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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

T.P. Coultate, S. Sumar and F.G. Davies

Provides an overview of the analytical methods used to quantifymicronutrients (metals, non‐metals and vitamins) present in food.Considers the principles of the methods of analysis…

831

Abstract

Provides an overview of the analytical methods used to quantify micronutrients (metals, non‐metals and vitamins) present in food. Considers the principles of the methods of analysis employed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 95 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

S. Sumar, T.P. Coultate and J. Davies

Provides an overview of the analytical methods used to quantify themacronutrients (protein, water, lipids and carbohydrates) present infood. Considers principles of the methods of…

1321

Abstract

Provides an overview of the analytical methods used to quantify the macronutrients (protein, water, lipids and carbohydrates) present in food. Considers principles of the methods of analysis employed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Maximiliano Nicolás Saraco and James Blaxland

The aim of this study was to compare the organoleptic attributes and meltability of selected, commercial dairy-free imitation cheeses (DFICs) with those of their dairy…

1548

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to compare the organoleptic attributes and meltability of selected, commercial dairy-free imitation cheeses (DFICs) with those of their dairy counterparts to thus determine whether commercial DFIC needs to be further developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Market research was conducted to determine the availability of DFICs in the United Kingdom (UK) and thus select the varieties to assess. Mild cheddar was chosen for its popularity wide availability in the United Kingdom and Italian-style hard cheese for its complex organoleptic profile. The organoleptic attributes and melting properties of the chosen DFIC products were assessed by using descriptive sensory evaluation and their meltability was assessed using the Arnott test, respectively.

Findings

109 different DFICs were found; most of them (74%) presented coconut oil as their primary ingredient. None of the assessed DFICs assessed could mimic the organoleptic attributes of their dairy counterparts accurately; however, one of the non-dairy mild cheddar samples was regarded as potentially acceptable by the assessors of the sensory evaluation assessors. Nonetheless, the meltability of this sample was significantly lower than that of mild cheddar cheese.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that, to obtain products that can mimic the organoleptic attributes and meltability of cheese more accurately, further development is required for the DFIC varieties assessed.

Originality/value

No academic publications have explored and investigated commercial DFICs with similar ingredients to those found in commercial DFICs; the commercial importance of these products may augment in the short term owing to the reported growth in the number of vegan individuals in the UK and in Europe.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Christopher Strugnell

Outlines some of the reasons behind the development of vegetableoil cheese and critically questions the whole basis and need for suchcheese‐type or substitute products. Evaluates…

Abstract

Outlines some of the reasons behind the development of vegetable oil cheese and critically questions the whole basis and need for such cheese‐type or substitute products. Evaluates two of these new products and compares them with mild and low‐fat Cheddar cheese by using a semi‐trained sensory panel. Finds no significant differences between the appearance of the cheeses but finds differences for texture and flavour. Finds the vegetable oil cheeses to have a flavour similar to mild Cheddar, while the product made with sunflower oil has a soft and crumbly texture compared with that of cheese made from rapeseed oil.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Chris Strugnell

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines thefunctions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fatsubstitutes. Summarizes the implications for…

Abstract

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines the functions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fat substitutes. Summarizes the implications for consumers and processors of their use.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Nomusa R. Dlamini and Shadreck Dube

The aim of the study is to determine the microbial, physico‐chemical and nutritional changes that take place during the four‐day traditional preparation of wine from the fruits of…

1593

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to determine the microbial, physico‐chemical and nutritional changes that take place during the four‐day traditional preparation of wine from the fruits of Marula (Sclerocarya birrea subspecies Caffra) tree in Zimbabwe. It must be noted that Marula is documented as a drought‐resistant plant.

Design/methodology/approach

The fruits used in the study were taken from four trees growing in different locations. The fermenting microbial populations were isolated using potato dextrose, tomato juice and nutrient agars, and then identified to genus level using simple biochemical tests. The physico‐chemical changes determined were pH, titratable acidity, sugar and alcohol content. The alcohol content was determined using the Anton Paar beer analyzer, while nutritional changes, evaluated as changes in ascorbic acid (vitamin C) levels, were determined using the 2, 6 dichlorophenolindophenol titrimetric method.

Findings

During fermentation there was a gradual decrease in the bacterial population, and an increase in yeast counts. The pH and sugar contents decreased, while the average alcohol content increased to an average 2 per cent. The fermented Marula juice retained 72 per cent of the initial ascorbic acid content (a decrease from 133 to 96 mg/100 g) compared with orange juice subjected to similar conditions, which retained 40 per cent ascorbic acid levels (decrease from 60 to 24 mg/100 g).

Originality/value

The low pH of Marula wine could contribute to the microbiological safety of the product and relative stability of ascorbic acid. Marula wine produced after four days of fermentation is still an importance source of ascorbic acid.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Svetlana Rodgers

The purpose of this paper is to identify technological challenges and innovative solutions in each of the food production philosophies in the food service sector, namely…

9564

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify technological challenges and innovative solutions in each of the food production philosophies in the food service sector, namely: industrial cuisine, fast food and fresh food.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews industry reports on cooking equipment and preparation techniques. Conceptual links are made with possible future developments as well as operational/strategic advantages they represent.

Findings

Innovation in food preparation commands multi‐disciplinary approaches stemming from engineering and food science. Industrial cuisine would benefit from automation, units with intensive heating, robust food product design and shelf‐life extension; fast food from reduced oil absorption by food, better cooking oils, automation and short frying time; and fresh food from rapid cooking, visually appealing serving units and analytical instrumentation for testing raw produce. Future innovations may originate in the field of robotics, food engineering and laboratory equipment design including miniaturisation and portability of units. Sophistication in product development can be achieved through application of the principles of molecular gastronomy in combination with computer modelling.

Practical implications

Managers can conceptualise their operations in terms of the philosophies presented in the paper. Technological innovation is critical to sustain competitiveness (cost leadership and differentiation). The list of underpinning disciplines in food production can be used by educators wishing to enhance their programs with fundamentals supporting innovation.

Originality/value

Food preparation philosophies are presented in the light of impacts on food sensory and microbiological quality, nutritional value and operational efficiencies. The possibilities for future innovation stemming from developments in other technologically advanced fields are identified.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional quality and the core factors used when evaluating the nutritional quality of menus are discussed. The empirical data were collected in 2008 by theme interviewing nine municipal food service employees. The data were analysed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that both positive and contributing factors emerged as follows: productisation of menu; using a plate model; length of a control period concerning the nutritional quality of the menu; checking the nutrition content when making changes in menus, dishes and food items; dealing with the results of the evaluation in the meetings; including the results in the service agreements; employers' positive attitude displayed towards software suppliers' training; including nutritional quality as a part of service quality; and implementing nutritional quality according to the job descriptions.

Practical implications

A variety of courses should be offered for the students concerning the guidance of food production by using software in professional kitchens; integrating working life into the curriculum; continuous training of the food service personnel; and cooperation with the professional kitchen's software suppliers. Moreover, further implications could involve, for example, developing and diffusing the national model for the nutritional quality follow‐up; and taking the Sinfos‐product information data bank into use.

Originality/value

Active updating of the software and training of the employees are needed in order to ensure the nutritional quality of menus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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