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Article

Christian Barth and Stefan Koch

In the last years the penetration of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems within small, medium and large organizations increased steadily. Organizations are forced…

Abstract

Purpose

In the last years the penetration of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems within small, medium and large organizations increased steadily. Organizations are forced to adapt their systems and perform ERP upgrades in order to react to rapidly changing business environments, technological enhancements and rising pressure of competition. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the critical success factors for such projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature review and qualitative interviews with CEOs, CIOs, ERP consultants and project managers who recently carried out ERP upgrade projects in their respective organizations.

Findings

This paper identifies 14 critical success factors for ERP upgrade projects. Amongst others, effective project management, external support, the composition of the ERP team and the usage of a multiple system landscape play a key role for the success of the ERP upgrade. Furthermore, a comparison to the critical success factors for ERP implementation projects was conducted, and even though there are many similarities between these types of projects, several differences emerged.

Originality/value

ERP upgrade projects have a huge impact on organizations, but their success and antecedents for it are currently under-researched.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Gerald Feldman, Hanifa Shah, Craig Chapman and Ardavan Amini

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is a complex undertaking that recurs throughout the systems’ life span, therefore, organisations need to adopt strategies and methodologies…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is a complex undertaking that recurs throughout the systems’ life span, therefore, organisations need to adopt strategies and methodologies that can minimise disruptions and risks associated with upgrades. The purpose of this paper is to explore the processes undertaken during upgrading ES, to identify the upgrade project stages.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is grounded in a qualitative survey approach, and utilises a web-based survey questionnaire and semi-structured interviews as methods for data collection. The data were gathered from 41 respondents’ and analysed using qualitatively inductive content analysis principles to derive meaning and to identify the trends about upgrade processes.

Findings

The study findings stress the importance of adopting a methodical approach to ES upgrades. Also, it suggests that due consideration should be given to the impact of new version features and functionality, the risks and the effort required for supporting upgrade projects.

Research limitations/implications

The five-stage upgrade process model can be utilised as a strategy to minimise complexity and risks associated with upgrade projects. However, this study only proposes logical generalisations; therefore, future studies could explore these stages in-depth to offer generalisable arguments applicable to ES upgrade phenomenon.

Originality/value

The study proposes a five-stage upgrade process model that offers a systematic approach to support upgrade projects. The proposed model extends previous models by proposing alternative strategies to support ES upgrade projects.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article

Gerald Feldman, Hanifa Shah, Craig Chapman and Ardavan Amini

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is a complex phenomenon, yet it is possible to reduce the complexity through understanding of the upgrade drivers. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is a complex phenomenon, yet it is possible to reduce the complexity through understanding of the upgrade drivers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the various upgrade drivers, in order to provide a detailed understanding of the factors driving upgrade decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is grounded in a qualitative survey design. It utilises a web-based survey questionnaire and semi-structured interviews to collect data from 41 respondents representing 23 large organisations. The data were qualitatively analysed and coded to identify the various drivers and their influence on ES upgrade decisions.

Findings

The findings suggest that the upgrade decisions are dependent on establishing the need to upgrade, which is influenced by various drivers and stakeholders interests. In addition, the findings suggest that organisations would only opt to upgrade when benefits are aligned with the upgrade and when the decision makes business sense.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, the authors propose that there is a relationship between the upgrade drivers and the upgrade strategy. However, qualitative studies can only formulate logical generalisations. Hence, future research could explore these associations through a quantitative study in order to provide probabilistic generalisation that offers either similar or conflicting arguments applicable to ES upgrade phenomenon.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative classification of upgrade drivers, and conceptualises an association between upgrade drivers and the upgrade strategy, which in turn facilitates minimising disruptions and upgrade risks.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Gerald Feldman, Hanifa Shah, Craig Chapman, Erika A. Pärn and David J. Edwards

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is fundamental to maintaining a system’s continuous improvement and stability. However, while the extant literature is replete with…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise systems (ES) upgrade is fundamental to maintaining a system’s continuous improvement and stability. However, while the extant literature is replete with research on ES upgrade decision-making, there is scant knowledge about how different decision processes facilitate this decision to upgrade. This paper aims to investigate and better understand these processes from an organisational perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative survey design, and used a Web-based questionnaire and semi-structured interviews to collect data from 23 large organisations. Data accrued were qualitatively analysed and manually coded to identify the various decision processes undertaken during ES upgrade decisions.

Findings

Analysis results reveal complex interrelations between the upgrade drivers, the need to evaluate the new version’s functionality and the upgrade impact. Understanding the interaction between these elements influences the upgrade decision process.

Research limitations/implications

The study proposes ES upgrade processes that support a decision to upgrade major releases. Further research is required to offer either similar or conflicting arguments on the upgrade decision-making and provide a probabilistic generalisation of the decision-making processes.

Originality/value

The research offers a comprehensive and empirically supported methodical approach that embraces an evaluation of a new version’s functionality, technical requirements and concomitant upgrade implications as intrinsic decision processes. This approach assists in the decisions to establish the upgrade need and determine the level of change, effort required, impacts and associated benefits.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article

Walt Crawford

How can you call yourself a serious computer user if you don't have a 33MHz 486 system with a 16″ 1024×768 Super VGA screen and 300MB disk drive? Run right out and get the…

Abstract

How can you call yourself a serious computer user if you don't have a 33MHz 486 system with a 16″ 1024×768 Super VGA screen and 300MB disk drive? Run right out and get the new goodies—otherwise, you're wasting your precious time. The above is an extreme position. On the other hand, if you're still using the equivalent of an IBM PC/XT (or, worse yet, an original PC), you're at the other extreme. Quite apart from the hype, you would almost certainly benefit from a more powerful PC. For most of us in the real world who are spending real dollars for equipment to serve real needs, the decisions can be tough: upgrade, replace, or let it be? And, if upgrading is the answer, what should you upgrade? This column deals with hardware questions. While there are few firm rules, there are some reasonable guidelines to consider. The author also provides notes from January‐June 1991 PC literature; it's been a great period for powermongers!

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Antonio C. Caputo and Pacifico M. Pelagagge

This paper aims to discuss some relevant issues in the design and operation of material handling and storage systems (MH&SS) characterized by complex material flows and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss some relevant issues in the design and operation of material handling and storage systems (MH&SS) characterized by complex material flows and high‐traffic intensity. The paper seeks to provide solution examples and an analysis methodology to face large increases of materials flows through a redesign of the material handling and storage system.

Design/methodology/approach

At first, possible strategies to improve system performances when facing strong increments of material flows are presented and discussed. A significant case study is then analyzed in order to present a practical application of the proposed methodology. Resorting to discrete‐events simulation, the alternatives are verified, correct design choices are identified, and the resources are properly sized to develop a streamlined layout.

Findings

The paper recognises that design and upgrade of intensive material handling systems is a complex task asking for a careful study of alternatives and detailed system analysis, otherwise capacity problems and bottleneck phenomena may not be effectively solved.

Research limitations/implications

This work focuses on a specific case study. The paper, therefore, will be of interest mainly to managers and designers of similar plants and large – intensive material handling systems.

Practical implications

The paper shows how the correct planning and analysis of design alternatives integrated with a detailed system simulation enable a drastic reduction of bottleneck phenomena, thus meeting the required capacity improvement goals when upgrading and redesigning complex and high‐volume material handling systems.

Originality/value

The paper, while providing insights to practitioners engaged in design and management of complex MH&SS, outlines a methodological approach which can be useful when facing major capacity improvement projects.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article

John Dadzie, Goran Runeson and Grace Ding

Estimates show that close to 90% of the buildings we will need in 2050 are already built and occupied. The increase in the existing building stock has affected energy…

Abstract

Purpose

Estimates show that close to 90% of the buildings we will need in 2050 are already built and occupied. The increase in the existing building stock has affected energy consumption thereby negatively impacting the environment. The purpose of this paper is to assess determinants of sustainable upgrade of existing buildings through the adoption and application of sustainable technologies. The study also ranks sustainable technologies adopted by the professionals who participated in the survey with an in-built case study.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of the overall methodology, a detailed literature review on the nature and characteristics of sustainable upgrade and the sustainable technologies adopted was undertaken. A survey questionnaire with an in-built case study was designed to examine all the sustainable technologies adopted to improve energy consumption in Australia. The survey was administered to sustainability consultants, architects, quantity surveyors, facility managers and engineers in Australia.

Findings

The results show a total of 24 technologies which are mostly adopted to improve energy consumption in existing buildings. A factor analysis shows the main components as: lighting and automation, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HAVC) systems and equipment, envelope, renewable energy and passive technologies.

Originality/value

The findings bridge the gap in the literature on the adoption and application of sustainable technologies to upgrade existing buildings. The technologies can be adopted to reduce the excessive energy consumption patterns in existing buildings.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article

Gary Pan, Sayyen Teoh and Poh Sun Seow

The purpose of this paper has been to address the research question of how are the processes of resource enrichment and capability deployment coordinated during…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper has been to address the research question of how are the processes of resource enrichment and capability deployment coordinated during information technology (IT) implementation at a small- and medium-sized accounting firm (SMAF)? Increasingly, organizations need to respond to a wide range of IT-based opportunities and pressures. The situation is no different in an accounting firm. Many accounting practitioners have advocated investment in IT to improve accounting firms’ productivity. To date, there are many instances of how IT has radically transformed the nature of accounting practice. Nevertheless, little is known about how IT capability is developed in SMAFs. In particular, the resource enrichment process during IT capability development has been understudied.

Design/methodology/approach

The strategy of this paper was to undertake qualitative case research of an ERP systems upgrading project at SMAF. The case study approach is particularly appropriate for this exploratory study because it allows the capture of organizational dynamics of the phenomenon better (Newman and Sabherwal, 1996; Yin, 2003). Its strength also lies in its ability to explain the phenomenon based on the interpretation of data (Klein and Myers, 1999). Next, the paper will explain the case study approach. It approached fieldwork at SMAF, with a premise that resource enrichment and capability development exist and are identifiable using an existing theoretical lens. Accordingly, this study draws on Sirmon et al. (2007) ’s concept of resource enrichment process and objectively studied the IT capability development process through the resource enrichment lens. At the same time, it was recognized that resource enrichment and capability development may have their own unique characteristics, unrelated to any theoretical models offered in the organizational literature.

Findings

The purpose of this paper has been to address the research question of how resource enrichment process may occur during IT capability development process of an SMAF. This study used a resource-based view of firms as its analytical lens. The study has drawn on SMAF’s sage ACCPAC ERP solution (ACCPAC) system upgrading experience by interviewing relevant project stakeholders and reviewing secondary data extensively. Our analysis identified two actions that were instrumental in enriching resources in the IT capability development process: collective leadership and managing change. Three attributes that supported the resource-enrichment process include effective governance structure, extensive IT knowledge and business experience, and stakeholder commitment. In addition, two coordinating mechanisms were put in place to enable an organization to transform existing resource and capability: informational and IT structure.

Originality/value

From research point of view, this paper makes several theoretical contributions. First, this study has contributed to the accounting information systems literature by examining the transformation processes of resource and capability enrichment during IT implementation of a context that is little known. It helps to address the call for more research into IT use and the impact of such tools by SMAFs by Omoteso and Sangster (2011). Second, this study extends the understanding of the IT capability development process by demonstrating how an organization developed IT capability. Through this case, how fundamental resources can be leveraged through specific actions and strategies undertaken have been uncovered. The empirical evidence gathered in the case of SMAF provides useful insights into how resources and capabilities may be enabled. Third, the coordination of the resource and capability transformation contributes to theory development as the coordination mechanisms derived from this analysis offer an insights into how a set of enriched resources and capabilities are synchronized during IT implementation.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article

Udayan Nandkeolyar, Amrik S. Sohal and Graham Burt

Reports on the computer‐aided design (CAD) upgrade implementation process at PBR Automotive Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Australia. Views the implementation as successful since…

Abstract

Reports on the computer‐aided design (CAD) upgrade implementation process at PBR Automotive Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Australia. Views the implementation as successful since many of the desired outcomes have been achieved or surpassed. The key success factors were detailed planning, user involvement and vendor support. These combined to create an atmosphere of excitement in the project and success. Reports on the future plans that include the development of an integrated information system at PBR which will involve customers and suppliers in addition to internal personnel. The CAD system upgrade serves as a launching board for the development of such a system.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Youngwook Ha

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the gap between the expected benefit of the current system and that of the future upgraded system affects consumer behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the gap between the expected benefit of the current system and that of the future upgraded system affects consumer behavior when adopting a new technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The study extends the regret theory to establish a structural model of expectations gap, anticipated regret, and behavior intention. Next, it conducts an online survey on the potential users of intelligent closed circuit television for home use.

Findings

The expected benefit of the current system is not only a direct precedence factor for consumer behavior, but also forms the anticipated regret through comparison with the expected benefit of the upgraded system in the future, thereby proving that this ultimately affects consumer behavior.

Originality/value

Regret is an interesting emotion that could have significant impact on consumers’ adoption/purchasing behaviors. While there are some studies in the IS literature on regret, it is still understudied. This study analyzes the characteristics of IT products with rapid technological change in terms of consumers’ regret.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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