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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Suhail Al Bastaki, Washika Haak-Saheem and Tamer K. Darwish

The authors seek to explore the interplay between perceived training opportunities (PTOs) and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economic setting of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors seek to explore the interplay between perceived training opportunities (PTOs) and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economic setting of the United Arab Emirates. The authors also examined the moderating role of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction on the relationship between PTOs and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a survey method to collect the data and tested the proposed hypotheses by using the partial structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) technique. Data is based on 815 responses across all sectors in the country context of the UAE.

Findings

The study findings indicate that PTOs are positively related to knowledge sharing. Notably, the results show that the proposed relationship between PTOs and knowledge sharing is negatively and significantly moderated by intrinsic motivation. Moreover, the moderating roles of extrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction were insignificant.

Originality/value

At a theoretical level, this article provides an individual-level analysis, which indicates that PTOs pave the way for intraorganizational knowledge sharing; hence, they offer insights into the mechanisms in which PTOs impact on knowledge sharing. This article also contributes to our general understanding on human resource management (HRM) practices and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economy of the UAE; the latter has a number of implications for both theory and practice as delineated in this study.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Tamer K. Darwish, Abdul Fattaah Mohamed, Geoffrey Wood, Satwinder Singh and Jocelyne Fleming

The resource curse literature suggests that firms operating in non-oil and non-gas industries in petrostates face considerable challenges in securing competitiveness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The resource curse literature suggests that firms operating in non-oil and non-gas industries in petrostates face considerable challenges in securing competitiveness and sustaining themselves. Based on a firm-level survey within a micro-petrostate, Brunei, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between specific HR policies and practices and organisational performance; analyse, compare, and contrast oil and gas with non-oil and non-gas sectors; and draw out the comparative lessons for understanding the potential and performance consequences of HR interventions in resource-centred national economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were generated from a primary survey administered amongst the HR directors in companies operating in all sectors in Brunei. A statistically representative sample size of 214 was selected.

Findings

The authors confirmed that firms in the oil and gas sector indeed performed better than other sectors. However, the authors found that the negative effects associated with operating outside of oil and gas could be mitigated through strategic choices: the strategic involvement of HR directors in the affairs of the company reduced employee turnover and added positively to financial returns across sectors.

Practical implications

Developing and enhancing the role of people management is still very much easier than bringing about structural institutional reforms: the study confirms that at least part of the solution to contextual difficulties lies within, and that the firm-level consequences of the resource curse can be ameliorated through a strategic choice.

Originality/value

The nature of the present investigation is one of few studies conducted in South East Asia in general and in the context of Brunei, in particular. It also contributes to the authors’ understanding whether HR interventions can ameliorate the challenges of operating in a non-resource sector in a resource-rich country.

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Satwinder Singh, Geoffrey Wood, Jaithen Alharbi and Tamer K. Darwish

This purpose of this paper is to explore variations in the extent of control mechanisms, according to country of origin and organizational characteristics, in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to explore variations in the extent of control mechanisms, according to country of origin and organizational characteristics, in a challenging country of domicile.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research design involving the use of a questionnaire as the primary data source was adopted. A total of 350 subsidiaries were initially randomly selected and contacted in person, or via telephone and e-mail, of which 147 agreed to take part in the study and responded to the survey.

Findings

The authors find that Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) from highly financialized Liberal Market Economies will be associated with a greater reliance on formalized control mechanisms; this will enable the MNE’s headquarters to closely monitor subsidiary managers according to objective measures, to ensure that the maximum shareholder value is released.

Research limitations/implications

This study reveals a greater reliance on control mechanisms in larger firms, reflecting a desire to maximize bureaucratic economies of scale.

Practical implications

The authors find that the presence of expatriates regardless of country of origin leads to greater decentralization, suggesting foreign firms do not trust local staff.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies of this nature conducted for the region of Middle East – and the only one the authors are aware of for Saudi Arabia. Further, it sheds new light on the impact of contextual circumstances on how closely firms monitor their subsidiaries, the challenges of doing business in the Gulf region and the consequences of the large-scale usage of expatriates.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Mohammad Rezaei-Zadeh and Tamer K Darwish

The purpose of this paper is to provide an integrated framework to indicate which antecedents of absorptive capacity (AC) influence its learning processes, and to propose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an integrated framework to indicate which antecedents of absorptive capacity (AC) influence its learning processes, and to propose testing of this model in future work.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature into the antecedents of AC was critically reviewed and analysed with the objective of categorising and explaining the influence of AC on learning processes, including exploratory, transformative and exploitative learning.

Findings

By considering the level of learning, the proposed model demonstrates that the antecedents of AC vary, comprising exploratory, transformative and exploitative learning processes. Moreover, this study reveals the complex interplay between the antecedents of AC.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model was developed theoretically, thus pending further empirical validation according to environmental turbulence, knowledge characteristics and modes of governance. This study also urges researchers to explore whether or not the antecedents of AC differ based on organisational outcomes.

Practical implications

The model can be put into a testable template for use by researchers. It further guides managers in developing effective processes for learning to use external knowledge.

Originality/value

It is the first work to schematically bring together and discuss the antecedents of AC and its influence on learning processes, and further provides a framework capable of facilitating the empirical testing of this nexus.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Washika Haak-Saheem and Tamer K. Darwish

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the role of knowledge management (KM) in creating a culture of learning and creativity in a non-western context. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the role of knowledge management (KM) in creating a culture of learning and creativity in a non-western context. It further seeks to stimulate broader empirical and theoretical discussions on this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

As little is known about KM approaches in the regional context, the qualitative approach was chosen as an appropriate method of studying this phenomenon. The openness of the qualitative method enables data collection that is not constrained by predetermined categories of analysis, and thus allows for a level of depth and detail that quantitative methods cannot provide. The empirical investigation is based on semi-structured interviews and conducted in the KM department of Dubai Municipality.

Findings

Results indicate that the impact of KM on organisational learning (OL) is below expectations. Written official statements or policies are not sufficient to enforce learning and creativity. Notably, institutional changes at the extreme produce conditions that might reduce the rate of OL. The role of KM is to develop context-specific strategies to embrace learning and creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The developmental process as it unfolds in Dubai has hardly been addressed by academics. However, because of the absence of research related to the regional context in general and KM and OL in particular the authors recommend future researchers to explore the impact of institutional settings on managing knowledge and learning. Researchers can identify in this regard the complexity of an emerging economy and attempt to develop a more fine-tuned understanding of its relationship to KM and OL.

Practical implications

In light of the institutional structures, the findings on KM and OL provide managers guidance in making decisions under extremely uncertain institutional settings.

Originality/value

KM and OL have been discussed within organisational and management research; however, the majority of these studies adopt a western-based perspective. This paper contributes to the understanding of the relationship between KM and OL in an emerging market setting, which has so far received insufficient attention.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Satwinder Singh, Tamer K. Darwish, Ana Cristina Costa and Neil Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the HRM and organisational performance (OP) nexus by drawing attention to the complex interplay of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the HRM and organisational performance (OP) nexus by drawing attention to the complex interplay of internal and external factors affecting OP, and to further provide an integrated framework for the testing of this nexus.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature is reviewed and assessed critically. A theoretical framework is provided with the objective to measure the HRM‐OP nexus.

Findings

Whilst the majority of the extant literature on HRM has focused mainly on internal factors, the authors suggest that the domain of the internal factors considered thus far needs to be widened and external factors need to be acknowledged explicitly. They provide a schematic model portraying the intricate nature of internal and external factors. They subsequently provide an integrated framework of factors in order to measure HRM practices' effects on OP.

Research limitations/implications

The suggested framework is theoretical pending empirical testing. The framework can serve as a template for future research.

Practical implications

The framework can be put into a universally testable template for use by researchers.

Originality/value

The paper, for the first time, schematically brings together and discusses the elements affecting the HRM‐OP nexus, and further provides a framework in the form of a set of exhaustive factors – which will facilitate this nexus being put to empirical test.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Tamer Khalil Darwish and Satwinder Singh

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically the relationship between the strategic involvement and the devolvement of human resource functions with organisational performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically the relationship between the strategic involvement and the devolvement of human resource functions with organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the primary data collected from the population of financial firms based in Jordan. The methodology adopted for the purpose of data analysis includes the use of basic statistics, zero‐order correlations, confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regressions.

Findings

The results provide strong support for the hypothesis that the involvement of human resource functions into the business and corporate strategy reduces employee turnover rate and enhances financial performance. The analysis does not support the second hypothesis that empowering day‐to‐day human resource functions to line managers impacts negatively on employee turnover and positively on financial performance.

Practical implications

Our results imply that financial performance can be enhanced and employee turnover rate decreased by involving human resource directors in the overall strategic decision‐making process of companies. However, our results also imply that the devolvement of routine human resource issues to line managers is neither positively related to the financial performance of the companies nor negatively related to employee turnover. This raises doubts as to whether, after having involved human resource functions into the strategic affairs of the company, they are empowered enough to make a positive impact.

Originality/value

This is one of few papers conducted on this topic in a non‐western environment, and the first of its kind for the country of Jordan. This paper contributes to the field through its approach to measuring and testing strategic human resource management theory. The paper also successfully links the core aspects of strategic human resource management with objective indicators of financial performance of the companies.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Christopher John Etheridge and Emma Derbyshire

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the purpose of the present review was to collate evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic review comprised ten human trials (560 participants), investigating inter-relationships between herbal infusions consumption and health. Only human studies involving German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. Asteraceae), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe Zingiberaceae), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L. Lamiaceae), peppermint (Mentha x spicata L. Lamiaceae)/spearmint (Mentha spicata L. Lamiaceae) and rosehip (Rosa canina L. Rosaceae) teas were included in the present paper.

Findings

Most herbal infusions serve as a good source of flavonoids and other polyphenols in the human diet. Studies included in this paper indicate that herbal infusions (1-3 cups tended to be drank daily; infusion rates up to 15 min) could benefit certain aspects of health. In particular, this includes aspects of sleep quality and glycaemic control (German chamomile), osteoarthritic stiffness and hormone control (spearmint), oxidative stress (lemon balm) and primary dysmenorrhea (rosehip).

Research limitations/implications

Ongoing research is needed using homogenous herbal infusion forms, brewing rates and volumes of water to further reinforce these findings. In the meantime, herbal infusions could provide a useful supplementary approach to improving certain aspects of well-being.

Originality/value

The present paper collates evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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