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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

O.O. Ugwu and T.C. Haupt

This paper reports on research that investigated perceptions and prioritization of key performance indicators (KPI) for infrastructure sustainability, from a cross section…

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1763

Abstract

This paper reports on research that investigated perceptions and prioritization of key performance indicators (KPI) for infrastructure sustainability, from a cross section of construction industry stakeholders in Hong Kong and Republic of South Africa. The results show that although there is general agreement on the indicators, there are noticeable differences in stakeholder ranking, which measures their prioritisation of the various indicators. These differences are closely linked to the level of development of the respective country and hence macro‐level priorities in formulating their sustainable development agenda. The most significant agreements are on indicators related to health and safety, while there are significant disagreements on some indicators related to environment, economy and project management and administration. The study provides empirical evidence of such underlying differences. The paper discusses the implications and challenges in addressing sustainability and sustainable development in developed and developing countries. The paper discusses the findings from the two‐country comparative studies and provides validated indicators for infrastructure sustainability. Recommendations are given on the application of these indicators for decision‐support and integrated sustainability appraisal in infrastructure project (SUSAIP).

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Nicholas Chileshe and Theo C. Haupt

The purpose of this paper is to model the critical success factors of construction project management (CPM). Despite the emergence of construction project management as an…

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2580

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to model the critical success factors of construction project management (CPM). Despite the emergence of construction project management as an academic discipline, existing instrument found in literature were for measuring the importance of Construction Managers and Project Managers skills or attributes yet the combined dual role of Construction Project Management as a discipline or profession remains under researched. After collecting 58 empirical observations from within the South African construction related organisations, the paper tests the theoretical relationships by using the structural equation modelling (SEM) technique. The research identifies six factors which are critical for the effectiveness of CPM. The study also highlights the benefits of modelling the factors using tradition methods such as bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis techniques to extract factors of CPM. The results indicate that correlation between the “hard” and “soft” skills is necessary for the effective implementation of Construction Project Management. The proposed theoretical model not only has the potential to enhance competitive success but can act as a valuable diagnostic tool in addressing the effectiveness of construction project management.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Theo C. Haupt and John Smallwood

The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) (2001) urges African leaders to take responsibility for revitalizing and extending the provision of education…

Abstract

The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) (2001) urges African leaders to take responsibility for revitalizing and extending the provision of education, technical training and health services with high priority given to tackling HIV/AIDS, TB and other communicable diseases. The International Labor Organization (ILO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) both agree that occupational health and safety in Africa needs strengthening. In support of this realization are the need to maintain and promote workers' health and working capacity. The fight against HIV/AIDS in the workplace is a continental priority. In the absence of any other definitive or similar study, this study aims to establish a valid baseline assessment of the levels of knowledge, types of attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of older construction workers in South Africa regarding HIV infection and AIDS. This paper reports only on findings concerning the level of knowledge and awareness of HIV/AIDS among older construction workers as determined during the first phase of an exploratory study commenced in August 2002. Older construction workers generally had acceptable levels of correct knowledge, perceptions and attitudes on most issues relative to the disease. However, their employers had not played a major contributory role. The study highlighted several areas where older workers either had incorrect and deficient knowledge and attitudes or demonstrated high levels of uncertainty.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

J. English, T.C. Haupt and J.J. Smallwood

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and…

Abstract

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and ergonomic hazards, manual handling included. Internationally, women constitute a minor percentage of the construction workforce. Furthermore, perceptions exist that women are not suited to construction, that construction work is too physical for women, and that the image of the industry discourages participation by women. Whether or not perceptions are just, they are important as people act on them. A study was initiated to determine perceptions relative to: participation of women in general; their role; their capacity; their impact; their potential contribution; barriers to their participation; and general and gender specific issues. The paper reports on studies conducted in South Africa and Tanzania, the salient findings being: women have a role in construction; increased participation by women will contribute to improving the image of construction; women have requirements related to their gender and roles; some construction materials constitute a manual materials handling problem to women, and current welfare facilities for women (such as medical support or child care) are inadequate. The paper concludes that endeavours are necessary to change attitudes, promote participation by women, accommodate women, and improve conditions, particularly H&S.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Seirgei Miller, Theo C. Haupt and Nicholas Chileshe

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It…

Abstract

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It incorporates productive work into the curriculum as a regular and integral element of a higher education course. The present model involves three cooperative partners namely, the university, student and employer. It should, therefore, be evident that cooperative education has two main components, namely an academic component and an experiential learning component, both of which are integral to its success. To enable students to understand the relationship between academic subjects and the world of work, cooperative education involves restructuring the educational experience. For some time, industry employer representatives have suggested that education and training offered at Universities of Technology do not always address the needs of industry. They argue that graduates lack the necessary theoretical skills, training and managerial understanding to ensure immediate meaningful employment. These inadequacies contribute to unemployment and the lack of advancement opportunity within their chosen careers. In addition, there is a need to examine the perceptions of students regarding course content before they go into industry. This was the motivation for this research. The aims of the research project are twofold. Firstly, to examine the course content offered within the civil engineering diploma programme, and secondly to measure the levels of subject satisfaction. Using an exploratory approach through a survey of 123 students, this study explores the course content and satisfaction levels based on study areas in the first year program. The results indicate that students generally perceive the subject Communication Skills to be least satisfying whereas Mathematics is considered to be the most satisfying subject. This paper concludes by presenting the subject satisfaction index tool which contributes to the range of intervention strategies as envisaged by the CIDB. This further contributes towards the improvement of the overall quality of University of Technology civil engineering academic programs and also the subsequent productive employability of its graduates.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Theo C. Haupt and Kersey Pillay

The construction industry contributes significantly to national economic growth and offers substantial opportunities for job creation; however, the industry has…

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1717

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry contributes significantly to national economic growth and offers substantial opportunities for job creation; however, the industry has continually been plagued by workplace accidents. Moreover, employers may not realize the economic magnitude of workplace injury and ill health arising from construction activities. These accidents represent a considerable economic and social burden to employers, employees and to the society as a whole. Despite governments and organisations worldwide maintaining an ongoing commitment towards establishing a working environment free of injury and disease, a great deal of construction accidents continues to frequent our society. The purpose of this study is to conduct an analysis of a sample of 100 construction accident reports to establish, as far as practically reasonable, the total costs of limited types of construction accidents. Costs attributable to each of these accidents were classified either as direct or indirect costs. Through an exhaustive and time-consuming investigation of all available records from various sources and/or kept in various departments, the individual costs were correlated to the various direct and indirect categories.

Design/methodology/approach

This particular study is a combination of explanatory and collective case study approaches, whereby causal effects are determined or a course of events is examined from multiple cases. The preferred form of data collection is left to the researcher to decide (Yin, 2003). When a researcher is considering “how” or “why” questions, a contemporary set of events using primary and secondary documents, over which the researcher has little or no control, the case study approach is feasible (Yin, 2009).

Findings

The costs of construction accidents for the same sample of 100 construction analysed in this study has been estimated at a staggering R32,981,200. Of this total, R10,087,350 has been attributed to direct costs and R22,893,850 has been attributed to indirect costs. The costs of construction accidents are based on four cost components: sick pay, administrative costs, recruitment costs and compensation and insurance costs. It should be noted that the estimates of the costs to employers presented in this study are reflective of the activities and incidents of the reviewed organisation and may not necessarily represent another organisation. The costs of construction accidents values presented in this study reveal that construction accidents present a substantial cost to employers and to the society at large, inclusive of both the direct and indirect costs. It is therefore in the best interest of the employer to identify progressive and advanced approaches to more effectively manage construction health and safety, consequently society at large will benefit tremendously.

Originality/value

Given the high rate of construction accidents experienced, employers are not entirely mindful of the actual costs of construction accidents, especially when considering the hidden or indirect costs of accidents. Various safety research efforts have attempted to quantify the true costs of worker injuries; however, localised systematic information on cost of construction accidents at work is not readily available from administrative statistical data sources; therefore, this study was carried out to estimate the costs, like lost workdays or lost income, are clearly visible and can readily be expressed in monetary value; for a large part,0 however, economic consequences of accidents are somewhat hidden.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

J.J. Smallwood and T.C. Haupt

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact on architects of recently introduced Construction Regulations in South Africa.

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1093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact on architects of recently introduced Construction Regulations in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the passing of the first anniversary of the promulgation of the Construction Regulations, a survey was conducted to determine the perceptions of member practices of the South African Institute of Architects.

Findings

Findings include: the traditional project parameters in the form of cost, quality, and time are still perceived to be substantially more important than health and safety (H&S); the manifestations of the impact of the Construction Regulations are wide spread – increased H&S awareness predominates among the manifestations, followed by increased consideration for H&S by most stakeholders, and H&S predominates in terms of the extent to which the Construction Regulations will impact on various project parameters.

Originality/value

The paper offers a valid argument for the inclusion of construction H&S to feature more prominently in architectural education and training programmes.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Ayotunde Babalola, Shamsudeen Musa, Mariam Temisola Akinlolu and Theo C. Haupt

This paper aims to provide a bibliometric analysis of advances in building information modeling (BIM) research globally. It provides a recent state-of-the-art assessment…

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327

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a bibliometric analysis of advances in building information modeling (BIM) research globally. It provides a recent state-of-the-art assessment on trends as it relates to the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. Being a vastly emerging research area, there is a need for the appraisal of research trends.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive bibliometric analysis was conducted using a dual step filtering system on an initial volume of 2347 documents in the first stage between 2010 and 2020, and of 311 publications in the final stage of the analyses which emphasized more on 2015–2020 from the WoS database. Frequency analyses on the sources, affiliations, authors and country/ region of publication were assessed in the first stage of the analyses. Co-authorship and evidence of author collaboration were also examined. The second stage included a co-occurrence keyword network analysis. Further, text mining/mapping of the abstract of the documents was performed.

Findings

Emerging trends in the field of BIM research include but are not limited to historical building information modeling (h-BIM) applications, the use of blockchain technology, digital twin, Construction Operations Building information exchange (COBiE), Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), dynamo-bim, energy plus software and BIM laser scanning innovations. The possibility of these innovations solving some current BIM challenges were also discussed.

Originality/value

The study provides an insight into the BIM research trends globally while identifying existing challenges. The study uses text mining of unstructured abstracts, which has not been reported in BIM research.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Akinlolu Temisola Mariam, Oladimeji Benedict Olalusi and Theo C. Haupt

This paper aims to present a meta-analysis and scientometric review to explore the intellectual evolution of research on the health and safety of women in construction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a meta-analysis and scientometric review to explore the intellectual evolution of research on the health and safety of women in construction, identify trends and research patterns and workplace stressors and hazards encountered by women in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of scientometric analysis and meta-analysis was adopted to systematically review 32 relevant studies from 1984 to 2020, to provide a holistic review of research on women’s health and safety in construction aimed to identify the trend of research development. Techniques such as co-authorship, keyword co-occurring and cluster analysis were adopted.

Findings

Five main themes summarized by clustering focusing on Workplace Psychological Health, HIV/AIDS and Construction Work, Occupational Health and Safety Injuries, Gender Inclusivity and Sexism in Construction and Gender-specific Health and Safety Analysis. Findings revealed a slow growth in women’s health and safety research with the USA, South Africa, Australia and Japan leading research development. Additionally, the major stressors or hazards faced by women in construction were found to be biological related hazards.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study are limited, resulting from the use of one abstract and citation database.

Practical implications

Findings from the study provide insights to the health and safety challenges of women in construction and identifies of knowledge gaps in the existing literature could provide researchers and industry practitioners with a comprehensive insight into intellectual landscapes, potential research frontiers on technologies for women’s construction health and safety.

Originality/value

While numerous studies have focused on the health and safety of workers in the construction industry, research on women’s health and safety is lacking. The study adopted a scientometric and meta-analysis approach to explore the intellectual evolution and reflect the research status on the subject.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nishani Harinarain and Theodore C. Haupt

– This paper aims to present the responses of students to various aspects of a cluster of discrete modules delivered using a studio-based learning pedagogy.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the responses of students to various aspects of a cluster of discrete modules delivered using a studio-based learning pedagogy.

Design/methodology/approach

A variation of a case study approach was used that included observations and a survey of student opinions on six constructs or themes after a period of eight weeks into the semester about their experience of studio-based learning in a three-module cluster. This paper only reports on the findings of the analysis of the self-administered survey of the views of students.

Findings

The student responses were analysed using SPSS (version 22). It is evident that the distinguishing features of the studio-based learning form of instructional delivery were reflected in their views despite the instructional space being far from ideal. However, given that this was their first experience they were apprehensive about the benefits of the approach to them personally especially in terms of whether their acquired knowledge base was broad enough for them to be confident about their future careers. The mapping of the learning outcomes of the modules against the project phases demonstrated that only the mode of transmission had in fact changed. Students were reticent about taking responsibility for their own learning possibly because they perceived that as being too risky.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited because the findings are based on a single case and a sample of students who had experienced eight weeks of studio-based learning of a cluster of three discrete modules in a revitalised construction program.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have implications for the way construction programs are delivered at institutions of higher education.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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