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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

David W. Drewery, Robert Sproule and T. Judene Pretti

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between a lifelong learning mindset and career success. A lifelong learning mindset is a way of approaching one's work…

1311

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between a lifelong learning mindset and career success. A lifelong learning mindset is a way of approaching one's work with curiosity, strategic thinking, and resilience. Career success refers to objective (e.g., number of promotions) and subjective (e.g., job satisfaction) indicators of progress and fulfillment in one's work.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are presented. Both studies draw from an accounting and finance program at a Canadian university. In study 1, data were collected from students (n = 62) and their supervisors at the end of a four-month co-operative education (co-op) work term. In study 2, data were collected from graduates (n = 148).

Findings

Results suggest that developing a lifelong learning mindset enhances both objective and subjective career success. Participants' lifelong learning mindset was associated with objective career success in both studies (supervisor-rated performance in study 1 and number of promotions in study 2). Lifelong learning mindset was associated with subjective career success in study 2 (job satisfaction, work engagement, and job-related self-efficacy) but not in study 1 (experience satisfaction).

Originality/value

This article presents the first empirical examination of the relationship between a lifelong learning mindset and career success. Insights from the article highlight the fact that educators and workplace managers might work together to promote a lifelong learning mindset for current and future workers.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Karsten E. Zegwaard, Matthew Campbell and T. Judene Pretti

Much rhetoric around the construct of a work-ready graduate has focused on the technical abilities of students to fulfill the expectations of the future workplace. Efforts have…

Abstract

Much rhetoric around the construct of a work-ready graduate has focused on the technical abilities of students to fulfill the expectations of the future workplace. Efforts have been made to extend from the technical skills (e.g., skills in calculation for engineers) to include soft or behavioral skills (e.g., communication). However, within previous models of understanding of the work-ready graduate there has been little done to explore them as critical moral agents within the workplace. That is, whilst the focus has been on being work-ready, it is argued here that in current and future workplaces it is more important for university graduates to be profession-ready. Our understanding of the profession-ready graduate is characterized by the ability to demonstrate capacities in critical thinking and reflection, and to have an ability to navigate the ethical challenges and shape the organizational culture of the future workplace.

This chapter aims to explore a movement of thinking away from simply aspiring to develop work-ready graduates, expanding this understanding to argue for the development of profession-ready graduates. The chapter begins with an exploration of the debates around the characteristics of being work-ready, and through a consideration of two professional elements: professional identity and critical moral agency, argues for a reframing of work-readiness towards professional-readiness. The chapter then considers the role of work-integrated learning (WIL) in being able to support the development of the profession-ready graduate.

Details

Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-859-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

David Drewery, Colleen Nevison and T Judene Pretti

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relative effects of participation in cooperative education (co-op) and engagement in reflection upon previous work experiences on…

1808

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relative effects of participation in cooperative education (co-op) and engagement in reflection upon previous work experiences on undergraduate students’ vocational self-concept (VSC) at graduation.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of graduating students (n=1,483) from a Canadian university was used. Regression models and a mediation analysis were used to test the influence of co-op on VSC through the mechanism of reflection.

Findings

Results suggest that both co-op and reflection on previous work experiences have direct effects on VSC, and that reflection partially mediates the relationship between degree type and VSC.

Research limitations/implications

This supports the role of work-integrated learning and self-reflection as critical determinants of students’ work-related learning outcomes, and co-op as a potential container in which reflection may occur.

Practical implications

Students should be given opportunity to reflect on their work-related experiences in order to strengthen their VSC. Institutions may integrate practices related to reflection in order for their students to reap the benefits of deeper learning.

Originality/value

This study represents an inaugural view of the potential links between self-reflection and the development of students’ VSC across both co-op and non-co-op degree types.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-859-8

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Work-Integrated Learning in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-859-8

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