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Article

Folke J. Glastra and Martha Meerman

The lack of career movement of members of ethnic minority groups in work organizations has been widely documented. The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into…

Abstract

Purpose

The lack of career movement of members of ethnic minority groups in work organizations has been widely documented. The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into conditions for the realization of diversity goals in the case of talent development.

Design/methodology/approach

In a case study of management development in the Dutch national tax administration, the practice of fostering vertical mobility of ethnic minority personnel through diversity management has been analysed. The authors make use of theories regarding effective diversity management and career advancement of ethnic minority employees. Data were collected through semi‐structured interviews with 12 participants in the management development course, and a further 25 functionaries involved in the project.

Findings

With regard to diversity management as a means of fostering talent development of ethnic minorities, the authors come to the conclusion that key success factors mentioned in the literature such as top level commitment and strategic integration, are insufficient and overrated conditions. More important are “non‐issues” in the formulation of diversity strategies, organizational alignment of relevant organizational players, strategic coherence and organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications

The case study design used in this research facilitates case‐sensitive analysis, but is limited in estimations of validity and explanatory strength of factors mentioned in the literature, as it is in generalizing across organizations.

Practical implications

Interventions aimed at fostering ethnic diversity in talent development should start with precise analysis of cultural and organizational conditions and processes underpinning standard practices of talent and career development, and not only seek strategic integration and top management commitment but arrange for broad‐based organizational alignment.

Originality/value

While there are many theoretical and normative models tracing diversity outcomes to organizational conditions and diversity management strategies, there is a dearth of empirical studies in this field. The case study explores the merits of these models and adds new insights on an empirical basis.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Thomas N. Garavan, Ronan Carbery and Andrew Rock

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of talent development, define its scope and identify the issues involved in formulating talent development strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of talent development, define its scope and identify the issues involved in formulating talent development strategies in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the relatively scant and fragmented literature on talent development processes.

Findings

The literature review revealed that talent development is usually discussed as part of a wider talent management process. The literature highlights issues concerning who is the talent to be developed, what competencies should be developed, who drives development, what is the appropriate pace of development and what is the architecture to support the development.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is solely theoretical in nature; however, it does identify gaps for further research.

Practice implications

The paper raises a number of important questions that should be considered by organisations when they engage in talent development.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a perceived gap in the literature and highlights the issues that come within the terrain of talent development.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article

Zara Whysall, Mike Owtram and Simon Brittain

The transformational changes to business environments brought about by the fourth industrial revolution create a perfect storm for strategic human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The transformational changes to business environments brought about by the fourth industrial revolution create a perfect storm for strategic human resource management, prompting a need to explore the implications of this context for talent management theory and practice. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with HR directors and senior leaders within engineering-led organisations to explore current challenges experienced across each stage of the talent pipeline: attraction and recruitment, training and development, career development, talent mobility and succession planning.

Findings

The speed of technological change brought about by Industry 4.0 had created a significant gap between current capability of employees and the rapidly evolving requirements of their roles, prompting a need to consider new and more effective approaches to talent development. Middle managers are increasingly recognised as overlooked critical talent within this context of unprecedented change, given their essential role in change management. In addition, whilst lateral hiring remains a common talent management practice, in the case of Industry 4.0 this equates to fighting a war for talent that does not exist.

Practical implications

This study suggests that there is a need for evolution of talent management theory and practice towards a more dynamic, systems-thinking orientation, acknowledging the interrelated nature of different talent management activities.

Originality/value

This paper provides an in-depth insight into the impact of the unprecedented change brought about by Industry 4.0 on contemporary talent management practice, considering how theory and practice might need to evolve to enable individuals and organisations to keep up with the rate of technological change.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Debbie Craig

The world of work is shifting from traditional career paths, to relentless change, leaner structures, evolving roles and a need to find meaning through the work the author…

Abstract

Purpose

The world of work is shifting from traditional career paths, to relentless change, leaner structures, evolving roles and a need to find meaning through the work the author do. A new skill-set is required to survive and thrive in the new economy. The purpose of this paper is to explore how learning programs focused on personal and career empowerment can build these skills, increase engagement, enhance performance and impact culture positively.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarises these new skill-sets required and raises critical questions: how do we create an environment for self and career empowerment? How do we act as catalysts for cultural and social transformation? It then outlines an approach to discovering the answers based on experiences facilitating I am Talent workshops for personal and career empowerment. Key insights and suggestions for personal and career empowerment topics and tools are highlighted.

Findings

The paper goes on to share the post-intervention impact results of a case study organisation, on culture, engagement, learning and performance.

Practical implications

The paper covers some practical skill areas that can significantly improve work and life results, in a world that is dynamic, uncertain and continuously changing.

Social implications

Millennials come with whole new set of expectations and preferences in the way they interact with work. In a South African context, this is compounded by our educational and skills crisis resulting in many work entrants not being sufficiently prepared for the new world of work.

Originality/value

The learning programme is based on a book, I am Talent, by the author of this paper and is a unique approach to building personal and career empowerment.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article

Renu Dalal and Mesut Akdere

There is a critical need to understand current talent development (TD) practices as well as developing a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a critical need to understand current talent development (TD) practices as well as developing a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different future for TD. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the existing literature on TD, explore the fundamental role of TD in organizations and identify gaps for future directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on TD.

Findings

Following themes are identified in selected TD articles: varied TD definitions, theoretical perspective for investigating TD, TD practices and effects and implications on training and development. The literature review identifies two levels of TD practices: organizational level and individual level.

Practical implications

The field of TD is rapidly changing because of the accelerating integration of technology and information into daily work environment. There is a critical need to understand current TD practices as well as to develop a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different future for TD. Scope and boundaries of TD need to be set, so that practitioners can apply the right practice at the right time.

Originality/value

The paper presents the conceptual boundaries of TD in the current existing literature and identifies the gaps.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review is performed utilising studies published on the topic from 2008 to 2019 in various research databases.

Findings

The findings highlighted various talent management contributions and challenges in the African context. They further revealed major issues with the nature of research method adopted in talent management research in Africa. Moreover, contextually, apart from Southern Africa sub-region, talent management research is highly under-researched in the North African, West African and Eastern African sub-regions of the continent. Therefore, talent management research in Africa can be described as being at an embryonic stage.

Practical implications

Effective talent management has significant transformative and growth power through its varied positive contributions. Talent management in Africa is faced with numerous organisational and macro-level challenges and requires attention from relevant stakeholders, if African talents are to be harnessed to facilitate the development of the continent.

Originality/value

This systematic review on talent management is the first of its kind focusing solely on Africa. Also, this study contributes further evidence by proposing a multilevel talent management model based on the synthesised evidence since multilevel research in the field of talent management is very limited.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article

Wee Ling Lim and Roziah Mohd Rasdi

The purpose of this study is to explore the challenges faced by married women professionals in the private sector and the factors affecting their decisions in leaving the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the challenges faced by married women professionals in the private sector and the factors affecting their decisions in leaving the workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used in this study. Data were obtained using a purposive sampling method in selecting ten married women professionals based on the inclusion criteria for this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and the whole interview sessions were audio recorded. Thematic analysis using the constant comparative method was used in interpreting the data.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that majority of the married women professionals leaving workforce are affected by “pushed out” factors such as workplace inflexibility, long working hours, high volume of work than “opt-out” factors, which focus on the biological and psychological “pulls” that lure women back into their traditional roles of motherhood. Most of the married women professionals interviewed had no intention to return to the workforce and had lost confidence to join back the workforce.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved married women professionals in the private sector only. As a qualitative study, it limits to voice and views of these particular subjects only and could not be generalised to other group of women.

Practical implications

The findings from this study shall enlighten all parties involved such as women professionals, HR managers and private sector organisations in strategies and plan of action towards minimising the talent drain of women professionals.

Originality/value

This paper offers new insight into debating the opt-out or pushed out factors influencing married women professionals’ decisions in leaving the workforce. It provides voice and views of women professionals who faced a predicament in making a decision about their career development.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Priyanka Anand

The aim of this case study is to explore and understand the talent management innovations, practices and processes in a major telecoms company in India, Bharti Airtel.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this case study is to explore and understand the talent management innovations, practices and processes in a major telecoms company in India, Bharti Airtel.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a study of the organization's talent management practices and a survey of executives, including in‐depth interviews with two key talent management executives, and a study of employees' perceptions of the organization's talent management and its impact.

Findings

The research revealed the organization's vision and methods for integrating talent management processes. Talent management is an important element of the development process for employees and is an organization‐wide practice. The process of effective management of the talent pool has led to enhanced employee engagement and reduced attrition and proportionately increased the average tenure of employees. The talent management strategy and processes have contributed in varying degrees to development and growth of employees.

Research limitations/implications

This research is an elementary study posing the need for further research into the organization‐wide practice of managing talent.

Originality/value

The research addresses how talent management is perceived in a successful organization and examines the recognition and growing acceptance of talent management practices. Talent management is widely adopted by multinationals operating in India, however, most Indian organizations are either currently or soon to adopt the practice. They are dealing with issues such as whether talent management is an offshoot of HR processes or an independent developmental process, and how it will create a competitive advantage and enhance employee engagement. This case study shows how the adoption of talent management processes on an organization‐wide scale – not confined to the HR function – has helped the organization improve retention and development.

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Article

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on global talent management by examining how multinational corporations (MNCs) from developed and emerging economies manage…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on global talent management by examining how multinational corporations (MNCs) from developed and emerging economies manage talented employees in other emerging economies. Specifically, it aims to understand why MNCs from developed economies are likely to face lower levels of challenge than MNCs from emerging economies when translating corporate-level talent management strategies to their subsidiaries located in emerging economies and how local contextual factors influence the translation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertakes a matched-case comparison of two MNCs, one from a developed economy and the other from an emerging economy, that operate in the emerging economy of Thailand. Evidence was obtained from semi-structured interviews field visits and a review of archival documents and Web resources.

Findings

Based on the obtained evidence, this paper proposes that MNCs from developed economies tend to face challenges in terms of skill shortages, and these challenges affect their translation of talent management strategies to the subsidiary level. By contrast, MNCs from emerging economies tend to face challenges in terms of both skill shortages and the liability of origin (LOR) (i.e. weak employer branding) in the translation process. Both groups of MNCs are likely to develop talent management practices at the subsidiary level to address the challenge of successfully competing in the context of emerging economies.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this research is its methodology. Because this research is based on a matched-case comparison of an MNC from a developed economy and an MNC from an emerging economy, both of which operate in the emerging economy of Thailand, it does not claim generalizability to all MNCs and to other emerging economies. Rather, the results of this research should lead to further discussion of how MNCs from developed and emerging economies translate corporate-level talent management strategies into subsidiary-level practices to survive in other emerging economies. However, one important issue here is that there may be a tension between the use of expatriates and local top managers at MNCs’ subsidiaries located in other emerging economies as drivers for knowledge sourcing in that the importance of expatriates may diminish over time as the subsidiaries located in those economies age (Dahms, 2019). In this regard, future research in the area of global talent management should pay special attention to this issue. The other important issue here is that it is possible that the two case study MNCs are very different from one another because of their organizational development stage, history and current globalization stage. Thus, this issue may also influence the types of talent management strategies and practices that the two case study MNCs have developed in different countries. In particular, MNCs from emerging economies (ICBC) may not have developed their global HR strategies, as they have not yet operated globally as in the case of MNCs from developed economies (Citibank). This can be another important issue for future research. Additionally, both MNCs examined in this research operate in the banking industry. This study, therefore, omits MNCs that operate in other industries such as the automobile industry and the hotel and resort industry. Future researchers can explore how both groups of MNCs in other industries translate their talent management strategies into practices when they operate in other emerging economies. Moreover, this study focuses only on two primary contextual factors, the skill-shortage problem and LOR; future research can explore other local contextual factors, such as the national culture, and their impact on the translation of talent management strategies into practices. Furthermore, quantitative studies that use large sample sizes of both groups of MNCs across industries might be useful in deepening our understanding of talent management. Finally, a comparison of talent management strategies and practices between Japanese MNCs and European MNCs that operate in Thailand would also be interesting.

Practical implications

The HR professionals and managers of MNCs that operate in emerging economies or of companies that aim to internationalize their business to emerging economies must pay attention to local institutional structures, including national skill formation systems, to successfully implement talent management practices in emerging economies. Additionally, in the case of MNCs from emerging economies, HR professionals and managers must understand the concept of LOR and look for ways to alleviate this problem to ensure the success of talent management in both developed economies and other emerging economies.

Social implications

This paper provides policy implications for the government in Thailand and in other emerging economies where the skill-shortage problem is particularly severe. Specifically, these governments should pay attention to solving the problem of occupation-level skill shortages to alleviate the severe competition for talented candidates among firms in the labor market.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the prior literature on talent management in several ways. First, this paper is among the first empirical, qualitative papers that aim to extend the literature on global talent management by focusing on how MNCs from different groups of countries (i.e. developed economies and emerging economies) manage talented employees in the emerging economy of Thailand. Second, this paper demonstrates that the institutional structures of emerging economies play an important role in shaping the talent management practices adopted by the subsidiaries of MNCs that operate in these countries. In this regard, comparative institutionalism theory helps explain the importance of recognizing institutional structures in emerging economies for the purpose of developing effective talent management practices. Finally, there is scarce research on talent management in the underresearched country of Thailand. This study should, therefore, assist managers who wish to implement corporate-to-subsidiary translation strategies in Thailand and other emerging economies.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Article

Norma D’Annunzio-Green

This paper aims to introduce the theme issue and the rationale for the theme issue question: Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce the theme issue and the rationale for the theme issue question: Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper re-visits the conclusions of an earlier theme issue on aspects of talent management and reflects on their contemporary relevance with reference to the emerging concept of strategic talent management (STM).

Findings

This paper identifies the cornerstones of STM: concern for employee well-being; developing positive relationships and positive work attitudes; being authentic and building trust and sincerity; and providing organisational support.

Originality/value

This paper outlines the focus of theme issue and the approach taken that incorporates conceptual papers together with academic and practitioner viewpoints, perspectives, consultation and roundtable discussion. This paper observes that the issue reflects the views of multi-level line managers across a number of functions, including senior leaders, middle managers, supervisors, managers and marketing managers of human resources and that the papers all have a strong action orientation as a platform for learning, conversation and debate.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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