Search results

1 – 10 of over 251000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Cory Searcy, Stanislav Karapetrovic and Daryl McCartney

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a systems approach can be used to facilitate the development of an organizational performance measurement system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a systems approach can be used to facilitate the development of an organizational performance measurement system.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature, the paper introduces the implications for applying a systems approach to organizational performance measurement. To demonstrate the transition from theory to practice, a case study is provided to show how a sustainable development performance measurement system was developed at a Canadian electric utility. The case study involved extensive consultation with over 25 experts.

Findings

The paper finds that a systems approach is useful in developing the process and that a set of formal systems criteria is useful in developing the structure and content of a performance measurement system. These concepts are highlighted throughout the case study example.

Research limitations/implications

The case study section was based on findings from a single organization. Further work is required to validate the findings within other organizations.

Practical implications

The paper shows how a robust sustainable development performance measurement system may be developed at an electric utility. The overarching emphasis on integration of the system with the case utility's mainstream initiatives demonstrates that a performance measurement system must build on what the organization already has in place. The systems‐based approach and formal systems criteria used in the paper may be transferable to other organizations.

Originality/value

The paper shows that a systems approach provides both the structure and flexibility needed to guide the design, implementation, and evolution of a sustainable development performance measurement system within existing organizational infrastructure.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Dejana Zlatanović and Matjaž Mulej

Respecting the growing importance of interdependence of knowledge, values and social responsibility, the purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

Respecting the growing importance of interdependence of knowledge, values and social responsibility, the purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of knowledge-cum-values management and to show how some soft systems approaches can support interdependence of knowledge and human values resulting in socially responsible innovative behavior, hence in success.

Design/methodology/approach

The selected soft systems approaches are used to double-check the usefulness of the requisitely holistic approach to knowledge-cum-values management and innovation. The applied methodology for qualitative analysis is the Dialectical Systems Theory.

Findings

One-sidedness, unlike the requisite holism, causes oversights and hence disables innovations as a new users’ benefit. Requisitely holistic knowledge-cum-values management prevents one-sidedness and therefore many oversights; hence it is a valuable driver of innovation. It is supported by social responsibility (exposing the systemic behavior by suggesting interdependence and holistic approach to one’s responsibility for one’s influences on society). By including values and by enabling consideration of interdependence of human values and knowledge, some soft systems approaches support innovative behavior with social responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to theoretical findings resulting from authors’ previous empirical studies. The novel concept “knowledge-cum-values” erases the human dangerous one-sidedness resulting from the irrational rationalistic division of the two. Social responsibility supports informal use of some soft systems theories and diminishes this danger.

Practical implications

The practical application of the selected soft systems approaches and social responsibility offers great possibilities for managers to improve the holism of their innovation processes, driven by knowledge-cum-values management. Fewer oversights are possible and lead to fewer mistakes and more success in the invention-innovation-diffusion processes. No human is rational or emotional only, either as a creator or as a consumer, but this fact is disregarded in the management literature.

Social implications

Social responsibility shall be considered as an important novel soft-system approach and part of organizational innovative behavior aimed to replace the one-sided approaches prevailing so far and causing crises: the overseen attributes do not cease, but they still impact life and are out of control.

Originality/value

The contribution introduces the new, still insufficiently researched concept of knowledge-cum-values management; it highlights new ways of attaining the requisitely holistic knowledge-cum-values management that enhances enterprise’s innovation capacity by requisite holism, supported by social responsibility.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2010

Tony Kazda and Bob Caves

Abstract

Details

Airport Design and Operation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-054643-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2015

Tony Kazda and Bob Caves

Abstract

Details

Airport Design and Operation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-869-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Manuel Mühlburger, Stefan Oppl and Christian Stary

Deployment of knowledge management systems (KMSs) suffers from low adoption in organizational reality that is attributed to a lack of perceivable added value for people in…

Abstract

Purpose

Deployment of knowledge management systems (KMSs) suffers from low adoption in organizational reality that is attributed to a lack of perceivable added value for people in actual work situations. Poor task/technology fit in the process of knowledge retrieval appears to be a major factor influencing this issue. Existing research indicates a lack of re-contextualizing stored information provided by KMSs in a particular situation. Existing research in the area of organizational memory information systems (OMISs) has thoroughly examined and widely discussed the topic of re-contextualization. The purpose of this paper, thus, is to examine how KMS design can benefit from OMIS research on approaches for re-contextualization in knowledge retrieval.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines OMIS literature and inductively derives a categorization scheme for KMS according to their strategy of re-contextualizing knowledge. The authors have validated the scheme validated in a multiple case study that examines the differentiatory value of the scheme for approaches with various re-contextualization strategies.

Findings

The classification scheme allows a step-by-step selection of approaches for re-contextualization of information in KMS design and development derived from OMIS research. The case study has demonstrated the applicability of the developed scheme and shows that the differentiation criteria can be applied unambiguously.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen case study approach for validation, the validation results may lack generalizability.

Practical implications

The scheme enables an informed selection of KMSs appropriate for a particular OMIS use case, as the scheme’s attributes serve as design rationale for a certain architecture or constellation of components. Developers can not only select from various approaches when designing re-contextualizaton but also come up with rationales for each candidate because of structured representation. Hence, stakeholders can be supported in a more informed way and design KMSs more effectively along organizational change processes.

Originality/value

The paper addresses an identified need for systematic characterization of KMS approaches and systems intending to meet the objectives of OMISs. As such, it allows streamlining further research in this field, as approaches can be judged according to their originality and positioned relative to each other.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Fatma Mizikaci

To propose an evaluation model for the quality implementations in higher education through an analysis of quality systems and program evaluation using a systems approach.

Abstract

Purpose

To propose an evaluation model for the quality implementations in higher education through an analysis of quality systems and program evaluation using a systems approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical background, research and practice of the quality systems in higher education and program evaluation are analysed in conjunction with the concepts of systems approach. The analysis leads to a systems approach‐based program‐evaluation model for quality implementation in higher education.

Findings

The three concepts, quality systems in higher education, program evaluation and systems approach, are found to be consistent and compatible with one another with regard to the goals and organizational structure of the higher education institutions. The proposed evaluation model provides a new perspective for higher education management for the effective and efficient implementation of the quality systems and program improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation of the model in a real university setting is necessary for the clarification of the processes.

Practical implications

The study provides a constructive analysis of higher‐education‐related concepts, and a new dimension of quality systems and program evaluation is developed in the model. The approach comprises three subsystems; “social system”, “technical systems”, and “managerial system”. The evaluation of quality in higher education requires inquiry of the components of the systems.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an innovative evaluation model integrating the systems approach into quality tools. The model is claimed to be the first in integrating the three approaches.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Sameer Kumar and Sant Arora

A mixed two‐level system is considered for partsdistribution. Three approaches are studied for thedivision of the total item set S into subsets S⊂1 andS⊂2. The subset S⊂1…

Abstract

A mixed two‐level system is considered for parts distribution. Three approaches are studied for the division of the total item set S into subsets S⊂1 and S⊂2. The subset S⊂1 includes items directly served by the company to the end‐users and subset S⊂2 includes items served through dealers. These approaches are dealer item‐based, company item‐based and system‐based. The systems approach is compared with the two item‐based approaches from the dealer′s and company′s point of view. A market sensitivity model is developed in the systems approach, which considers the effect of customer service (primarily average delivery time and number of items in set S⊂2) on the captured market share. Optimisation of total expected profit, based on a system′s approach, leads to higher profit levels and to a larger subset S⊂2 than obtained from the two item‐based approaches.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

A. Espinosa

To explore the usefulness of the cybernetic approach to support development programs by offering a theoretical framework that helps us to re‐understand development and…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the usefulness of the cybernetic approach to support development programs by offering a theoretical framework that helps us to re‐understand development and measuring systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a summary of Beer's theory for organisational development and measuring systems, shows examples of application in design and implementation of socio‐economic development programs in Colombia, and uses them to explore the usefulness of the approach in this field.

Findings

Analysis of the reported examples shows a clear indication of the usefulness of Beer's approach to design and measure development programs. It reveals an important field for applied research that could benefit from further applications of the approach.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences analysed here showed the strength or alliances between government, universities and development agencies, for applied research. It makes clear that more long‐term oriented projects are required to fully implement innovative approaches like the one described.

Practical implications

Applying a cybernetic approach in this field implies changing from top‐down to bottom‐up design; wider involvement of stakeholders to agree on critical measurements; changes from emphasis in technological and managerial improvements, to improvements in learning and self‐control tools for the developing communities.

Originality/value

Even if there has been agreement on the convenience of experimenting with more holistic approaches to socio‐economic development, few researchers show the potential of the cybernetic approach, as this paper does.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Gary J. Summers and Christopher M. Scherpereel

This paper proposes a relationship between decision making and key qualities of business systems.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a relationship between decision making and key qualities of business systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explore the relationship between decision making and systems by contrasting the decision making in two well‐known systems: MRP and JIT. The two systems present two sets of opposing qualities. By considering the relationship between a decision and its environment, we propose that these sets of qualities are not unique to MRP and JIT. They arise from two general approaches to decision making. Having introduced the two approaches, we analyze three product development systems: Stage‐Gate, Agile and Lean.

Findings

In manufacturing, MRP is a push system; JIT is a pull system. MRP seeks perfection; JIT seeks consistency. MRP gives decision makers great discretion; JIT constrains decisions. These opposing qualities, and others, arise from two general approaches to decision making: outside‐in and inside‐out. As the difficulty of decisions increase, relative to a decision maker's ability, the cost of mistakes becomes significant. In these situations, the inside‐out approach should outperform the outside‐in approach. The inside‐out approach constrains decision making to limit the cost of errors. The outside‐in approach embraces complexity, exposing itself to more decision errors. In product development, the Lean and Agile systems exploit the inside‐out approach. They constrain decisions and reduce the cost of errors that arise from two sources. Lean addresses interactions, which add complexity to business systems. Agile addresses unpredictability, which adds uncertainty to business systems.

Originality/value

The relationships the authors propose show how decision making affects the development, control and performance of business systems.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 251000