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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Kelly A. Basile and T. Alexandra Beauregard

This paper aims to identify strategies used by successful teleworkers to create and maintain boundaries between work and home, and to determine how these strategies relate…

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3193

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify strategies used by successful teleworkers to create and maintain boundaries between work and home, and to determine how these strategies relate to employee preferences for segmentation or integration of work and home.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty in-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with employees working from home either occasionally (occasional teleworkers), between 20 and 50 per cent of the workweek (partial teleworkers), or the majority of the time (full teleworkers).

Findings

Teleworkers use physical, temporal, behavioral and communicative strategies to recreate boundaries similar to those found in office environments. Although teleworkers can generally develop strategies that align boundaries to their preferences for segmentation or integration, employees with greater job autonomy and control are better able to do so.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this research is its potential lack of generalizability to teleworkers in organizations with “always-on” cultures, who may experience greater pressure to allow work to permeate the home boundary.

Practical implications

These findings can encourage organizations to proactively assess employee preferences for boundary permeability before entering a teleworking arrangement. The boundary management tactics identified can be used to provide teleworkers struggling to establish comfortable boundaries with tangible ideas to regulate interactions between home and work.

Originality/value

This research makes a significant contribution to practitioner literature by applying a boundary management framework to the practice of teleworking, which is being adopted by organizations with increasing frequency.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

T. Alexandra Beauregard and Karin A. King

Employer-sponsored family-friendly events are designed to boost engagement and encourage retention by building family members’ identification with the organization. These…

Abstract

Purpose

Employer-sponsored family-friendly events are designed to boost engagement and encourage retention by building family members’ identification with the organization. These events are usually targeted at employees with dependent children, but LinkedIn’s more inclusive “Bring in Your Parents” (BIYP) initiative aims to introduce employees’ parents to the daily work of their adult children. This study evaluates the impact of BIYP on the attitudes and behavioral intentions of participating employees and their parents.

Design/methodology/approach

Repeated-measures surveys were conducted among participating employees and parents in six organizations in six countries (UK, Ireland, France, Brazil, Mexico and Colombia). These were followed by in-person interviews with participating employees (UK) and phone interviews with HR managers (Brazil, Canada, France, Spain, UK and USA).

Findings

Participation in BIYP increases employee engagement and parents’ instrumental and affective support for their children and for their children’s employers. Hosting BIYP is perceived to enhance corporate reputation among both internal and external stakeholders.

Practical implications

BIYP serves the dual function of building employee engagement and creating new parental brand ambassadors for participating organizations. BIYP can be an effective tool for employers to engage members of staff not traditionally included in organizational family-friendly events and may be particularly useful for firms with a high proportion of younger workers in tech-savvy jobs.

Originality/value

This evaluation of a new workplace initiative demonstrates measurable effects on important employee attitudes and behavioral intentions.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Tanja Gut, Lilith Whiley and T. Alexandra Beauregard

Human resource management (HRM) departments report a lack of knowledge on supporting transgender employees during gender transition in the workplace. The purpose of this…

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638

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource management (HRM) departments report a lack of knowledge on supporting transgender employees during gender transition in the workplace. The purpose of this research is to survey the experiences of transgender workers in English-, French- and German-speaking countries to evaluate their experience of transitioning at work and the HRM support they received to do so.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire consisting of 32 quantitative items and qualitative text boxes was completed by 166 transgender individuals.

Findings

Results show a mostly negative landscape with some pockets of good practice.

Research limitations/implications

Answers are based on self-report measures and data are cross-sectional.

Practical implications

Recommendations for good practice are proposed for HRM departments.

Social implications

A move towards a more inclusive workplace is needed.

Originality/value

Questions focus on HRM practices specifically, whereas other surveys have assessed work practices more broadly.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

T. Alexandra Beauregard, Maria Adamson, Aylin Kunter, Lilian Miles and Ian Roper

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research…

Abstract

Purpose

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research that contemplates the work–life interface in different geographic and cultural contexts, that explores the work–life experiences of minority, marginalized and/or underresearched groups of workers and that takes into account diverse arrangements made to fulfill both work and nonwork responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This introductory article first summarizes some of the emerging research in this area, introduces the papers in this special issue and links them to these themes and ends with highlighting the importance of using an intersectional lens in future investigations of the work–life interface.

Findings

These six articles provide empirically based insights, as well as new theoretical considerations for studying the interface between paid work and personal life roles. Compelling new research directions are identified.

Originality/value

Introducing the new articles in this special issue and reviewing recent research in this area brings together the work–life interface scholarship and diversity management studies and points to the necessity for future investigations to take an intersectional and contextualized approach to their subject matter.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2017

Gabriela Francke Rojo and T. Alexandra Beauregard

Although interest in inclusion is becoming widespread, there remains limited understanding of how organizations can create environments that promote inclusiveness and…

Abstract

Although interest in inclusion is becoming widespread, there remains limited understanding of how organizations can create environments that promote inclusiveness and unlock the benefits of workforce diversity. Additional research is needed to better understand how inclusion is conceptualized and experienced in contexts other than North America and Europe. Taking an exploratory approach, the present research seeks to answer the question of how employees in Peru – one of the most socially and economically unequal nations in Latin America – understand the concept of inclusion in the workplace. Semi-structured interviews with 30 employed individuals found that inclusion was generally described as comprising belongingness, uniqueness, and equal treatment. Six elements emerged as key to the creation of workplace inclusion: participation, positive relationships, equality, feeling valued, climate and culture, and positive work conditions. As inhabitants of a developing country with high levels of inequality and discrimination, Peruvian employees’ views provide valuable insight into how inclusion is lived and understood in such a context, and how it may be augmented.

Details

Management and Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-550-8

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

T. Alexandra Beauregard

The purpose of this paper is to report on a seminar sponsored by the Academy of Management's Gender in Management Special Interest Group, which comprised discussions on…

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4194

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a seminar sponsored by the Academy of Management's Gender in Management Special Interest Group, which comprised discussions on aspects of diversity policy, initiatives, and programme development within Bank of Scotland, National Australia Group UK, and BBC Scotland, and also academic and industry presentations.

Design/methodology/approach

The report is based upon observations, notes and discussions on a range of issues relating to diversity in organisations.

Findings

The seminar highlighted practitioner perspectives of diversity management – both for staff development and for the development of a customer base in the case of banks, by actively encouraging business from female entrepreneurs and by aiming to make mainstream financial products appropriate for both female and male customers.

Originality/value

This report brings together a number of interesting and important themes linked to improvements in female recruitment and development.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

T. Alexandra Beauregard

To examine the direct effects of work domain variables on family‐to‐work conflict (FWC), beyond their indirect effects via the mediating variable of work‐to‐family…

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1445

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the direct effects of work domain variables on family‐to‐work conflict (FWC), beyond their indirect effects via the mediating variable of work‐to‐family conflict (WFC), and sex differences in the effects of work role expectations and supervisor support on FWC.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 208 UK public sector employees. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis tested main and moderating effects of work domain variables and sex on FWC. To test for mediation, the procedure recommended by Baron and Kenny was used.

Findings

Work domain variables had a significant effect on FWC above and beyond the effects of family domain variables, and independent of WFC. The relationship between work role expectations and FWC was found to be significantly stronger for men than for women.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study does not permit firm conclusions regarding causality, and the results may be influenced by common method bias.

Practical implications

In the face of evidence that organizations are causing the very phenomenon that hurts them, the responsibility to assist employees with reducing FWC is enhanced. Particularly for men, management of organizational expectations to work long hours and prioritize work over family is an area in which employers can and should play a key role if gender equity with regard to organizational work‐family climate is to be established.

Originality/value

This study indicates that organizational work demands may have more influence over the degree to which employees’ family lives interfere with their work than has previously been assumed, especially for men.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

T. Alexandra Beauregard

This paper aims to examine personality as an alternative explanation to social exchange in predicting OCB, and investigate the moderating role of gender in the link…

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5047

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine personality as an alternative explanation to social exchange in predicting OCB, and investigate the moderating role of gender in the link between personality and OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 223 UK public sector employees. Multiple regression analysis tested main effects of personality and main and moderating effects of gender on OCB.

Findings

Findings indicate that personality has significant explanatory power beyond that of social exchange in predicting OCB. Employees with high levels of adaptive perfectionism report higher levels of OCB. General self‐efficacy also predicted more participation in citizenship behaviours, but only for men. Women appear to carry out citizenship behaviours regardless of how confident they feel in being able to successfully perform. This may be attributable to social and organizational norms that place women in the role of “helper” and expect more communal behaviours from them than from men.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study does not permit firm conclusions regarding causality, and the use of self‐report data carries with it the potential for common method bias.

Practical implications

The study's results suggest that encouraging adaptive perfectionistic behaviours and cognitions among employees (e.g. setting high personal standards for performance while taking setbacks in stride) may yield dividends in terms of OCB. Investing in general self‐efficacy training, especially for male employees, may also improve participation in citizenship behaviours.

Originality/value

This study extends previous work on personality by demonstrating that adaptive perfectionism can predict OCB. Existing research on gender and OCB was extended by the discovery that the role of self‐efficacy in predicting OCB may be particularly significant for men. Findings suggest that the use of social exchange theory as the predominant explanation for employees' performance of OCB may need to be reconsidered.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Soon-Ho Kim, Min-Seong Kim, Stephen Holland and Hye-Sook Han

This study aims to examine the impact of self-efficacy and reciprocity in predicting the organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) of hospitality employees and the…

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1286

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of self-efficacy and reciprocity in predicting the organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) of hospitality employees and the moderating role of cultural values in the hypothesized relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model of this study has been tested on the basis of the responses from 432 full-time employees who work at hospitality fields in South Korea. This study has conducted frequency, reliability, confirmatory factor, correlation analyses and structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The empirical results indicate not only that self-efficacy significantly influenced reciprocity, consideration, civic virtue and sportsmanship but also that reciprocity had positive influences on the same virtues as well as conscientiousness. The moderating role of cultural values has also been investigated resulting in significant differences in six of the nine cultural values measured (i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism I and II, assertiveness and gender egalitarianism).

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, the findings of this study yield several strategies relevant to hospitality employee development and training. Especially, the management in hospitality organizations needs to look at multicultural management and leadership styles within their own particular context.

Originality/value

Findings of this study suggest that both self-efficacy and reciprocity are important determinants of OCBs, and indicate the fundamental embeddedness of employment relations within the wider cultural value setting in non-Western contexts.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

T. Alexandra Beauregard

To examine the relative power of four dispositional, self‐evaluation traits (adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism, generalized self‐efficacy, and general self‐esteem…

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2188

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the relative power of four dispositional, self‐evaluation traits (adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism, generalized self‐efficacy, and general self‐esteem) versus three situational factors (organizational time demands, potential negative career consequences, and managerial support) in predicting work interference with home (WIH) and home interference with work (HIW).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 223 UK public sector employees. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis tested main effects of personality and situational characteristics on WIH and HIW. A usefulness analysis determined whether dispositional or situational variables had greater predictive power for the two dependent variables.

Findings

Significant, negative main effects of adaptive perfectionism on HIW, and of self‐esteem on WIH. Positive relationships were found between maladaptive perfectionism and both WIH and HIW. Situational factors were also significant predictors of WHI: organizational time demands were positively associated with WIH, while managerial support had a negative relationship with WIH. Dispositional variables accounted for 15 per cent of variance in HIW, but only 4 per cent of variance in WIH.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study does not permit firm conclusions regarding causality, and the results may be influenced by common method bias.

Practical implications

Raising awareness of the role of personality in work‐home interference may assist managers in providing more effective support to employees. The danger exists that policy‐makers will dismiss HIW as an individual responsibility due to the influence of dispositional factors.

Originality/value

This study indicates that self‐evaluation personality characteristics play a key role in predicting HIW, and are more important than traditionally investigated factors associated with the home and workplace environments.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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