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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Nicola Gratton and Ros Beddows

With confidence in the British Political system in decline, it is more important than ever that the top-down approach to decision-making and service strategy in public…

Abstract

With confidence in the British Political system in decline, it is more important than ever that the top-down approach to decision-making and service strategy in public services is challenged. In this chapter, we examine how coproduction of services can be achieved using Get Talking, an approach to participatory action research that utilizes creative consultation techniques to engage with publics. We explain how the approach enabled Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to involve young people in the development of a Children and Young People’s Strategy. The case study approach, building on qualitative methods including focus groups and semi-structured interviews, demonstrates how creative approaches were used by public sector staff to engage young people and partners in strategy development. Creative consultation techniques were used to facilitate the focus group activity. While using Get Talking as an approach to policy development required a resource investment in terms of staff time, it provided SFRS with insight into the needs of service users. This resulted in a more relevant strategy being developed and a cultural shift in how the organization works with young people. Engagement with the Get Talking process had a positive effect on staff, providing them with a sense of ownership over the resulting strategy, enhanced the reputation of SFRS with partners, and improved relationships with young people through demonstrating that they were valued partners in coproduction. While the approach was well received by all parties, challenges of using Get Talking in a public service setting resulted in pragmatic adaptations to a traditional PAR approach.

Details

From Austerity to Abundance?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-465-1

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Heather Tolland and Heather Laithwaite

The purpose of this paper is to explore patient and staff views of a new intervention “Talking Groups” within a medium secure setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore patient and staff views of a new intervention “Talking Groups” within a medium secure setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven patients and eight members of staff who had attended Talking Groups in the medium secure wards participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis revealed four key themes related to the aims, content and perceived benefits of Talking Groups: information; relationship building; engagement and patient involvement in developing activities/interventions.

Practical implications

If Talking Groups are extended to other wards in the medium secure unit, information sessions should continue as part of the groups, as these were valued by patients and provided useful information about transition, human rights and medication.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that Talking Groups have benefits for patients and staff within this medium secure setting. Findings from this evaluation can be used to inform the development of Talking Groups across different wards in this unit.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Joan Murphy, Cindy Gray and Sylvia Cox

Enabling people with dementia to continue to communicate their views, needs and preferences as their condition progresses is essential for development of person‐centred…

Abstract

Enabling people with dementia to continue to communicate their views, needs and preferences as their condition progresses is essential for development of person‐centred services and care facilities. This paper describes part of a 15‐month research project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. It examined the effectiveness of Talking Mats, a low‐technology communication tool, to help people with dementia express their opinions, in comparison with usual communication methods. The study involved 31 people at different stages of dementia who were interviewed about their well‐being under three conditions: unstructured (ordinary) conversation, structured conversation and Talking Mats conversation. The study found that Talking Mats can improve the communication ability of many people at all stages of dementia in expressing their views about their well‐being.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Anna Hampson Lundh and Genevieve Marie Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to analyse empirical studies regarding the use of digital talking books (Digital Accessible Information System (DAISY) books) as well as the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse empirical studies regarding the use of digital talking books (Digital Accessible Information System (DAISY) books) as well as the possibilities and limitations that users with print disabilities encounter when using these books. Upon fulfilment of this purpose, it is also possible to identify research needs in the area of talking books.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of 12 empirical studies concerning the use of DAISY books is conducted. The concept of affordances is employed in the analysis, which focuses on: users of talking books, talking books as objects, and the social settings in which talking books are used.

Findings

First, the reviewed literature indicates that the navigational features of the DAISY talking book appear to provide unprecedented affordances in terms of the users’ approaches to reading. However, the affordances of talking books depend, to some extent, on whether the users have visual impairments or dyslexia/reading and writing difficulties. Second, the reviewed literature illustrates that the affordances provided by talking books depend on the settings in which they are used, both in terms of specific social situations and wider socio-political contexts.

Originality/value

Although the need for assistive reading technologies, such as digital talking books, is large, research in this area is scarce, particularly from a user perspective. This paper describes the results of those studies which have actually been conducted on this topic and highlights areas that require further study.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Joan Murphy, Cindy Gray and Sylvia Cox

The aims of this project were to establish whether Talking Mats, a low tech communication framework, helps people with dementia to communicate and to examine how effective…

Abstract

The aims of this project were to establish whether Talking Mats, a low tech communication framework, helps people with dementia to communicate and to examine how effective the Talking Mats framework is for people at different stages of dementia. Thirty‐one people at three stages of dementia were interviewed about their well‐being under three interview conditions ‐ an unstructured (ordinary) conversation, a structured conversation and using the Talking Mats framework.The results indicated that conversations using the Talking Mats framework improved communication for people at all stages of dementia but that not all people at late‐stage dementia could use the Talking Mats framework effectively.The researchers concluded that the Talking Mats framework may therefore play an important role in improving quality of care by providing a simple, low‐cost tool that family and staff can use to engage with people with dementia and help them express their views about a range of topics.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Arnold Japutra, Yuksel Ekinci, Lyndon Simkin and Bang Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of ideal self-congruence in instigating two types of negative consumer behaviours – compulsive buying and external…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of ideal self-congruence in instigating two types of negative consumer behaviours – compulsive buying and external trash-talking – and the mediating role of brand attachment on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were designed using a structural equation modelling methodology. Study 1a was based on a mail survey of 280 respondents, whereas Study 1b was based on an electronic survey of 152 respondents. Study 1b was conducted to test the external validity of the research model.

Findings

In Study 1a, ideal self-congruence affects emotional brand attachment and in turn emotional brand attachment affects compulsive buying behaviour and external trash-talking. The mediation analysis indicates that emotional brand attachment mediates the relationships. Study 1b offers support to the results of Study 1a.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, this study is useful for policymakers seeking to regulate and prevent excessive consumerism. For marketers, they should understand that brand attachment leads to compulsive buying and external trash-talking, which may provide immediate benefit for the brand or the firm. However, marketers should understand that these two negative behaviours may harm the firm image and consumers’ well-being in the long run.

Social implications

Apart from practical implications, firms should consider alleviating compulsive buying, as it is harmful to society. Similarly, excessive external trash-talking may lead to physical aggression. Consumers expect firms to be socially responsible. Thus, firms should start conducting activities that promote responsible shopping and reduce external trash-talking.

Originality/value

The study highlights a dark side of ideal self-congruence and brand attachment. The results suggest that ideal self-congruence with the help of emotional brand attachment predicts compulsive buying behaviour and external trash-talking. This may not only damage brand image but also the consumers’ well-being.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Tracey Oliver, Joan Murphy and Sylvia Cox

People with dementia who feel included in decisions about their care show higher well‐being and positive adjustment to accepting care than those who feel their family make…

Abstract

People with dementia who feel included in decisions about their care show higher well‐being and positive adjustment to accepting care than those who feel their family make decisions for them (Bourgeois, 1991). Most carers want to involve the person with dementia in decision‐making and care arrangements, but many struggle because of the communication and cognitive problems associated with the condition. Research examined whether the Talking Mats framework could help people with dementia and their family carers feel more involved in decisions about managing their daily living. Eighteen couples (person with dementia and family carer) were asked to discuss how the person with dementia was managing their daily living activities using the Talking Mats framework (Condition A), and when having a typical conversation (Condition B). Each couple then completed a brief questionnaire separately to measure how involved they felt in both types of discussion. Both the person with dementia and their family carer felt more involved in discussions about managing daily living when using the Talking Mats framework than when having a typical conversation. Qualitative analysis of all discussions also offered insight into what people with dementia who are still living at home are managing in relation to their daily living. The study will contribute in a practical way to the current debate on how to involve people with dementia meaningfully in service planning. This will have implications for the organisation, delivery, and improvement of services to people with dementia.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Mona Önnestam

The Swedish Dyslexia Campaign had over 70 collaborators. One important collaborator was The Swedish Library of Talking Books and Braille (TPB), which invested a great deal…

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Abstract

The Swedish Dyslexia Campaign had over 70 collaborators. One important collaborator was The Swedish Library of Talking Books and Braille (TPB), which invested a great deal of effort and money in the campaign. In a short‐term evaluation, the result was not quite on a par with the effort but, on the other hand, changing an attitude is not done in a hurry. TPB works through the local libraries and schools, by supporting them with different information materials and interlibrary loans. Its task, to spread the information of talking books, could very well support the campaign task. Subsequently TPB did not have to start new activities. It did what it was already good at, but it did more of it and with a certain focus.

Details

New Library World, vol. 100 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Francois Marticotte, Manon Arcand and Damien Baudry

This study aims to build on the notion of brand evangelism developed by Becerra and Badrinarayanan (2013) by examining how brand relationship variables regarding one brand…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build on the notion of brand evangelism developed by Becerra and Badrinarayanan (2013) by examining how brand relationship variables regarding one brand (i.e. brand loyalty, brand community identification and self-brand connection) influence oppositional referrals to a rival brand (i.e. desire to harm and trash-talking) in the high definition (HD) videogame console industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of online communities devoted to video gaming was conducted using a sample of 809 respondents, all owners of either a PlayStation or an Xbox.

Findings

The results show that the desire to harm the rival brand is strongly and positively associated to participation in trash-talking. Brand loyalty is connected to both dimensions of oppositional brand referrals. Consumers’ connection with the brand affects trash-talking only indirectly through the desire to harm. No association is found between identification with the brand community and oppositional brand referrals.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate the mechanism linking brand relationship variables regarding a focal brand with consumers’ disparagement of a rival brand, showing that a desire to harm plays a central role. Just as the desire for retaliation drives negative word-of-mouth in the context of an unsatisfactory experience with a brand (Grégoire and Fisher, 2006), the desire to harm drives trash-talking against a rival brand by brand evangelists. This study improves our understanding of the relationships consumers build with their preferred brands and how this relationship may influence their rejection of competing brands with which they do not have direct experience.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Magnus Söderlund and Jan Mattsson

This paper aims to examine the impact of thinking about an event as an antecedent to subsequent talk about this event with others (i.e. word-of-mouth). Thinking has been a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of thinking about an event as an antecedent to subsequent talk about this event with others (i.e. word-of-mouth). Thinking has been a neglected variable in word-of-mouth research, despite the fact that several conceptual arguments indicate that thinking is likely to enhance talking. Here, the thinking–talking association is examined in the context of service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with a critical incident method, and the main variables were measured with questionnaire items.

Findings

Thinking about a service encounter – after it has been completed – had a positive influence on subsequent talk to others about the encounter. The association was mediated by the memorability of the service encounter and the extent to which what had happened had been subject to rehearsal with the purpose of telling others about it. In addition, with respect to antecedents of consumer thinking, the results indicate that service encounter incongruity had a special role in why the consumer thinks about encounters after they have been completed.

Originality/value

The findings should be seen in relation to the dominant position of customer satisfaction as an antecedent to word-of-mouth in the existing literature. The present results, however, indicate that satisfaction’s contribution to the variation in talking about the encounter was modest.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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