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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Ahmed Eldegwy, Tamer H. Elsharnouby and Wael Kortam

The purpose of this paper is to integrate branding and higher education literature to conceptualize, develop, and empirically examine a model of university social…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate branding and higher education literature to conceptualize, develop, and empirically examine a model of university social augmenters’ brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on an empirical survey of 401 undergraduate students enrolled in private universities in Egypt, this study model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings reveal that university social augmenters’ reputation, coach-to-student interactions, and student-to-student interactions influence students’ satisfaction with social augmenters. The results also suggest that students satisfied with university social augmenters are more likely to exhibit outcomes of brand equity – namely, brand identification, willingness to recommend, and willingness to incur an additional premium cost.

Practical implications

The results offer managerial implications for university administrators in their quest to enrich students’ university experiences and build strong sub-brands within the university setting. University social augmenters are found to have strong brand equity manifestations and may hold the potential to differentiate university brands in an industry dominated by experience and credence.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the extant literature by filling two gaps in university branding literature. First, previous research has never unified separate streams of literature related to augmented services and brand equity. Second, limited conceptual and empirical research on university branding in general and university social augmentation in particular has been conducted in emerging markets, which has resulted in conceptual ambiguity for the key factors constructing students’ university social experiences.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2020

Amro A. Maher and Tamer H. Elsharnouby

This study aims to develop and examine a model that links the foreigner service orientation, defined as indigenous consumers’ preference for service environments popular…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and examine a model that links the foreigner service orientation, defined as indigenous consumers’ preference for service environments popular among foreign versus local consumers, to both foreigner and local comfort in intercultural service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected cross-sectional survey data from 516 indigenous consumers in Qatar.

Findings

According to the findings, although foreigner comfort is positively related to their service orientation, local comfort is negatively related to foreigner service orientation. The results further indicate that the relationships are intensified when cosmopolitanism or collective narcissism is high and when consumers are alone in the service setting.

Practical implications

Service firms can use the findings of this research to create a meaningful service environment based on consumers’ orientation to the in-group and out-group.

Originality value

The examination of the foreigner service orientation addresses the possibility that consumers might prefer foreign consumers to local ones in service environments. This research also addresses the dearth of research on customer-to-customer intercultural service encounter.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Said Elbanna and Tamer H. Elsharnouby

The purpose of this study is to address a timely research question by clarifying whether formal planning is a worthy approach for hotels. In so doing, the authors…

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4833

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address a timely research question by clarifying whether formal planning is a worthy approach for hotels. In so doing, the authors developed a theoretical model that extends prior research by exploring how the formal planning process influences organizational capabilities and decision-making style. The model also examines the impact of the three identified factors on planning effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 175 hotels located in United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar and hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The study concludes that the practice of formal planning in the tourism sector does matter and both organizational capabilities and decision-making style are important factors in predicting planning effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizations to organizations operating in other sectors, such as manufacturing or government sectors, should be drawn cautiously.

Practical implications

Taking into account oil price volatility and serious political crises in the region, this study provides several insights to hotel managers into how the formal planning process can influence planning effectiveness.

Originality/value

The findings enrich the debate on the role of formal planning in the tourism sector, which has been relatively devoid of similar studies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Tamer H. Elsharnouby and Abeer A. Mahrous

This exploratory paper aims to extend the research on customer co-creation behavior into an emerging market. To this end, it empirically examines the influence of…

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4257

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory paper aims to extend the research on customer co-creation behavior into an emerging market. To this end, it empirically examines the influence of e-service quality dimensions on customers’ willingness to participate in online co-creation experience, in conjunction with customer attitude and intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a sample of 215 customers from the Egyptian telecommunication sector were collected and analyzed using structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The findings suggest that, although five e-service quality dimensions (efficiency, system availability, privacy, responsiveness and compensation) affect the attitude toward the Web site, another set of the dimensions (efficiency, fulfillment, compensation and contact) affects customers’ willingness to participate in the co-creation experience. The findings also support that customers’ attitudes toward the Web site affect the intention to use the Web site, which, in turn, affects customers’ willingness to participate in the online co-creation experience.

Practical implications

In their move toward mass customization, companies face the challenge of engaging a huge number of users. Deep and engaging interactions with customers could be one of the differentiators a company might cultivate to serve the market better. Thus, online co-creation activities might broaden the horizon for a cost-effective approach striving for close ties and a high level of customer engagement.

Originality/value

Despite the intensive use of the Internet in distributing e-services, little attention has been paid thus far to extend e-service quality models to incorporate customer participation in the online co-creation experience. In particular, this exploratory study identifies the important dimensions of e-service quality that influences customers’ willingness to participate in the online co-creation experience.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Tamer H. Elsharnouby

The purpose of this paper is to integrate service marketing and higher education (HE) literature to develop and test a model that links customer participation behaviour…

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1122

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate service marketing and higher education (HE) literature to develop and test a model that links customer participation behaviour with student overall satisfaction that stems from satisfaction with service augmentation elements. It also examines the influence of brand choice attainment on both satisfaction and participation behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on an empirical survey of 238 international students in UK universities, the model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings reveal that not all service augmenters are equally important in creating student satisfaction. Campus life and maintenance augmenters are found to be the crucial elements in generating satisfaction for international students. The results also suggest that satisfied students are more likely to participate actively in co-producing the university services compared to dissatisfied students. The effect of brand choice attainment on participation behaviour is mediated by satisfaction.

Practical implications

University administrations might need to prioritize their efforts to put more emphasis on some elements especially crucial for international students and could embellish or deplete the core of education services. The study provides a fresh perspective on segmenting international students based on their brand choice attainment. A superior university experience should be created, particularly for those who did not get into their preferred university, to overcome the disappointment of not studying at the preferred university.

Originality/value

By synthesizing diverse concepts from research on services marketing, branding and HE, this paper contributes theoretically by extending the research on customer participation behaviour into the HE domain. It attempts to address a clear gap between how service literature and HE literature look at “service experience”. The study captures some missing aspects of the “service” in the HE sector (e.g. augmentation aspects). The study also takes the HE literature one step further by identifying the role of brand choice attainment in both satisfaction and students’ participation behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Ahmed Shaalan, Marwa Tourky, Bradley R. Barnes, Chanaka Jayawardhena and Ibrahim Elshaer

This study aims to examine the Arab practice of wasta (personal networks) and its potential interface with relationship marketing to enable firms to optimize their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the Arab practice of wasta (personal networks) and its potential interface with relationship marketing to enable firms to optimize their recruitment and retention of customers in societies where personal ties drive business relationships. It explores whether relationship marketing influences customer retention when a personal contact leaves.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were gathered from 305 customers introduced to Egyptian small and medium-sized enterprises via wasta. Multiple-item scales were adopted, drawn from previous empirical studies. Quantitative analysis was used, including confirmatory factor analysis. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships posited.

Findings

Wasta plays a significant role in attracting customers, nurturing early relationships and enhancing relationship quality, but does not influence the retention of customers. Practicing relationship marketing post wasta can enhance customer loyalty, even if the business was developed through the wasta contact who left to join a rival firm.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations arise from cultural differences in other Middle Eastern countries. Future studies could also validate the results in different sectors/industries and explore managers and employees’ perspectives.

Practical implications

Several recommendations emerge for managerial practitioners, including the use of wasta to attract business, but more significantly, the need for the effective use of relationship marketing to retain business. The study suggests that if relationship marketing is practiced well, customers are likely to remain loyal to the firm, even if the business was developed through a personal wasta relationship with an employee who subsequently moved to a competitor firm.

Originality/value

This study is the first to develop a unified model connecting the Eastern notion of wasta (personal ties) with relationship marketing. The study enhances the knowledge of wasta and relationship marketing. It is among the first to suggest that should employees with personal connections to customers leave to join a competing firm, there is still a strong likelihood that if relationship marketing is effectively practiced, then customers will remain loyal to the firm (rather than to the former employee).

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Amro A. Maher and Anusorn Singhapakdi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the moral failure of a scandalized foreign brand afflicted with a product-harm crisis on competing brands (i.e…

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1129

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the moral failure of a scandalized foreign brand afflicted with a product-harm crisis on competing brands (i.e. within the same product category) while taking into account the country of origin (COO) of the brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of two studies. The first study uses an experimental design, while the second uses a survey to examine a real-life product-harm crisis.

Findings

The results indicate that the moral failure of a scandalized foreign brand has an indirect negative effect on the intention to purchase competing foreign brands from the COO of the scandalized foreign brand. This effect is, however, reversed for domestic brands, where moral failure has an indirect positive effect on the intention to purchase competing domestic brands.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research were based on an examination of how US consumers responded to the moral failure of Japanese and German brands. Future studies should examine brands from different COOs in different countries.

Practical implications

These results suggest that competing foreign brands from the COO of the scandalized brand should collaborate to quickly handle a product-harm crisis to prevent a spillover and that domestic competitors should capitalize on the opportunity to attract new customers.

Originality/value

This study represents a first attempt to examine the effect of a foreign brand’s moral failure in handling product-harm crisis on competing brands, both foreign and domestic.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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