Search results

1 – 10 of 10
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2011

Kelly L. Zellars, Logan Justice and Tammy E. Beck

The concept of resilience has exploded in the popular press covering topics from sports to the environment to the economy. Organizational scholars across disciplines have…

Abstract

The concept of resilience has exploded in the popular press covering topics from sports to the environment to the economy. Organizational scholars across disciplines have joined the discussion, but much remains unknown about the ability to build resilience capacity at work. Individual and organizational resilience is challenged by a world in constant flux, and having the ability to navigate unexpected or significant change is vital for success and well-being. This chapter explores several promising avenues of research to gain a better understanding of factors that build resilience capacity at work. We take an interdisciplinary approach to examine leadership, job crafting, and humor, through the lens of sensemaking, as a means to increase resilience capacity.

Details

The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2011

Abstract

Details

The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2011

Samantha K. Baard holds a University Distinguished Fellowship in Michigan State University's Ph.D. program in organizational psychology. Her research interests include…

Abstract

Samantha K. Baard holds a University Distinguished Fellowship in Michigan State University's Ph.D. program in organizational psychology. Her research interests include individual and team adaptability, leadership, motivation, cross-cultural differences, and stress. She is also examining, from a statistical and methodological perspective, the dynamic processes of motivation, feedback, and performance. As a University Scholar at George Mason University, she investigated the interactive effects of leadership and motivation on individual performance. She spent three years working as a research fellow at the Consortium of Research Fellows Program where she worked with the U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences studying team effectiveness, cross-cultural competence, leadership, and motivation. She has served as a guest lecturer at several colleges, and has presented her research at the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology's Annual Conference.

Details

The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Steven G. Rogelberg, Logan Justice, Phillip W. Braddy, Samantha C. Paustian‐Underdahl, Eric Heggestad, Linda Shanock, Benjamin E. Baran, Tammy Beck, Shawn Long, Ashley Andrew, David G. Altman and John W. Fleenor

The theoretical and practical criticality of self‐talk for leader success receives extensive multidisciplinary discussion, without a great deal of empirical research given…

Downloads
3935

Abstract

Purpose

The theoretical and practical criticality of self‐talk for leader success receives extensive multidisciplinary discussion, without a great deal of empirical research given the challenge of assessing actual self‐talk. The purpose of this paper is to advance research and theory on self‐leadership by examining leader self‐talk and its relationship to effectiveness and strain.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 189 senior executives' self‐addressed, future‐oriented letters were collected. The executives wrote these letters to themselves for their own personal development; thus, the language used represented a form of naturally occurring self‐talk. Two types of self‐talk were coded: constructive and dysfunctional. Supervisor and direct report ratings of leadership of others and creativity and self‐ratings of job strain were collected.

Findings

Extensive variability among leaders in constructive self‐talk was found. Exemplars of constructive and dysfunctional self‐talk are presented. Constructive self‐talk positively related to effective leadership of others and creativity/originality as evaluated by subordinates and superiors and was negatively related to job strain. Dysfunctional self‐talk related negatively to creativity/originality.

Originality/value

In addition to illustrating the types of self‐talk used by leaders, research is extended by providing some of the first empirical evidence of how leaders' free‐flowing thoughts are related to their effectiveness and their overall well‐being, lending direct support to a principal proposition from the self‐leadership framework.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Joseph A. Allen, Tammy Beck, Cliff W. Scott and Steven G. Rogelberg

The purpose of this study is to propose a taxonomy of meeting purpose. Meetings are a workplace activity that deserves increased attention from researchers and…

Downloads
2760

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a taxonomy of meeting purpose. Meetings are a workplace activity that deserves increased attention from researchers and practitioners. Previous researchers attempted to develop typologies of meeting purpose with limited success. Through a comparison of classification methodologies, the authors consider a taxonomy as the appropriate classification scheme for meeting purpose. The authors then utilize the developed taxonomy to investigate the frequency with which a representative sample of working adults engaged in meetings of these varying purposes. Their proposed taxonomy provides relevant classifications for future research on meetings as well and serves as a useful tool for managers seeking to use and evaluate the effectiveness of meetings within their organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an inductive methodology using discourse analysis of qualitative meeting descriptions to develop a taxonomy of meeting purpose. The authors discourse analysis utilizes open-ended survey responses from a sample of working adults (n = 491).

Findings

The authors categorical analysis of open-ended questions resulted in a 16-category taxonomy of meeting purpose. The two most prevalent meeting purpose categories in this sample were “to discuss ongoing projects” at 11.6 per cent and “to routinely discuss the state of the business” at 10.8 per cent. The two least common meeting purpose categories in this sample were “to brainstorm for ideas or solutions” at 3.3 per cent and “to discuss productivity and efficiencies” at 3.7 per cent. The taxonomy was analyzed across organizational type and employee job level to identify differences between those important organizational and employee characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The data suggested that meetings were institutionalized in organizations, making them useful at identifying differences between organizations as well as differences in employees in terms of scope of responsibility. Researchers and managers should consider the purposes for which they call meetings and how that manifests their overarching organizational focus, structure and goals.

Originality/value

This is the first study to overtly attempt to categorize the various purposes for which meetings are held. Further, this study develops a taxonomy of meeting purposes that will prove useful for investigating the different types of meeting purposes in a broad range of organizational types and structures.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Life is made up of debits and credits, as Kipling wrote, long accounts have to be paid — mistakes, misconduct, misdeeds, all the mischief and harm they cause, exact…

Abstract

Life is made up of debits and credits, as Kipling wrote, long accounts have to be paid — mistakes, misconduct, misdeeds, all the mischief and harm they cause, exact payment which has to be met by someone, not necessarily those that cause the trouble; all too often by innocent victims. The recent industrial strife, destruction and violence, despite the plausible excuses for it, will have disastrous results, a colossal debit in the nation's accounts; and the mass of the people, the vulnerable groups including several millions of elderly pensioners, the handicapped and sick, are under no illusions who will have to pay. The posturing defiance — “heads held high”, bands playing martial music — the complete lack of concern or regret for others will make no difference to the overtaking retribution.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norm Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, James P. Carter and Harold Lazarus

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross…

Downloads
1176

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross domestic product each year) segment of the US economy. The purpose of this paper is to focus on outcome successes that illustrate application of a previously reported health equation. The health equation allows an organized and more transparent assessment of healthcare outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach includes “end use/least cost” techniques that identifies healthful care as a big unmet need (BUN) and equally attractive business opportunity in identifying health promotion that improves outcome at lower net costs.

Findings

Opportunity exists to reduce costs while also reducing adverse events, healthcare morbidity and morality. Transparency is essential to find what works more effectively to yield desired outcomes. Metrics and measures, particularly more precise tools to assess true outcome in promoting health or managing ill health, are given priority as they allow quantified and, often econometric, outcome opportunities in the midst of current uncertainties.

Practical implications

This paper is for consumers and businesses, managers and administrators, professionals and allied health professionals. The successes described herein illustrate fundamental opportunities driving change and innovation within healthcare and in our society.

Originality/value

Attention is called to opportunity areas that can fund out of savings the transition from the authors' current “sickness care” system to a healthful care, proactive prevention approach to delivering care. Novel application of transparency and end use/least cost can help guide choices to achieve healthier outcomes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Timo Tammi

Paying and repaying behavior are financial functions of great interest to private financial actors and public regulators, as also to academic researchers. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Paying and repaying behavior are financial functions of great interest to private financial actors and public regulators, as also to academic researchers. The purpose of the paper is to empirically analyse paying and repaying behavior by combining theoretical insights from an emerging field in economics known as “culture and finance” with ideas from the economic analysis of social capital and trust in the context of different regulatory systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper investigates with the help of panel data whether a culture of social trust and the scope of morality have an influence on paying and repaying behavior in different European and OECD countries.

Findings

The analysis shows that culture has an effect on firms' credit losses from the customers' payment defaults, on the overall riskiness of paying behavior and on the level of non‐performing bank loans. Also the complexity of law‐based regulation has an influence on paying and repaying behavior. The analysis also shows that high trust and morality are associated with less complex regulation and vice versa.

Practical implications

The results help private financial actors, regulators and public policy makers to design more appropriate behavioral environments for paying and repaying.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first analysis of an important issue and it serves both practical interest and further research on the topic.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Eeva Lyyra, Mervi Roos and Tarja Suominen

The purpose of this study is to describe the workplace culture and factors associated with it from the viewpoint of the personnel providing care to patients with dual diagnosis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the workplace culture and factors associated with it from the viewpoint of the personnel providing care to patients with dual diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from six organizations using an electronic survey in 2019. The respondents (n = 75) worked in addiction psychiatry in specialized health care and provided care to patients. The data were statistically analyzed.

Findings

Workplace culture was evaluated as positive. Stress was experienced occasionally (Md = 2.58, Q1 = 1.96, Q3 = 3.03), job satisfaction levels were moderate (Md = 4.83, Q1 = 4.28, Q3 = 5.44) and the practice environment was evaluated as neutral (Md = 4.46, Q1 = 4.00, Q3 = 5.04). Gender, age in years, employment relationship, work time, staffing, number of patients and the participants’ experience in health care and experience in their current workplace had statistically significant associations with workplace culture.

Originality/value

In Finland, there have been attempts to reform service structures that also influence mental health and substance addiction services. Workplace culture is one approach to promote service development. Yet, there has been no research on workplace culture in the context of the care of patients with dual diagnosis. The results of this study bring knowledge about how health-care personnel perceives stress, job satisfaction and their practice environment in addiction psychiatry, which can be used to further develop services and workplace culture.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Taru Lindblom and Pekka Mustonen

The purpose of this paper is to study a wide range of culinary tastes and their legitimacy in a contemporary urban context. The authors aim at finding out which cuisines…

Downloads
1285

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study a wide range of culinary tastes and their legitimacy in a contemporary urban context. The authors aim at finding out which cuisines are the most popular and to what extent this popularity translates into eating out.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data (n=1715) gathered among young adults residing in Helsinki (aged 25-44) measuring preferences and restaurant visits for 19 cuisine types. Measures for expressed legitimacy and actualised legitimacy for all the 19 cuisine types.

Findings

The most preferred cuisine types are pizza, other Italian fare and traditional Nordic fare, including home cooking. The most visited restaurants by cuisine type are pizza, fast food and Italian. However, the most legitimate (both expressed and actualised) cuisines are Korean, African, fine dining and French. Several dissonances were found between stated likes and actual consumer behaviour. The results suggest that although fast food bears a stigma as socially unacceptable cuisine, it is, nonetheless, very frequently eaten in the restaurants.

Research limitations/implications

As the data account only for a fraction of the population, limited by both age and region, it would be relevant for future research to investigate this on a larger scale in order to make (inter)nationally representative conclusions.

Originality/value

A research design taking into account such a wide range of cuisine types has not been presented before.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10