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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Heba Makram, Paul Sparrow and Kay Greasley

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of strategic actors in multinational organisations and to contribute to our understanding of how multinational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of strategic actors in multinational organisations and to contribute to our understanding of how multinational companies articulate and define talent management and how – or what – they perceive its value to be.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an empirical research study in which data were collected through 50 in-depth interviews across five multinational companies, conducted at a regional level across ten countries. Participants in the study were strategic actors representing two groups of managers/leaders (HR and talent management system designers and business leaders who are directly involved in the implementation of talent management).

Findings

The absence of a formal talent management definition led to the emergence of different views and interpretations of what it is. It was viewed as a bundle, or set, of management ideologies manifested in all HR-related practices across four key areas: hiring the right talent, performance management, succession planning and development and retention. Performance management acted as the cornerstone. Talent management strategies displayed little participation for both system designers and implementers and distinct patterns of mystification, technologization and concretisation. The language of value was uncommonly used but provoked different ways of thinking about the role and meaning of talent management.

Practical implications

The strategic actors in the talent system continue to see talent management in narrow functional and HR process terms. However, by bundling these HR functions and processes together, it is evident that they can be encouraged to recast their activity in a broader strategic narrative. Borrowing the notions and theories of value and value creation, and investigating talent management through this lens, should help to surface interesting insights into how talent management might be defined in practice, and how the language of value may in future be used to understand what talent management really is.

Originality/value

The global study underpinning this paper attempts to deconstruct the understanding that strategic actors have about talent management from an empirical base. It contributes to the conceptual development of the talent management discourse by revealing the logics being pursued and address the definitional problem currently evidenced in the literature. It also provides direction for future research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Alan J. Fish and Jack Wood

This paper aims to highlight dysfunctional multi-stakeholder relations and negative business outcomes, evidenced in lose/lose results, exacerbated by failure to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight dysfunctional multi-stakeholder relations and negative business outcomes, evidenced in lose/lose results, exacerbated by failure to acknowledge strategic business focus as a means to redress problematic business thinking and practice amongst key leadership teams associated with achieving balance between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The reframed strategic business focus has been developed using Eastern philosophy and Western organization theory and refers to four case examples of dysfunctional business thinking and practice.

Findings

Strategic business focus results from an interdependent and complementary positive mediating relationship between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility, which is moderated by organization culture (organization core values, including shared value) and strategic human resource management (talent and mindset).

Research limitations/implications

Strategic business focus as proposed has not been empirically tested but seeks to address a conceptualization that competing business and stakeholder agendas are interdependent and complementary.

Practical implications

Strategic business focus seeks to redress traditional win/lose and lose/lose business outcomes, by supporting win/win results, represented by shared value amongst multi-stakeholders.

Social implications

Strategic business focus seeks to provide a means whereby corporate social responsibility, particularly the social contract, plays a key role in the decisions and practices of key leadership teams and the behaviour of corporate staff in host environments when seeking competitive advantage.

Originality/value

Eastern thinking and behaviour are usually undervalued in the western business literature, particularly in western business practice. Joint attention, however, may improve competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility agendas in support of diverse management practices, including shared value.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Rakesh Sharma and Jyotsna Bhatnagar

The purpose of this paper is to draw lessons on how building a talent management strategy based on competency profiling becomes a critical impact area within the field of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw lessons on how building a talent management strategy based on competency profiling becomes a critical impact area within the field of strategic HRM.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study discusses an Indian pharmaceutical organisation, the environment and the issues arising in context to talent management. The case discusses a well designed talent management strategy.

Findings

The talent mindset has helped the organisation in recruiting the best talent from the best pharmaceutical organisations. The attrition of the top and valued talent segment has come down. Some of the key positions have been filled through succession planning.

Research limitations/implications

The case study is in a lesser known but emerging sector of the Indian economy. The case has concentrated on attracting and developing and retaining key talent, it does not concentrate on developing average talent into key talent.

Practical implications

The implications lie in whether to grow talent or buy talent. What signal through a communication strategy should a HR manager give when determining for talent segmentation? How to develop talent and retain employees when there are not challenging options available in the internal labour market?

Originality/value

This paper provides insights to HR practitioners on how to attract, acquire and manage talent in a tight internal and external labour market. It also provides empirical support for, and theoretical understanding of, the strategic HRM literature on talent management theme.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Nacasius U. Ujah, Augustine Tarkom and Collins E. Okafor

Talented managers arguably remain quintessential to firm value and performance. While the literature offers evidence for the long-term orientation of talented managers…

Abstract

Purpose

Talented managers arguably remain quintessential to firm value and performance. While the literature offers evidence for the long-term orientation of talented managers, there is a paucity of evidence on the short-term performance of managers. Here, we examine the relationship between managerial talent and working capital management (WCM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study primarily employs a panel fixed-effect method controlling for firm-year and firm-industry for non-financial and non-utility firms for the years 1980 through 2016. Also, the authors control of potential bias that may impact the result. These controls include social capital, financial constraints and tests for endogeneity and spurious correlation.

Findings

The authors find the association between managerial talent and WCM to be positive and significant. The results indicate that talented managers have a higher cash conversion cycle. The empirical evidence still holds after controlling for social capital, religiosity and financial constraints. Also, the evidence still holds by employing an interaction term between Tobin's Q as a proxy for investment opportunities and talented managers.

Practical implications

The finding may lend credence to executive contracts. Human nature, by default, is only vested on a net benefit for self-aggrandization. Self-aggrandization can be evident through structures in managerial contracts. These contracts usually tie consequences to long-term growths. If a benefit is offered based on short-term operational goals, talented managers may do more to the management of working capital.

Originality/value

In the managerial talent literature, talents reflect a holistic picture of one that can succeed in both the short-term and long-term goals of a company. Here, the authors show that talented managers are inefficient in meeting short-term goal – working capital management. Thus, the authors add to the research by providing evidence that talented managers are myopic.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Pradeep Sahay

The purpose of this article is to examine the applicability of design thinking to the strategic role of talent acquisition in organizations. While design thinking has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the applicability of design thinking to the strategic role of talent acquisition in organizations. While design thinking has become part of popular lexicon in contemporary design and engineering practice, as well as business and management, its principles can be seamlessly applied across multiple disciplines and industries. The premise is that by knowing about the process and the methods that designers use to ideate, and by understanding how designers approach problem solving, individuals and businesses will be better able to connect with and invigorate their ideation processes to take innovation to a higher level.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was based on empirical research drawn from the authors > 20 years of experience in the industry as also secondary research, which has been appropriately referenced in the attached article.

Findings

The process of developing talent relationships forces managers to develop a more outward-looking view, staying on top of cutting-edge trends, building their company’s image and staying in sync with customer expectations. This is but the essence of the design thinking methodology – taking insights from people at the various stages, touch points of the process and build from the outside-in rather than from the inside-out.

Originality/value

The article is an attempt to articulate the challenges that confront organizations today as they compete for talent in the changing talent marketplace. Hopefully, the document will elevate some awareness and discourse on the subject and finally concretize on a roadmap that turns its talent acquisition into a strategic advantage with visible impact on the bottom-line. In essence, the article is about creating innovative efficiencies within the recruiting function.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Jyoti Joshi Pant and Vijaya Venkateswaran

The purpose of this paper is to identify talent segments within the millennial generation based on performance and intention to stay and differentiate them in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify talent segments within the millennial generation based on performance and intention to stay and differentiate them in terms of their expectations. Based on results, the paper proposes a customized approach to talent management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a mixed methodology, including 11 exploratory focus group discussions, followed by a survey involving 1,065 employees from nine information technology and business process management companies.

Findings

The paper creates a framework of talent segments (performing loyals, performing movers, developing loyals and developing movers) that have different values for the organization. Significant differences are observed in their PC expectations from the manager, PC expectations related to career growth and development and PC expectations related to job and work environment.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers faced constraints in obtaining actual performance data from the organizations; therefore, a self-perception report of performance was used.

Practical implications

Organizations’ talent-management strategy must acknowledge and understand the differences in PC expectations of talent segments and offer tailored TM programs for maximum impact.

Social implications

The paper challenges the old assumption of a uniform psychological contract (PC) that has guided the talent management strategy. Every talent segment has value and must be viewed on continuum rather than a binary construct of “Talent or no talent.”

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies which explores how the perception of PC expectations differs between talent segments. It contributes to literature on talent segments, PC and the millennial generation.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Lesley Uren

The purpose of this paper is to understand what talent management might need to look like to meet the future needs of organizations and the requirements of the upcoming…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what talent management might need to look like to meet the future needs of organizations and the requirements of the upcoming generation of talented individuals. The author, from specialist consulting and executive search firm Jackson Samuel, shares findings into how organizations can improve their performance by adopting a more strategic and personalized approach to talent management.

Design/methodology/approach

Jackson Samuel spoke to senior HR people from 44 companies based in the UK and internationally, and also to 110 talented individuals across the length of the talent pipeline – university students, graduate trainees, middle managers and more senior talented executives. Focus groups and in‐depth interviews were conducted and questionnaires were completed. Analysis involved a combination of both quantitative and qualitative methods and market segmentation.

Findings

Businesses can significantly improve their bottom‐line performance by using a segmented approach to talent management.

Originality/value

The research shows that organizations that understand what their most talented individuals want from their relationship with their employer, and then segment their talent population and differentiate the Employee Value Proposition (EVP) for them, deliver up to 66 percent higher total shareholder return (over a five‐year period) than those organizations that do not.

Practical implications

Talent segmentation will allow organizations to get a greater degree of differentiation in the following pragmatic and simple ways: it helps an organization choose who to focus on (key value‐generating talent) and to create definitions for these different populations of talent; and it enables organizations to really understand what the talented individuals within each population want from their relationship with the organization.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Thomas McGuire and Linda Brenner

Abstract

Details

Building Business Value through Talent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-116-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Fanxing Meng, Xiaomei Wang, Huajiao Chen, Jin Zhang, Wei Yang, Jin Wang and Quanquan Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of organizational culture (OC) on talent management (TM) by a case study of a real estate company.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of organizational culture (OC) on talent management (TM) by a case study of a real estate company.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of case study is adopted in the present study.

Findings

The authors present four propositions. The first is OC has an effect on TM. The second is a new conceptual model of TM. The third is a 4-P pattern to identify and develop the talent. The fourth is to adopt both the spiritual and material satisfactions that retain the talent.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of this study is embedded in the case study method, which is not sufficient to represent the totality. The other limitation is that the issue of cohesion and team efficacy of talents is not considered. This study argues the relationship between OC and TM and expands the existing TM and OC theory. The effect of professional idealism is emphasized on in the process of TM. Talent can be retained firmly within the organization through the methods of rebuilding and strengthening OC.

Originality/value

A conceptual model of TM, 4-P pattern of evaluation and the operational mean to retain the talent is introduced.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Asuman Matongolo, Francis Kasekende and Sam Mafabi

The purpose of this paper is to examine, empirically the relationship between employer branding attributes of reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine, empirically the relationship between employer branding attributes of reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and development on talent retention in institutions of higher learning in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained form 218 respondents from two public universities. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling were employed to analyze the data.

Findings

The paper has two major findings: first, CFA maintained three dimensions of employer branding, namely; reward strategy, people orientedness and; leadership and development; and second, only reward strategy and people orientedness emerged as significant predictors of talent retention.

Originality/value

The results suggest that institutions of higher learning that embrace reward people orientedness strategies as measures for employer branding succeed in retaining their employees for longer.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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