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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Knut R. Fossum, Jean C. Binder, Tage K. Madsen, Wenche Aarseth and Bjorn Andersen

The purpose of this paper is to identify and complete the existing lack of quantitative data at the crossroads between organizational support (OS) practices and project…

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1686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and complete the existing lack of quantitative data at the crossroads between organizational support (OS) practices and project management success in global projects (GPs) and discuss implication of the results in perspective of the theory–practice gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on classical organizational theory and GP knowledge areas, a survey addressing GP practitioners was designed. This paper focuses on OS practices as success factors and addresses a subset of the survey (1,170 respondents across 74 countries).

Findings

OS practices included in the study were found to have high importance for managerial success. OS practices for selection and training of team members show significant correlation with project efficiency but have low adaptation in many organizations. Statistically significant correlations were found to be weaker than expected, indicating that the relation between OS practices (as success factors) and project efficiency (as success criteria) is more complex than expected.

Research limitations/implications

The work constitutes opinion-based research and is vulnerable to variations in OS practices and the definition of success in different organizations and industries. The granularity level of the theoretical framework brought about relative high-level survey questions and may impact the applicability of the results.

Practical implications

To improve the efficiency of GPs, better implementation of OS practices for selection processes and training personnel has been suggested.

Originality/value

The theoretical alignment of classical organizational variables with GP knowledge areas and associated practices provides an original approach to the “theory–practice gap” discourse.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Yee Kwan Tang

This study aims at providing exploratory insights into the initiative and capabilities of Chinese SMEs to develop and utilize diverse networks to support…

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592

Abstract

This study aims at providing exploratory insights into the initiative and capabilities of Chinese SMEs to develop and utilize diverse networks to support internationalization. Such network development and utilization efforts are fundamental to the analysis and explanation of Chinese firms’ internationalization patterns and outcomes. Extending from the existing network studies in the Chinese context that generally put emphasis on strong‐tie and ethnic‐oriented networks, this paper investigates and explains explicitly the use and effects of both strong‐ and weak‐tie networks in the international development of Chinese SMEs. Indepth case studies on four rapidly internationalized Chinese SMEs are conducted. The case findings demonstrate that weak‐tie networks are essential to the firms’ business development in foreign markets; and were proactively developed and utilized in the course of the firms’ development. The cases also provide alternative perspectives to the beliefs and values underpinning strong‐tie networks presumed in existing literature. The findings draw attention to the changing business values and approaches of the Chinese firms aiming at developing internationally. Managerial implications concerning the significant influence of effective networking on internationalization are pinpointed.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Book part
Publication date: 31 January 2015

Tage Koed Madsen, Hans Eibe Sørensen and Rosalina Torres-Ortega

Market orientation is often mentioned as a key factor for the success of domestic and international activities, but our knowledge about differences in degrees of market…

Abstract

Market orientation is often mentioned as a key factor for the success of domestic and international activities, but our knowledge about differences in degrees of market orientation remains limited for firms that have varying degrees of international activities. In particular, the literature is very sparse with regard to studies of newly established firms. Our study empirically explores this gap examining how different types of new ventures adopt two strategic components of market orientation – customer orientation and competitor orientation. Our empirical evidence is based on responses from CEOs of 249 Danish manufacturing firms that are categorized into four groups, depending on their degree of international operations within the first three years. We demonstrate that the most internationally oriented firms seem to be the most market oriented in general. They are significantly more competitor-oriented than domestically oriented firms, but the results regarding customer orientation are more mixed. Interestingly, we find indications that the strategic emphasis on customer orientation may be higher for firms with domestic operations than for those with limited international operations. We discuss implications for research and managers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Erik S. Rasmussan, Tage Koed Madsen and Felicitas Evangelista

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the…

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3549

Abstract

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the case studies of five Danish and Australian born global companies. Considers different global models and their limitations. Presents the findings of recent surveys in this area. Concludes that internationalization has not been the primary objective in the founding process and gives direction for further research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2017

Mohammad Javadinia Azari, Tage Koed Madsen and Øystein Moen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedent and outcomes of different types of innovation as complementary growth strategies, which may enable exporting…

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1184

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedent and outcomes of different types of innovation as complementary growth strategies, which may enable exporting small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to achieve success in export markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based upon a quantitative survey on Norwegian exporting SMEs. A total of 380 questionnaires were received representing 16.8 per cent response rate. A structural equation modelling analysis is carried out on the sample.

Findings

The study finds positive and significant associations between the firm’s growth ambition and the pursuance of product and business model innovations. Moreover, the firm’s export degree and scope has a significant and positive association with its product innovation strategy, but the association with its business model innovation is significantly negative.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s findings indicate that future studies should incorporate different types of innovation strategies since their associations with export performance differ substantially. Treating innovation as a general construct appears to be too simplistic.

Practical implications

The study’s results indicate that focus on product innovation enhances the export performance of SMEs, but that focus on business model innovation has a negative impact. The latter may be too costly and distract focus from the firm’s core competences, whereas product innovation can be assumed to provide further competitive strength.

Originality/value

By taking a holistic approach towards innovation, this study addresses a gap in the literature on innovation and exporting in SMEs in order to investigate the association between different types of innovation-based growth strategies and the firms’ export prosperity.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Ann Elida Eide, Øystein Moen, Tage Koed Madsen and Mohammad Javadinia Azari

The main purpose of this study is to increase the scholarly understanding of managerial growth aspirations in small firms. Research has shown that managers' aspirations…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to increase the scholarly understanding of managerial growth aspirations in small firms. Research has shown that managers' aspirations are important to ensure firms' growth, but researchers know less of where their aspirations come from and how variation in these aspirations shapes organizational outcomes. By focusing on two growth strategies of particular importance for small firms – innovation and internationalization – the authors map out how managers' ambitious aspirations may create negative organizational effects and also how they may counteract such effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs structural equation modeling (SEM) on a sample of 249 Norwegian small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that managerial experience is associated with high aspirations as well as high change effectiveness on the managerial team. The authors find that ambitious growth aspirations are associated with exploration in the form of radical innovation but also lead to reduced employee well-being. Managers' level of perceived change effectiveness, on the other hand, is positively associated with radical innovation and also raises employee well-being.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the positive and negative effects of managerial aspirations on different organizational outcomes. Further, it shows that managerial teams working effectively together in the face of change is important for the well-being of employees. Results confirm the positive relationship between aspirations for growth and applied growth strategies in organizations. The data sample is, however, extracted from one country only, and the authors cannot exclude the possibility that findings will be different elsewhere.

Practical implications

To ensure successful growth, managers should combine ambitious aspirations with attention to the top management team's (TMT) experience levels and change effectiveness. Assessment of possible needs for development and adjustments could ensure growth processes with limited negative effects for employee well-being.

Originality/value

By distinguishing between growth through international sales (exploitation) and growth through a more change-intensive strategy of radical innovation (exploration), the authors investigate how variations in managerial aspirations and perceptions influence organizational growth processes. This paper paints a unique picture of how managers can be both the cause and cure of employee well-being in change-demanding situations.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Arild Aspelund, Tage Koed Madsen and Øystein Moen

This review aims to focus on the phenomenon of infant firms that operate internationally right from or close to inception, so‐called international new ventures (INVs) or…

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8244

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to focus on the phenomenon of infant firms that operate internationally right from or close to inception, so‐called international new ventures (INVs) or born global firms. It also aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature on INVs from the time when such firms emerged in the literature in the early 1990s up until today.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a systematic review of top journals within entrepreneurship, marketing and management over the years 1992‐2004. The focus is primarily on studies with empirical evidence and the review is narrative in nature. The study presents and discusses findings related to the founding of the firm, organizational features, environmental factors, and their influence on market strategy and firm performance.

Findings

The study finds great heterogeneity on the factors examined within this relatively narrow defined group of firms. This leads the study to conclude that normative linear models of international expansion render little explanatory and predictive value to the study of these firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study concludes that recent empirical findings on INVs offer insight beyond traditional models of internationalization, and that more theory driven research in the area is required. The paper suggests application of general theories of organizations on the INV phenomenon in an attempt to understand international expansion and market strategies of new firms.

Practical implications

The study represents a comprehensive review of the literature on INVs and serves well as an introduction to the field for students, managers and scholars.

Originality/value

The study offers a much needed recapitulation of the empirical evidence in a relatively new field of research. It offers guidance for future research in a field of research that is still in its infancy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Stephen Mark Rosenbaum, Tage Koed Madsen and Henrik Johanning

The purpose of this paper is to understand the process by which piggybacking partners attempt to overcome the challenges of interfirm diversity when entering foreign markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the process by which piggybacking partners attempt to overcome the challenges of interfirm diversity when entering foreign markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a longitudinal case study following the collaboration between a rider (a small software developer) and carrier (a global player in software solution distribution) as a means of co-creating value for global customers in the pharmaceutical industry.

Findings

The authors find that despite differential size and incongruent organizational cultures, top managers were still initially able to facilitate collaboration through various knowledge-sharing initiatives, but that these efforts were subsequently undermined by middle managers (due to misaligned incentives), which prevented both parties from reaping the gains of piggybacking on global markets.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have a number of implications for academics and practitioners alike. Theoretical implications include treating piggybacking as a special case of indirect exporting with particular challenges for knowledge exchange and trust building.

Practical implications

The authors offer managerial implications for reconciling divergent organizational cultures, partner selection and incentive alignment.

Originality/value

This appears to be the first paper to empirically assess the viability of piggybacking as a foreign entry mode by examining the crucial processes of knowledge sharing and trust development within piggybacking arrangements.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Tage Koed Madsen

This article shows the main results of a survey of 134 exportactivities in manufacturing firms in Denmark. It analyses theassociation between export performance on the one…

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1897

Abstract

This article shows the main results of a survey of 134 export activities in manufacturing firms in Denmark. It analyses the association between export performance on the one hand and export marketing policy, firm characteristics and market characteristics on the other hand. Bivariate and multivariate analyses are performed with the purpose of identifying critical export marketing success factors. Links to previous research are discussed and implications for export marketing management considered. The article concludes by discussing future research on successful export marketing management.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Muzaffer Bodur and Tage Koed Madsen

Looks at how cultural barriers presented many problems in theinitial forming of many organizations′ partnerships between Denmark andTurkey. Danish investments in the…

Abstract

Looks at how cultural barriers presented many problems in the initial forming of many organizations′ partnerships between Denmark and Turkey. Danish investments in the Turkish marketplace also suffered many casualties due to the same culture gap and Turkish family influences. Looks at the high inflation rates and political instability as contributors to unstable partnerships. There appears to be a real need for professional managers to build up strong relationships if business collaboration is to achieve mutual success.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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