types of psychiatric disorders amongst those contacting services.

Findings

Two-thirds (66.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 62.4-69.8 per cent) of children with a psychiatric disorder had contact with a teacher regarding their mental health and 31.1 per cent (95 per cent CI: 27.5-34.7 per cent) had contact with special education either in 2004 or 2007, or both. Over half of children reporting special education contact (55.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 50.0-60.2 per cent) and almost a third reporting teacher contact in relation to mental health (32.1 per cent, 95 per cent CI: 29.7-34.6 per cent) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder.

Practical implications

Many children in contact with education professionals regarding mental health experienced clinical levels of difficulty. Training is needed to ensure that contact leads to prompt intervention and referral if necessary.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to report on mental health-related service contact with education professionals in the 2004 BCAMHS survey along with its 2007 follow-up. It identifies high levels of teacher contact which represent challenges in supporting staff with training, resources and access to mental health services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Tamsin Newlove‐Delgado, Elizabeth Murphy and Tamsin Ford

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of a screening test for looked after children in order to identify undetected psychiatric disorders.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of a screening test for looked after children in order to identify undetected psychiatric disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

Children aged four to 16 in care in one London Borough for four consecutive months were eligible for screening. Carers, teachers and children aged over 11 were asked to complete the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Where the SDQ suggested that a psychiatric disorder was “possible” or “probable”, participants were then invited to complete the Developmental and Well‐Being Assessment, which was rated by a senior psychiatrist to generate diagnoses if appropriate.

Findings

The paper finds that over one year, 23 children were eligible for screening. A total of 18 underwent the initial stage of screening, and seven were subsequently diagnosed with a formal psychiatric disorder.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the unmet need for mental health interventions among children looked after by the local authority and confirms the feasibility of a simple screening protocol.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Shelley Marie Norman, Tamsin Ford, William Henley and Robert Goodman

Routine outcome monitoring (ROM) is currently seen as a key driver for service improvement at individual, team and service level. The purpose this paper is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Routine outcome monitoring (ROM) is currently seen as a key driver for service improvement at individual, team and service level. The purpose this paper is to explore the relationships between a patient (parent) reported outcome measure (PROM), a practitioner reported outcome measure, and a patient (parent) reported experience measure (PREM).

Design/methodology/approach

A cohort of 302 primary school-age children was recruited and followed for one year from consecutively accepted referrals to three teams within two English Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (a PROM) and practitioners completed the Clinician Global Assessment Scale at baseline, six and 12 months; parents completed the Experience of Services Questionnaire (a PREM) at six and 12 months.

Findings

PROM and practitioner reported outcome measure data suggested poor clinical outcome in terms of symptoms, impact and levels of functioning but were accompanied by PREM evidence of high levels of satisfaction. There was an unexpectedly low correlation ( < 0.2) between both measures of outcome and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need to explore the relationships between different outcome measures to contribute to the understanding of ROM its validity.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Claire Parker, Ruth Marlow, Marc Kastner, Felix May, Oana Mitrofan, William Henley and Tamsin Ford

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association between children who are at risk of being or who have been excluded from school between the ages of 4 and 12 years…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association between children who are at risk of being or who have been excluded from school between the ages of 4 and 12 years and the role of psychopathology, development and attainment.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-control approach was conducted. Cases were children who had been excluded from school compared to those who had no reported exclusions and normative data where possible. A range of measures were used to collect information from the parent, child and teacher on areas covering the child’s mental health and well-being.

Findings

The findings showed the number of difficulties faced by children who are at risk of being or who have been excluded from school compared to gender- and age-matched controls and normative data increased. Behavioural difficulties were apparent in the majority of the cases and an alarming number of children reported self-harm. Interestingly nearly all the cases had recognised needs, but not all of them were accessing appropriate services.

Practical implications

There have been a number of changes regarding the identification and support of children’s mental health and well-being. This study highlights gaps in resources and provision, particularly around behavioural difficulties for children who are presenting as not coping in school.

Originality/value

The findings from the SKIP study indicate the complexities and compounded difficulties faced by children who are experiencing exclusion from school. By implementing a systematic group of assessments the study was able to identify these complexities of need across a vulnerable group of children.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Alison Hurst, Anna Price, Rebecca Walesby, Moira Doolan, Wendy Lanham and Tamsin Ford

Despite an increasing policy focus, routine outcome monitoring (ROM) is not common practice in UK children's services. This paper aims to examine whether it is feasible…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an increasing policy focus, routine outcome monitoring (ROM) is not common practice in UK children's services. This paper aims to examine whether it is feasible and valid to use measures from ROM of evidence-based parenting programmes (EBPPs) to assess the impact of services and to drive service improvements through feedback mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a secondary analysis of ROM measures collected from a London clinic offering EBPPs over five years. Demographic information from referrals was compared for attendees and non-attendees. Changes in parent reported child behaviour were measured using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS).

Findings

No significant differences were found in socio-demographic characteristics of attendees and non-attendees. Statistically significant differences were found between pre- and post-scores on parent reported SDQ scores and VAS concerns, as well as the SDQ Added Value Score. The data collected did not allow for investigation of a dose-response relationship between the level of attendance and any improvement made.

Originality/value

This study illustrates that ROM can provide useful information about the impact of EBPPs in a particular clinical context. Demographic data could support service managers to evaluate reach and uptake while evidence of improvements can be communicated back to parents and support future funding bids. Incomplete data limited the inferences that could be drawn, and collaborations between research centres and clinics may be a way to optimise the use of ROM to drive service improvement and innovation.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ruth Marlow, Lorraine Hansford, Vanessa Edwards, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Shelley Norman, Sara Ingarfield, Siobhan Sharkey, Stuart Logan and Tamsin Ford

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of a classroom management course as a public health intervention. Improved socio-emotional skills may boost…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of a classroom management course as a public health intervention. Improved socio-emotional skills may boost children’s developmental and academic trajectory, while the costs of behaviour problems are enormous for schools with considerable impact on others’ well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 40 teachers attended the Incredible Years (IY) Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) intervention in groups of ten. Afterwards teachers attended focus groups and semi-structured interviews were completed with headteachers to explore whether TCM was feasible, relevant and useful, research processes were acceptable and if it influenced teachers’ practice and pupils. Teachers completed standardised questionnaires about their professional self-efficacy, burnout and well-being before and after attendance.

Findings

In all, 37/40 teachers completed the course. Teachers valued sharing experiences, the support of colleagues in the group and time out to reflect on practice and rehearse new techniques. Most teachers reported that they applied the strategies with good effect in their classrooms. Teachers’ questionnaires suggested an improvement in their self-efficacy in relation to classroom management (p=0.03); other scales changed in the predicted direction but did not reach statistical significance.

Research limitations/implications

Although preliminary and small, these feasibility study findings suggest that it was worthwhile proceeding to a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT).

Practical implications

Should the RCT demonstrate effectiveness, then the intervention is an obvious candidate for implementation as a whole school approach.

Originality/value

Successful intervention with one teacher potentially benefits every child that they subsequently teach and may increase the inclusion of socio-economically deprived children living in challenging circumstances in mainstream education.

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Ruth Marlow, William T. Hunt, Marie-Claire Reville, Andrena Lynes, Jade Lowe and Tamsin Ford

Community-based randomised control trials (RCTs) rely heavily on the involvement and collaboration of statutory and third-sector services and their employees. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Community-based randomised control trials (RCTs) rely heavily on the involvement and collaboration of statutory and third-sector services and their employees. This paper seeks to explore the experiences of practitioners working within a statutory children and family service setting that delivered additional parenting programmes evaluated by an RCT.

Design/methodology/approach

Practitioners completed a semi-structured interview about their experiences of the research trial based on a topic guide. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Results suggest that the experience of being involved in research was mostly positive for practitioners, but also produced additional stress. The research brought them the experience of being involved with national and international teams; and they valued the additional supervision and training that they received. They spoke about the skills that they developed and how they were able to continue to use these after the research trial had ended.

Originality/value

Little is known about how services working alongside major research projects experience their involvement and what impact, if any, this has on them. This may be important as it could influence successful recruitment and retention of practitioners during RCTs, and the successful design and execution of other types of evaluation.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Hannah L. Thompson, Marie-Claire Reville, Anna Price, Laura Reynolds, Lauren Rodgers and Tamsin Ford

There is a lack of valid and reliable generic measures of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) for children under eight. The purpose of this paper is to assess the…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of valid and reliable generic measures of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) for children under eight. The purpose of this paper is to assess the psychometric properties of the newly formulated Quality of Life Scale for Children (QoL-C), which uses a pictorial response format.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 335 primary school children completed the QoL-C on two occasions, two weeks apart. Children aged four to seven were interviewed one-to-one while children aged eight to nine completed the measure as a class activity. Test-re-test reliability, convergent validity and child-parent concordance were assessed.

Findings

Only one child refused to complete the QoL-C, which suggests the measure is user-friendly. Test-re-test reliability was moderate for the measure's total score (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.48, 95 percent CI 0.39, 0.57) but low to fair for individual items (K from 0.13 to 0.37). Internal consistency was moderate (α=0.42 time one, 0.53 time two). A small significant correlation was found between the QoL-C and Child Health Meter in the expected direction (r=−0.32), suggesting convergent validity. There was low concordance between the children's QoL-C responses and parent's responses (r=0.19) to a parallel measure.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that further development of this measure is needed. However, the findings indicate that one-to-one support increases the reliability of very young children's responses. The use of pictures, emoticons and minimal text used in the QoL-C should be investigated further.

Originality/value

Low parent-child concordance underscores the importance of younger children getting the opportunity to share their views about their HRQoL.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Milena Stateva, Jacqueline Minton, Celia Beckett, Moira Doolan, Tamsin Ford, Angeliki Kallitsoglou and Stephen Scott

The Helping Children Achieve study is a randomised controlled trial designed to test the effectiveness of parenting interventions for children at risk of anti‐social…

Abstract

Purpose

The Helping Children Achieve study is a randomised controlled trial designed to test the effectiveness of parenting interventions for children at risk of anti‐social behaviour. The paper aims to examine the challenges in recruitment to the HCA trial.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is on‐going and is being conducted at two sites: an inner city London borough and a city in the South West of England. In total, 395 participants consented to participate in the trial; 325 were assessed at baseline and 215 met the criteria and agreed to take part. Recruitment used population screens and referrals.

Findings

The screening procedure was more labour intensive but attracted greater numbers, including many parents who might not otherwise have sought help and included many families from disadvantaged backgrounds. The referrals included those with more serious problems and a higher proportion engaged with the service. Recruitment rates were lower in the London site due to ineligibility and greater difficulty in accessing schools. Retention in the two areas was similar.

Originality/value

The study provides data on recruitment challenges and lessons learned that could help formulate future policy regarding service delivery. Also of value is the finding that it is possible to conduct population screens in very deprived, multi‐ethnic areas and to get high rates of return.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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