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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Liang Tian and Yu Luo

The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively investigate the effect of process parameters (including welding current, voltage and speed) and plate thickness on in-plane…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively investigate the effect of process parameters (including welding current, voltage and speed) and plate thickness on in-plane inherent deformations in typical fillet welded joint; meanwhile, the plastic strains remaining in the weld zone are also analyzed under different influencing factors.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the purpose of this study, a thermal-elastic-plastic finite element (TEP FE) model is developed to analyze the thermal-mechanical behavior of the T-welded joint during the welding process. Experimental measurements have verified the validity of the established TEP FE model. Using the effective model, a series of numerical experiments are performed to obtain the inherent deformations under the conditions of different influencing factors, and then the calculation results are discussed based on the relevant data obtained.

Findings

Through numerical simulation analysis, it is found that the longitudinal and transverse inherent deformations decrease with the increase of welding speed and plate thickness, whereas as the nominal heat input increases, the inherent deformations increase significantly. The longitudinal shrinkage presents a quasi-linear and nonlinear distribution in the middle and end of the weld, respectively. The plastic strains in the cross section of the T-joint also vary greatly because of the process parameters and plate thickness, but the maximum value always appears near the location of the welding toe, which means that this point faces a relatively large risk of fatigue cracking. The inherent deformations are closely related to the plastic strains remaining in the weld zone and are also affected by many influencing factors such as process parameters and plate thickness.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, relatively few influencing factors such as welding current, voltage, speed and plate thickness are considered to analyze the inherent deformations in the T-welded joint. Also, these influencing factors are all within a certain range of parameters, which shows that only limited applicability can be provided. In addition, only in-plane inherent deformations are considered in this study, without considering the other two out-of-plane components of inherent deformations.

Originality/value

This study can help to expand the understanding of the relationship between the inherent deformations and its influencing factors for a specific form of the welded joint, and can also provide basic data to supplement the inherent deformation database, thereby facilitating further researches on welding deformations for stiffened-panel structures in shipbuilding or steel bridges.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Mayur Pratap Singh, Pavan Kumar Meena, Kanwer Singh Arora, Rajneesh Kumar and Dinesh Kumar Shukla

This paper aims to measure peak temperatures and cooling rates for distinct locations of thermocouples in the butt weld joint of mild steel plates. For experimental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure peak temperatures and cooling rates for distinct locations of thermocouples in the butt weld joint of mild steel plates. For experimental measurement of peak temperatures, K-type thermocouples coupled with a data acquisition system were used at predetermined locations. Thereafter, Rosenthal’s analytical models for thin two-dimensional (2D) and thick three-dimensional (3D) plates were adopted to predict peak temperatures for different thermocouple positions. A finite element model (FEM) based on an advanced prescribed temperature approach was adopted to predict time-temperature history for predetermined locations of thermocouples.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparing experimental and Rosenthal analytical models (2D and 3D) findings show that predicted and measured peak temperatures are in close agreement, while cooling rates predicted by analytical models (2D, 3D) show significant variation from measured values. On the other hand, 3D FEM simulation predicted peak temperatures and cooling rates for different thermocouple positions are close to experimental findings.

Findings

The inclusion of filler metal during simulation of welding rightly replicates the real welding situation and improves outcomes of the analysis.

Originality/value

The present study is an original contribution to the field of welding technology.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1963

Equipment, Programmes, Techniques and Projects. An automatic circuit tester, a new product of the Automatic Test Equipment Division of Elliott‐Automation, enables…

Abstract

Equipment, Programmes, Techniques and Projects. An automatic circuit tester, a new product of the Automatic Test Equipment Division of Elliott‐Automation, enables unskilled operators to test rapidly and accurately the continuity and insulation of complex cable‐forms, printed‐circuit boards and circuits incorporating relays and similar devices. It can detect faults often missed in conventional production‐testing and inspection procedures and can test installed equipment to locate faults in complex electrical and electronic apparatus. It can also be used for making resistance measurements.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Shantanu Kumar Das and Abinash Kumar Swain

This paper aims to present the classification, representation and extraction of adhesively bonded assembly features (ABAFs) from the computer-aided design (CAD) model.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the classification, representation and extraction of adhesively bonded assembly features (ABAFs) from the computer-aided design (CAD) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The ABAFs are represented as a set of faces with a characteristic arrangement among the faces among parts in proximity suitable for adhesive bonding. The characteristics combination of the faying surfaces and their topological relationships help in classification of ABAFs. The ABAFs are classified into elementary and compound types based on the number of assembly features exist at the joint location.

Findings

A set of algorithms is developed to extract and identify the ABAFs from CAD model. Typical automotive and aerospace CAD assembly models have been used to illustrate and validate the proposed approach.

Originality/value

New classification and extraction methods for ABAFs are proposed, which are useful for variant design.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1939

Bronislaw Bochenek

SOME kinds of chrome‐molybdenum steels widely employed in the construction of aeroplanes, the chrome‐manganese‐silicon steels introduced comparatively recently and even…

Abstract

SOME kinds of chrome‐molybdenum steels widely employed in the construction of aeroplanes, the chrome‐manganese‐silicon steels introduced comparatively recently and even some carbon steels with a higher content than 0·2 per cent. carbon show minute cracks after welding with oxy‐acctylene, even when the actual operation of welding is carried out faultlessly. This tendency is described as “weld‐crackability,” cracking occurring at high temperatures. At first, micro‐fractures form, causing in turn the formation of cracks that are visible at a temperature still high enough to cover their surface with a dark bluish flux. These cracks occur not only in the weld itself but also in the whole of the region affected by the thermic influence of the flame. It is characteristic that welding by an electric are does not produce this phenomenon.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 11 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1952

K.K. Khrenoff, M.N. Gapchenko and G.P. Sakhatzky

The authors describe tests on the carbon are welding of corrosion‐resisting magnesium alloy. Recommended pract ice covers the use of fluxes, welding procedures and welding

Abstract

The authors describe tests on the carbon are welding of corrosion‐resisting magnesium alloy. Recommended pract ice covers the use of fluxes, welding procedures and welding conditions, and preparation and positioning of components. Mechanical and metallographic tests and general inspection lead to the conclusion that all types of joints can be carried out, giving good appearance and sound welds, but somewhat lower mechanical properties. Subsequent heat treatment improves uniformity, but not mechanical strength.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Mariana D. Banea, Lucas F.M. da Silva and Raul D.S.G. Campilho

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the techniques which are used and developed for adhesive bulk and joint specimens manufacturing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the techniques which are used and developed for adhesive bulk and joint specimens manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

After a short introduction, the paper discusses various techniques for adhesive bulk and joint specimens manufacturing and highlights their advantages and limitations. A number of examples in the form of different bulk and joint specimens of different types of adhesives are used to show the methods for determining the adhesive's mechanical properties needed for design in adhesive technology. In order to predict the adhesive joint strength, the stress distribution and a suitable failure criterion are essential. If a continuum mechanics approach is used, the availability of the stress‐strain curve of the adhesive is sufficient (the bulk tensile test or the TAST test is used). For fracture mechanics‐based design, mode I and mode II toughness is needed (DCB and ENF tests are used). Finally, single lap joints (SLJs) are used to assess the adhesive's performance in a joint.

Findings

Before an adhesive can be specified for an application, screening tests should be conducted in order to compare and evaluate the various adhesion parameters. Properties of adhesives can vary greatly and an appropriate selection is essential for a proper joint design. Thus, to determine the stresses and strains in adhesive joints in a variety of configurations, it is necessary to characterize the adhesive behaviour in order to know its mechanical properties. A great variety of test geometries and specimens are used to obtain adhesive properties. However, for manufacturing of adhesive bulk specimens and joints necessary for use in these tests, properly, moulds should be designed.

Originality/value

The paper summarises the main methods of preparing adhesive bulk and joint specimens and the test methods for determining the mechanical properties needed for design in adhesive technology. Emphasis is given to the preparation of specimens of suitable quality for mechanical property determination and the moulds designed for this purpose.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Chien-Yuan Hou

The purpose of this paper is to complete fatigue analysis of welded joints considering both the crack initiation sites and crack coalescence, and to generate virtual welded

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complete fatigue analysis of welded joints considering both the crack initiation sites and crack coalescence, and to generate virtual welded specimens for computer simulation of fatigue life on a specimen-by-specimen basis; knowledge regarding the weld toe stress concentration factor (SCF) sequence is essential. In this study, attempts were made to analyze the sequence and to find a simple method to generate the sequence using computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Laser scanning technique was used to acquire the real three-dimensional weld toe geometry of welded specimens. The scanned geometry was digitally sectioned, and three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the scanned specimens were constructed and the weld toe SCF sequence was calculated. The numbers in the sequence were analyzed using a simple autoregression model and the statistical properties of the sequence were acquired.

Findings

The autoregression analysis showed the value of a weld toe SCF is linearly related to its neighboring factor with a high correlation. When a factor value at a toe location is known, the neighboring factor can be simulated by a simple linear equation with a random residual. The weld toe factor sequence can thus be formed by repeatedly using the linear equation with a residual. The generated sequence exhibits close statistical properties to those of the real sequence obtained from FE results.

Practical implications

When the weld toe SCF sequence is known, it is possible to foresee potential crack locations and the subsequent crack coalescence. The results of the current study will be the foundation for the future work on fatigue analysis of welded joints considering the effects of crack initiation site and crack coalescence.

Originality/value

The weld toe SCF sequence was rarely discussed previously because of a lack of the available data. The current study is the first work to investigate the statistical properties of the sequence and found that a simple autoregression equation can be used to perform the analysis. This study is also the first work that successfully generates a weld toe SCF sequence, which can be used to simulate virtual welded specimens.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jaroslav Mackerle

Gives a bibliographical review of the finite element analyses of sandwich structures from the theoretical as well as practical points of view. Both isotropic and composite…

Abstract

Gives a bibliographical review of the finite element analyses of sandwich structures from the theoretical as well as practical points of view. Both isotropic and composite materials are considered. Topics include: material and mechanical properties of sandwich structures; vibration, dynamic response and impact problems; heat transfer and thermomechanical responses; contact problems; fracture mechanics, fatigue and damage; stability problems; special finite elements developed for the analysis of sandwich structures; analysis of sandwich beams, plates, panels and shells; specific applications in various fields of engineering; other topics. The analysis of cellular solids is also included. The bibliography at the end of this paper contains 655 references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with presented subjects that were published between 1980 and 2001.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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