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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Jackie Coyle‐Shapiro

A longitudinal research design was used to investigate the effectsof a TQM intervention on teamwork in a manufacturing setting. Indicatesthat TQM intervention did not have…

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Abstract

A longitudinal research design was used to investigate the effects of a TQM intervention on teamwork in a manufacturing setting. Indicates that TQM intervention did not have a significant direct effect on teamwork. However, one aspect of the intervention, supervisory reinforcement, had a significant indirect effect on teamwork through its impact on changes in trust in colleagues. Overall, employee assess‐ment of the intervention was found to be a better predictor of teamwork than participation in the intervention per se.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jason Rodriquez

This article examines how a profit-centered restructuring of labor relations in an academic medical center undermined team-based care practices in its intensive care unit…

Abstract

This article examines how a profit-centered restructuring of labor relations in an academic medical center undermined team-based care practices in its intensive care unit. The Institute of Medicine has promoted team-based care to improve patient outcomes, and the staff in the intensive care unit researched for this paper had established a set of practices they defined as teamwork. After hospital executives rolled out a public relations campaign to promote its culture of teamwork, they restructured its workforce to enhance numerical and functional flexibility in three key ways: implementing a “service line” managerial structure; cutting a range of staff positions while combining others; and doubling the capacity of its profitable and highly regarded intensive care unit. Hospital executives said the restructuring was necessitated by changes to payment models brought forth by the Affordable Care Act. Based on 300 hours of participant-observation and 35 interviews with hospital staff, findings show that the restructuring lowered staff resources and intensified work, which limited their ability to practice care they defined as teamwork and undermined the unit’s collective identity as a team. Findings also show how staff members used teamwork as a sensitizing concept to make sense of what they did at work. The meanings attached to teamwork were anchored to positions in the hospitals’ organizational hierarchy. This paper advances our understanding of he flexible work arrangements in the health care industry and their effects on workers.

Details

Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management and the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-459-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Jan de Leede and Joyce Nijland

New Ways of Working practices like activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Due to these NWW practices, employees choose their…

Abstract

New Ways of Working practices like activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Due to these NWW practices, employees choose their own preferred times and places to work – albeit to a certain extent and within certain boundaries. This might have an impact on the possibilities for teamwork. Therefore, we suppose that teamwork and teamwork behaviors might moderate the relationship between NWW and outcomes. Does teamwork behavior have an influence on the relation of NWW and productivity or organizational commitment? And how, is it a positive or a negative influence on these relations? This chapter reports the results of an explorative study on the relationship between NWW practices, teamwork behavior, productivity, and organizational commitment. Quantitative data from the questionnaire will illustrate the main issues: the complex linkages between the four components of NWW, the outcome variables, and the effect of different components of teamwork behavior. This chapter describes the issue of teamwork and provides new data on the actual use and effectiveness of the different components of teamwork behaviors.

Details

New Ways of Working Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-303-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Sakthi Mahenthiran, Robert Mackoy and Jane L. Y. Terpstra-Tong

This study examines how budgetary support (BS), teamwork, and organizational commitment to employees (OCE) affect firm performance across two countries, Malaysia and the…

Abstract

This study examines how budgetary support (BS), teamwork, and organizational commitment to employees (OCE) affect firm performance across two countries, Malaysia and the United States. By surveying senior managers of 165 small and medium enterprises, this study finds that teamwork and BS each has a direct effect on OCE and firm performance. Further, results indicate that OCE mediates the relationship between BS, teamwork, and firm performance. In Malaysia, but not in the United States, we find that teamwork affects performance directly. In the United States, but not in Malaysia, we find that BS affects performance, and there is an interaction effect between BS and management influence. We attribute the effects to the different national cultures and social-exchange relations and highlight the contributions to the budgeting research, organizational commitment literature, and to practice.

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2008

Luis Ortiz and Francisco Llorente-Galera

The debate concerning the convergence or divergence of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations has grown in parallel with the importance of multinational…

Abstract

The debate concerning the convergence or divergence of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations has grown in parallel with the importance of multinational companies (MNCs) in OECD countries. The “country-of-origin effect” and “host-country effect” are two obvious poles of this debate (Ferner & Quintanilla, 1998). The country-of-origin effect claims the ability of MNCs to shape industrial relations and HRM practices in their subsidiaries abroad, frequently in accordance with industrial relations practices and institutions in their country of origin. Conversely, the host-country effect stresses the resilience of industrial relations institutions at both the national (Whitley, 1999; Hall & Soskice, 2001; Katz & Darbishire, 2000) and the regional or local levels (Belanger, Berggren, Björkman, & Köhler, 1999; Ortiz, 2002). Yet, the possibility that each one of these effects could prevail under different circumstances has hardly been considered. Moreover, the roles of politics and structure within the organization (Edwards, Almond, Clark, Colling, & Ferner, 2005), as well as the role of local culture, have often been ignored.

Details

The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1401-0

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Shalini Ramdeo, Paul Balwant and Simon Harold Fraser

As group work is becoming more common in the classroom, teamwork as an andragogical tool continues to be problematic for students in management programs. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

As group work is becoming more common in the classroom, teamwork as an andragogical tool continues to be problematic for students in management programs. The purpose of this paper is to determine how university students perceive teamwork and to identify teamwork problems along with potential solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulation mixed-methods approach was used. In study 1, qualitative data were gathered from a focus group comprising nine students. In study 2, quantitative data were gathered from an online survey completed by 127 students.

Findings

The data were analyzed using content analysis and ordinary least squares regression. The results indicated that free-rider experiences and peer evaluation are two key areas in determining dissatisfaction with teamwork. Teamwork challenges may be addressed via knowledgeable team leaders who balance task and relationship styles, equitable workloads, smaller team sizes, anonymous peer evaluations and the effective use of technology.

Practical implications

The findings are valuable to educators at tertiary-level institutions who utilize teamwork as an andragogical tool.

Originality/value

This study was designed to deepen understanding of university students' dissatisfaction with teamwork in Trinidad and Tobago and provide andragogical improvements that can be implemented to enhance the students' teamwork experience.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Anjali Dutta and Santosh Rangnekar

Collaboration and preference for teamwork play a fundamental role in strengthening practical completion of team tasks. An organizational culture should facilitate learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration and preference for teamwork play a fundamental role in strengthening practical completion of team tasks. An organizational culture should facilitate learning systems where knowledge creation occurs through socialization. The purpose of this study is to develop a moderated mediation model, investigating the conditional indirect effect of co-worker support on the relationship between preference for teamwork and communities of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey was conducted via Google Forms to collect data from 210 employees working in the private and public sector in India. Hayes PROCESS macro models were used for analyzing the mediation of personal interaction and moderation of co-worker support.

Findings

This study showed evidence regarding the mediating role of personal interaction on the relationship between preference for teamwork and communities of practice. Co-worker support moderated the relationship between personal interaction and communities of practice. It also moderated the conditional indirect effect.

Practical implications

The results approve the substantial role of preference for teamwork in influencing personal interaction and communities of practice. The mediating role of personal interaction on preference for teamwork and communities of practice can lead to creation and sustenance of communities of practice. Furthermore, the moderating role of co-worker support as a conditional indirect effect shows that social support and exchange can lead to social learning.

Originality/value

Theoretical explanations and analytical approaches provide insights into the relationship between the preference for teamwork and communities of practice through a conditional indirect effect, a one of its kind of a study.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Pilar Pazos, María Carmen Pérez-López and María José González-López

Although the importance of teamwork competencies and effective conflict management in entrepreneurship education is recognised, we have limited knowledge of how these…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although the importance of teamwork competencies and effective conflict management in entrepreneurship education is recognised, we have limited knowledge of how these factors interact to influence performance in entrepreneurial teams. This research explores teamwork competencies as a predictor of entrepreneurial team performance and the moderating effect of emerging cognitive and interpersonal team conflict as levers in entrepreneurship learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey method was used to collect data from 49 teams (156 individuals) of undergraduate students in an experiential new venture creation course. A predictive model of entrepreneurial team performance through hierarchical regression analyses and moderated-moderation analyses was tested.

Findings

Results reveal that teamwork competencies have a significant and direct influence on entrepreneurial team performance and that intragroup conflict strengthens that relationship when high levels of cognitive conflict and low levels of interpersonal conflict emerge.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the design of entrepreneurial training programs, which will benefit from interventions aimed at teamwork competency development that incorporate strategies promoting constructive cognitive conflict while preventing the emergence of interpersonal conflict.

Originality/value

This study is a step forward in entrepreneurship education research from the perspective of social and interpersonal processes by identifying the patterns of intra-team conflict that lead to more effective entrepreneurial teams and more productive use of teamwork competencies in a learning-by-doing entrepreneurial context.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 64 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Ivor J. Parry, David Tranfield, Stuart Smith, Morris Foster and Sarah Wilson

Reports on research resulting from a three year EPSRC funded project into teamworking in manufacturing companies. Investigates archetypal forms of teamworking rather than…

2760

Abstract

Reports on research resulting from a three year EPSRC funded project into teamworking in manufacturing companies. Investigates archetypal forms of teamworking rather than focusing upon narrow or discrete sets of issues. Explores the dynamic capabilities of teamworking, firstly by considering changes in the manufacturing environment with its legacy of ‘old’ organisational forms and functions to contemporary environments where quality, flexibility and continuous improvement are key features, and secondly by discussing a detailed case history of one of the project’s collaborating companies. Identifies archetypal approaches to teamworking and explores benefits of a strategic organisational perspective. Argues that much of the teamworking literature fails to adopt either an organisational or strategic perspective, and hence is unable to acknowledge the complexity of such interventions. Reviews the implications of this more organisational approach for research design and investigation by means of a detailed case study, and explores the development of a strategic methodology for the effective introduction and development of teamworking into manufacturing companies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2012

Raffaella Valsecchi, Sarah Wise, Frank Mueller and Chris Smith

This paper aims to explore the introduction of teamwork in two health call centres, NHS Direct and NHS24, and intervenes in the emergent debate over teamwork in call…

2392

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the introduction of teamwork in two health call centres, NHS Direct and NHS24, and intervenes in the emergent debate over teamwork in call centres. Although within the call centre work environment there is no obvious functional rationale for teamwork, teams can be “accounted for” with reference to other purposes, including performance management, normative control, governmentality and institutional isomorphism/management fads. This research provides additional explanations for the use of teamwork in such an adverse work environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on qualitative data (interviews and non‐participant observations) from NHS Direct and NHS24, the English and Scottish tele‐nursing organisations in the UK.

Findings

In the two tele‐nursing case studies analysed, teamwork was introduced as an expression of managers' aspirations to emulate private sector practices and to reinforce new public management ideals. However, informal teamwork, which cut across organisationally prescribed forms, provided both emotional support and spontaneous knowledge sharing among nurses.

Originality/value

This is an innovative study because teamwork has not been thoroughly explored in a health call centre environment.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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