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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Tom Batley

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ)commissioned a management training needs analysis of the 6,000 membersin 1988. The objectives were to…

Abstract

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ) commissioned a management training needs analysis of the 6,000 members in 1988. The objectives were to determine the specific management subjects required for further education and training of experienced graduate engineers and their preferred methods of learning. The survey commenced with pilot study interviews with professional engineers leading to a questionnaire sent to a representative sample of IPENZ members throughout New Zealand. The results showed strong agreement about the managerial content of most professional engineering work. They also indicated a large majority who recognised the need for further education in business management subjects. The analysis indicated the most preferred management subjects from a comprehensive list ranked by professional engineers: personal and interpersonal management skills; general management and decision making; individual, group and organisational behaviour; finance and accounting; personnel management; project management. The least required management subjects chosen from the list were quantitative methods and information systems. These management subject preferences are not satisfied by the majority of short management training courses presently offered to professional engineers.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1988

T.W. Batley and T.P. Mangos

The main objective of a 1986 survey of production and operations managers throughout New Zealand industry was to determine the extent of computer use. The survey explored…

Abstract

The main objective of a 1986 survey of production and operations managers throughout New Zealand industry was to determine the extent of computer use. The survey explored the use of microcomputers, mini computers and mainframes by production managers. Job title and responsibilities of the manager responsible for the majority of production management functions were investigated. It appeared that information and decision making in production management was fragmented in most organisations. The survey examined the main uses of computer information and control systems in production planning and inventory control, the perceived benefits and problems. The main computer brands in use and types of software were also analysed. Comparisons were made with surveys of British companies and some work in the USA.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

T.W. Batley

Present and potential uses of microcomputers in teaching operationsand production management are examined. Microcomputers are generallyavailable to most students and…

Abstract

Present and potential uses of microcomputers in teaching operations and production management are examined. Microcomputers are generally available to most students and managers. Difficulties lie in developing the most effective learning methods using microcomputers instead of expecting students to self‐learn entirely by working their way through a program manual in front of a screen. Potential uses of microcomputer‐based simulations and the possible learning benefits are explored. Uses of an aggregate planning case study are given as an example, involving manual calculations, group discussion and a microcomputer spreadsheet. The example shows how small groups can learn more effectively about the power and speed of microcomputers by using them in a real situation. The simulation emphasises the useful role of micro‐computers as an integral part of operations planning systems and decision‐making processes.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

T.W. Batley

There has been an increasing drive to improve total quality management of manufactured products internationally in recent years. This has resulted in many improvements in…

Abstract

There has been an increasing drive to improve total quality management of manufactured products internationally in recent years. This has resulted in many improvements in the quality and management of quality in New Zealand firms. Research was carried out in New Zealand to compare the opinions of manufacturing company managers about product quality with general public opinions. Probes perceptions of recent changes in product quality and compares the quality of New Zealand made goods with the quality of those made overseas. Most managers and consumers agreed that the quality of New Zealand made goods is now better than most overseas made goods. Shows a great improvement in the public perception of New Zealand made goods in recent years. Managers are still much stronger than consumers in their belief in local made high quality, which may have resulted in some complacency regarding management of product quality.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Tom W. Batley

A survey was carried out recently in New Zealand manufacturingfirms to identify typical quality management policies and operatingpractices and to determine changes in…

Abstract

A survey was carried out recently in New Zealand manufacturing firms to identify typical quality management policies and operating practices and to determine changes in recent years. Product design quality and quality control procedures were investigated, together with testing and quality control of finished products and the procedures for dealing with customer complaints. Training in quality assurance methods and overall costs of quality management, and attitudes towards external verification of quality management procedures were also examined. Managers have recognized the importance of high quality standards for ensuring company survival in competitive markets. More has been spent recently on improving quality policies and quality management training, but serious gaps were identified between quality policies and operating practices.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Tom Batley

The need for management training for experienced professional engineers in New Zealand has been well recognised for a long time. Research with professional engineers in…

Abstract

The need for management training for experienced professional engineers in New Zealand has been well recognised for a long time. Research with professional engineers in New Zealand, including a training needs analysis, has indicated a strong need and high potential benefits from management training, particularly in personal and interpersonal management skills. A list of 25 most appropriate personal and interpersonal skills was developed. A three‐day management training workshop was developed as a result of the research for engineers working in small groups. A book on management skills for professionals was written to reinforce the teaching. The course has since been run several times per year at the University of Canterbury and has attracted large numbers of engineers. Feedback from the course participants has been very positive, saying that it provides much needed opportunities for self‐development and learning.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Nicolaos E. Synodinos

This article reviews research findings related to the “art” of constructing survey questionnaires. It discusses some of the important issues that should be considered in…

Abstract

This article reviews research findings related to the “art” of constructing survey questionnaires. It discusses some of the important issues that should be considered in gathering quality data via questionnaires, provides general suggestions for their construction, includes a comprehensive list of important reference sources, and examines some of the survey‐based studies published in Integrated Manufacturing Systems. Constructing a good questionnaire requires a thorough grasp of the intricacies of the topical area and detailed knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the different survey administration modes. In addition, questionnaire construction entails close attention to details about the wording of questions, their instructions, their response choices, and their sequence. Most importantly, the research instrument should be refined based on guidance from repeated pretests. Well‐constructed questionnaires can ensure the consistent meaning of the questions across respondents and can contribute to data quality by decreasing both item and unit nonresponse.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

S.F. Lee, Paul Roberts, W.S. Lau and Ruth Leung

Outlines the methodologies and bases used in the design of questionnaire for the investigation of quality management philosophies and strategies employed in Hong Kong…

Abstract

Outlines the methodologies and bases used in the design of questionnaire for the investigation of quality management philosophies and strategies employed in Hong Kong organizations. The design of the questionnaire of the survey was based on people’s thinking and past experiences on quality management, concept and philosophy of some quality standards and Deming’s 14 points on Total Quality Management (TQM). The amalgamation of these useful thoughts, concepts and philosophies would help to develop their quality management and business management strategies that lead to business excellence performance. The survey itself would then further assess the state of development of quality management aspects and identify the future quality management strategies that suit the needs of industries of Hong Kong.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

THE VALUE OF ABSTRACTS AND THEIR USE ‐ MCB is not a company to rest on its laurels. In the vernacular of modern‐day management literature, the company can rightly claim to…

Abstract

THE VALUE OF ABSTRACTS AND THEIR USE ‐ MCB is not a company to rest on its laurels. In the vernacular of modern‐day management literature, the company can rightly claim to be a learning organization; one that seeks to regenerate and develop itself in accordance with current trends, most notably customer and market requirements.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Sameer Prasad and Jasmine Tata

Quality management practices have recently flourished across the globe. In this research we review and integrate the literature by identifying and organizing significant…

Abstract

Quality management practices have recently flourished across the globe. In this research we review and integrate the literature by identifying and organizing significant research findings, and develop a conceptual model of the relationships between international environmental conditions (e.g. socio‐cultural, political‐legal, economic, and educational factors) and dimensions of quality management (e.g. strategic quality planning, customer focus and satisfaction, human resource development and management, information and analysis, management of process quality, and quality and operational results). The model developed here helps us move beyond examining the differences in quality practices across countries to an understanding of why such differences occur, and helps practitioners gain a better perspective on how quality management techniques can be adopted in different regions around the world.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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