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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2018

Vijay Viswanathan, Edward C. Malthouse, Ewa Maslowska, Steven Hoornaert and Dirk Van den Poel

The purpose of this paper is to study consumer engagement as a dynamic, iterative process in the context of TV shows. A theoretical framework involving the central…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study consumer engagement as a dynamic, iterative process in the context of TV shows. A theoretical framework involving the central constructs of brand actions, customer engagement behaviors (CEBs), and consumption is proposed. Brand actions of TV shows include advertising and firm-generated content (FGC) on social media. CEBs include volume, sentiment, and richness of user-generated content (UGC) on social media. Consumption comprises live and time-shifted TV viewing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study 31 new TV shows introduced in 2015. Consistent with the ecosystem framework, a simultaneous system of equations approach is adopted to analyze data from a US Cable TV provider, Kantar Media, and Twitter.

Findings

The findings show that advertising efforts initiated by the TV show have a positive effect on time-shifted viewing, but a negative effect on live viewing; tweets posted by the TV show (FGC) have a negative effect on time-shifted viewing, but no effect on live viewing; and negative sentiment from tweets posted by viewers (UGC) reduces time-shifted viewing, but increases live viewing.

Originality/value

Content creators and TV networks are faced with the daunting challenge of retaining their audiences in a media-fragmented world. Whereas most studies on engagement have focused on static firm-customer relationships, this study examines engagement from a dynamic, multi-agent perspective by studying interrelationships among brand actions, CEBs, and consumption over time. Accordingly, this study can help brands to quantify the effectiveness of their engagement efforts in terms of encouraging CEBs and eliciting specific TV consumption behaviors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Tao Sun

This paper aims to examine how parental mediation of children's television viewing varies among urban and rural children in China.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how parental mediation of children's television viewing varies among urban and rural children in China.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 1,056 children ages 6 to 14 in nine Chinese provinces was conducted. Independent sample t‐tests were performed to make rural‐urban comparisons. Correlation analyses were provided on the relationships between parental mediation styles and children's television usage, and between parental mediation styles and children's purchase request.

Findings

The paper finds that urban parents engage in more instructive mediation and restrictive mediation than rural parents. Urban parents use restrictive mediation the more often, while rural parents use co‐viewing the more frequently. Only urban children's television viewing has a significantly positive relationship with co‐viewing with their parents. In general, children's purchase request is positively related to parental mediation styles in rural and urban China (except for restrictive mediation in rural areas).

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on an analysis of secondary data. Future studies should adopt established scales of parental mediation styles for the Chinese context.

Practical implications

The findings should help public policy makers understand the dynamic parents‐children interactions with television, and help marketers find effective and efficient ways to reach young Chinese consumers.

Originality/value

The study represents a preliminary effort to examine the antecedents of television parental mediation, its occurrence, and its potential effects in the Chinese context.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2021

Rejikumar G., Ajay Jose, Sonia Mathew, Dony Peter Chacko and Aswathy Asokan-Ajitha

Social television (Social TV) viewing of live sports events is an emerging trend. The realm of transformative service research (TSR) envisions that every service…

Abstract

Purpose

Social television (Social TV) viewing of live sports events is an emerging trend. The realm of transformative service research (TSR) envisions that every service consumption experience must lead to consumer well-being. Currently, a full appreciation of the well-being factors obtained through Social TV viewing is lacking. This study aims to gain a holistic understanding of the concept of digital sports well-being obtained through live Social TV viewing of sports events.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group interviews were used to collect data from the 40 regular sports viewers, and the qualitative data obtained is analyzed thematically using NVivo 12. A post hoc verification of the identified themes is done to narrow down the most critical themes.

Findings

The exploration helped understand the concept of digital sports well-being (DSW) obtained through live Social TV sports spectating and identified five critical themes that constitute its formation. The themes that emerged were virtual connectedness, vividness, uncertainty reduction, online disinhibition and perceived autonomy. This study defines the concept and develops a conceptual model for DSW.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the body of knowledge in TSR, transformative sport service research, digital customer engagement, value co-creation in digital platforms, self-determination theory and flow theory. The qualitative study is exploratory, with participants’ views based on a single match in one particular sport, and as such, its findings are restrained by the small sample size and the specific sport. To extend this study’s implications, empirical research involving a larger and more diversified sample involving multiple sports Social TV viewing experiences would help better understand the DSW concept.

Practical implications

The research provides insights to Social TV live streamers of sporting events and digital media marketers about the DSW construct and identifies the valued DSW dimensions that could provide a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the exploration is the first attempt to describe the concept of DSW and identify associated themes.

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Jenni Romaniuk and Nicole Hartnett

This paper aims to investigate the relative influence of advertising and word of mouth (WOM) for new season TV programmes, both new and returning.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relative influence of advertising and word of mouth (WOM) for new season TV programmes, both new and returning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s longitudinal research design tracks individuals before and after possible exposure to advertising and/or positive WOM (PWOM) to model the effects of both paid versus earned media on behaviour.

Findings

This study provides contrary evidence to previous research that suggests that WOM has more influence on consumers than advertising. By controlling for viewers’ benchmark probabilities of viewing the TV programme, the effect of receiving PWOM becomes insignificant, whereas the effect of TV advertising remains unchanged. Because WOM is commonly exchanged between people with shared interests, it reaches an audience that is already highly disposed to view the TV programme.

Research limitations/implications

The findings implicate that we need to reinvestigate the power of WOM to avoid misattribution of effects. This study is only study in one category, which means replication and extension to more categories are needed. The limitations of the study include the inability to control for creative differences in the execution of programme promotions or examine possible cross-media synergies for multimedia campaigns.

Practical implications

Findings have implications for how much to invest in WOM-generating activities. Findings also have wider implications for cross-media research and media-mix models, as different media may reach audiences with differing predispositions to act.

Originality/value

This is one of the rare individual-level, longitudinal studies that investigate the influence of WOM in comparison to advertising.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Nicki Caret

Reports research by Sherbert Research on how children view the TV and how it fits into their lives, especially the differences between multichannel and terrestrial‐only…

Abstract

Reports research by Sherbert Research on how children view the TV and how it fits into their lives, especially the differences between multichannel and terrestrial‐only homes, and the impact of scheduling and of the electronic viewing guide (EVG) on viewing. Describes the research methodology, which was mainly qualitative, was based in four UK cities, and asked the older children in the study to keep a journal, plus photographs, to show their viewing tastes and habits, and their other activities. Finds that TV is an integral part of family life and is likely to develop still further, and that multichannel TV such as Sky has changed the face of children’s TV, with greatly increased choice, control and expectations on the part of children.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Gregory J. Mills

The current paper examines the relationships between watching television for various times of day and reading achievement for a subsample of third grade language minority…

Abstract

Purpose

The current paper examines the relationships between watching television for various times of day and reading achievement for a subsample of third grade language minority (LM) students compared to third grade students in general.

Methodology

The analysis uses ECLS-K 1998–99 data to first test for significant differences between the two samples, then further explores these relationships using separate OLS multiple regression models, while controlling for past reading achievements and socioeconomic variation.

Findings

Building on more nuanced versions of displacement theory, this paper finds a positive relationship between reading achievement and watching television after dinner on weekdays specifically for LM students. For the general sample, watching TV on weekends or weekdays at any time period has no relationship with reading achievement.

Originality/value

This research suggests the potential for TV or perhaps other media to act as a lingual- or cultural-learning facilitator for LM students, being positively tied to reading achievement. The paper’s unique focus on multimedia use and LM students makes it particularly applicable to educators and public policy officials tasked with confronting the reading skills gap for a growing LM student population.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

F. Bahar Ozdogan and M. Hakan Altintas

The purpose of this paper is to explore the moderating effects of parent‐child co‐viewing of TV and parents' discussion of content with children in the context of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the moderating effects of parent‐child co‐viewing of TV and parents' discussion of content with children in the context of the family's effect on children's skepticism towards TV advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 296 consumers aged 12 to 16 in Ankara was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Constructs were measured using established scales.

Findings

It was observed that the co‐viewing of advertisements with parents increased the family effect. On the other hand, discussion of advertising with parents reduced the family effect. The conclusion was that parent‐child co‐viewing of advertisements can alter the children's perceptions of advertisements through personal assessments.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and has limited generalizability as it has been conducted solely in one city, Ankara, Turkey. Any further research should include perspectives from other cities in Turkey and from other countries. In addition, frequency of TV viewing has not been taken into account. Further research could investigate gender differences and cohort effects on the issues investigated in this study.

Practical implications

The design of advertisements should include perceptions of both parents and children in order to convey meaningful messages in advertising. Furthermore, advertisers should take into account the ecology of viewing in the household where Turkish people in extended families view TV commercials.

Originality/value

Although the issue of adolescents and advertising is widely explored in the USA, there has been limited investigation on adolescents' receptivity to advertising in other cultures. Although it is likely that some aspects of adolescent consumer behavior are universal across cultures, studies such as that documented in this paper provide opportunities to investigate what is happening in different settings.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Akshaya Vijayalakshmi, Russell Laczniak and Deanne Brocato

This study aims to uncover in-depth examples of how emergent media affects parents’ views and socialization efforts. The study examines these views and efforts in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to uncover in-depth examples of how emergent media affects parents’ views and socialization efforts. The study examines these views and efforts in the context of violent commercials.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data for this paper using two studies. In Study 1, they collected data from the internet. Comments related to “violent ads” or “violent commercials” were collated and analyzed. For Study 2, they conducted in-depth interviews with mothers on their views on parental mediation and impact of media on their children.

Findings

The internet data helped develop a parental definition of violent ads and identify that parents lie on a continuum regarding their concerns about violent commercials. Further in-depth questioning of parents on the above finding led to the identification of four clusters of parents. “Media managers” attempt to control and restrict their child’s media environment while educating their child about the effects of violent commercials. “Enablers” spend abundant time co-viewing primetime TV while engaging their child in conversations on violence, but not on violent ads. To maintain harmony in the household, “Harmonizers” merely restrict viewing of violent commercials without educating their child about its effects. Finally, “Agent evaluators” are likely to co-view violent commercials, without discussing them with their child.

Research limitations/implications

First, several of the parental segments (media managers, enablers and harmonizers) tend to note some concerns with violence in advertising. Importantly, this concern for violence appears to be limited to gore and use of physical weapon. Second, while parents do not have homogenous views on violent ads, those who are concerned also have differing roots of concern. This influences their mediation efforts. Third, socialization is bi-directional at times.

Practical implications

Many parents do not approve are the use of physical violence, use of weapons and depiction of blood/gore even in ads for movies or videogames. Advertisers might be wise to avoid such content in ads directed to children. Second, if media and marketing managers could plan to sponsor TV shows (vs placing violent ads) that offer ad-free program time, parents might respond positively. Third, as socialization is bi-directional, advertisers could consider using ad scenarios where parents and children engage with the pros and cons of a certain product or content, thus enabling parent-child conversations to make an informed decision.

Social implications

Many parents notice violence in ads; policymakers could consider developing ratings for ads that consider the amount and type of violence while rating an ad. Second, a focus on increasing parental awareness on the harms of constantly exposing children to violent commercials might change the views of some parents who currently believe that a few or no violent commercials are being aired during children’s programs. Finally, parents envisage a greater role for media in their lives, and policymakers will have to suggest ways to effectively integrate media content in one’s lives rather than just suggest bans or restrictions.

Originality/value

The contributions of this paper include viewers’ (vs researchers’) definition of violent commercials, showcasing that parents are likely to manage media using new media options such as Netflix, and some parents are likely to co-create rules with their children.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Philip J. Kitchen and David A. Yorke

Explores UK audience reception data provided by the Broadcasting Audience Research Board (BARB) and questions it with regard to new technology. Discusses technological…

Abstract

Explores UK audience reception data provided by the Broadcasting Audience Research Board (BARB) and questions it with regard to new technology. Discusses technological innovations with reference to changing from passive to interactive television viewing, and notes developments to remote control television, teletext, video recorders, computers, cable television and micro‐TVs. Puts forward the development of new technology and spotlights its possible growth areas but does warn that, at present, new technology is still at the innovation stage. States also that video recorders and remote control equipped televisions are presently in an early stage of development and use. Assesses types of households and selects four for questionnaire use. Gives tabular typology for types and illustrates these in depth. Concludes that technology is affecting audience receptivity to commercial breaks on television, and that media planners and commercial advertisers must regard current audience data as inconclusive.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

J.P. Shim, Sungmin Park and Julie M. Shim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of current mobile TV phone usage and discuss the issues for strategic implications for the communications and mobile TV industry.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of current mobile TV phone usage and discuss the issues for strategic implications for the communications and mobile TV industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Real tracking data, collected from server's logs during 2006 and 2007 from South Korean satellite DMB providers, were analyzed according to users' age group, peak viewing time of programs, location usage and program duration. Further analysis with the previous literature led to inferences about strategic implications.

Findings

The analysis revealed the current mobile TV usage patterns: widespread user age group, peak viewing time, high indoor usage and longer viewing time. These results shaped strategic implications, furthering and enhancing a personalized media experience.

Research limitations/implications

The data set, collected from the subscription‐based satellite DMB usage in South Korea, is well recognized as being a technological frontier. Further cultural comparison research work on mobile TV usage is required to validate the strategic implications for a wider cross cultural adoption.

Practical implications

This research benefits the strategic planning of the mobile communications and entertainment content industries in decision‐making regarding the improvement of hands‐on experience for mobile TV users.

Originality/value

The findings, based on the mobile TV real tracking data, collected in South Korea for over two years contrast to that of other countries, which only begin to experience the roll‐out of a full commercial service. Consequently, the data presented here highlights an important role in understanding and shaping of the mobile TV phone market for other parts of the world.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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