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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Jeff Agner

Abstract

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A Guide to Healthcare Facility Dress Rehearsal Simulation Planning: Simplifying the Complex
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-555-5

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Panayiotis Zaphiris, Andri Loannou, Fernando Loizides and Christina Vasiliou

This paper aims to report work regarding the design, development and evaluation of a surface computing application to support collaborative decision making. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report work regarding the design, development and evaluation of a surface computing application to support collaborative decision making. The domain-independent application, the so-called Ideas Mapping, builds on the principle of affinity diagramming to allow participants to analyze a problem and brainstorm around possible solutions, while they actively construct a consensus artifact – a taxonomy of their ideas.

Design/methodology/approach

Ideas Mapping was designed using a user-centred approach. During idea generation, Ideas Mapping replicates physical post-it notes on a multi-touch tabletop. Additional functionality supports student collaboration and interaction around the organization of ideas into thematic categories associated with the problem at hand. The tool was evaluated in two studies using quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The paper reports on the functionality and user experience while interacting with the application. The paper also reports initial findings regarding the affordances of surface computing for collaborative decision making.

Originality/value

The studies reported give insides regarding the affordances of multi-touch tabletops to support collaborative decision making. Information regarding the user experience in using such applications is reported.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Carl O. DiNardo and Mary J. Snyder Broussard

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially available tabletop games can be effective tools to teach information literacy and present a list of best practices to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially available tabletop games can be effective tools to teach information literacy and present a list of best practices to improve instructor’s chances of success with this pedagogical method.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from two separate institutions with complementary experiences analyze the theory of game-based learning with tabletop games, present an example of game-based information literacy instruction in practice and suggest four best practices for this method of instruction.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that educators by combining sound pedagogical practices to connect the educational content to what rules of games ask of students can effectively find a balance between enthusiastic engagement and higher-order information literacy learning outcomes.

Practical implications

This paper can be used to guide librarians looking for creative and sound methods to engage students using tabletop games to teach information literacy.

Originality/value

The authors have unique theoretical and practical knowledge with joining pedagogy and tabletop games in the information literacy classroom. While there is a lot of literature on games in academic libraries, there is only one other paper on using a commercially available tabletop game to teach information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Taylor M. Kessner, Priyanka Parekh, Earl Aguliera, Luis E. Pérez Cortés, Kelly M. Tran, Sinem Siyahhan and Elisabeth R. Gee

This paper aims to explore how making tabletop board games elicited adolescents’ design thinking during their participation in a summer game design camp at their local library.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how making tabletop board games elicited adolescents’ design thinking during their participation in a summer game design camp at their local library.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leverages qualitative approaches to coding transcripts of participants’ talk. This study uses the design thinking framework from the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford University as provisional codes to identify and make sense of participants’ verbalized design activity.

Findings

This study found that the making context of designing tabletop board games elicited a high frequency of design talk in participants, evidenced by both quantitative and qualitative reports of the data. Additionally, participants in large measure obviated constraints on their design activity imposed by linear conceptions of the design thinking model this study introduces, instead of moving fluidly across design modes. Finally, participants’ prior experiences in both life and in regard to games significantly influenced their design study.

Originality/value

This study highlights the unique affordances of making-centric approaches to designing tabletop games in particular, such as participants’ quick and sustained engagement in the study of design. This study also highlights the need for conceptions of design thinking specific to designing games.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Alberto Battocchi, Ayelet Ben‐Sasson, Gianluca Esposito, Eynat Gal, Fabio Pianesi, Daniel Tomasini, Paola Venuti, Patrice Weiss and Massimo Zancanaro

Tabletop interfaces are a novel class of technologies that are particularly suited to support co‐located collaboration. The Collaborative Puzzle Game (CPG) is a tabletop

Abstract

Tabletop interfaces are a novel class of technologies that are particularly suited to support co‐located collaboration. The Collaborative Puzzle Game (CPG) is a tabletop interactive activity developed for fostering collaboration skills in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The CPG features an interaction rule called Enforced Collaboration (EC); in order to be moved, puzzle pieces must be touched and dragged simultaneously by the two players. Two studies were conducted to test the effect of EC on collaboration. In Study I, 70 typically developing boys were tested in pairs to characterise the way they respond to EC; in Study II, 16 boys with ASD were tested in pairs. Results suggest that EC has a generally positive effect on collaboration and is associated with more complex interactions. For children with ASD, the EC interaction rule was effective in triggering behaviours associated with co‐ordination of the task and negotiation.

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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A Guide to Healthcare Facility Dress Rehearsal Simulation Planning: Simplifying the Complex
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-555-5

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Cason Snow

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the genre of tabletop fantasy role‐playing games and provide guidance in building an initial collection.

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2047

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the genre of tabletop fantasy role‐playing games and provide guidance in building an initial collection.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of the paper is designed to present the development of tabletop fantasy role‐playing games in a historiographic model, tracing the history of these games from the 1970s to 2006. The second portion is a bibliographic essay and critique of several noteworthy fantasy role‐playing games, including analysis of the settings and systems of each game.

Findings

The paper provides a history of the development of fantasy role‐playing games and provides guidance on how to start a collection. The study recognizes a lack of academic research on the topic and seeks to provide a brief introduction.

Practical implications

The paper provides a clear concise history of role‐playing game development and balanced advice for librarians who wish to begin collecting role‐playing games.

Originality/value

This paper begins to fill the need for academic study of the subject and provides practical advice for collection development librarians.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

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25

Abstract

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

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40

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

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81

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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