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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Linda J. Vandergriff

This paper seeks to explore new complex venture approaches needed because the classical twentieth century system engineering model does not accommodate the complexities of

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore new complex venture approaches needed because the classical twentieth century system engineering model does not accommodate the complexities of twenty‐first century ventures, especially those with significant knowledge management components.

Design/methodology/approach

A complexity literature review was performed to identify the attributes of complex ventures. Then the fundamental differences in defining, developing, and implementing complicated traditional systems and complex ventures were explored. The resultant complex venture model builds on the insights derived from chaos and complexity theories; observations of several acquisition successes and failures; and doctoral research on agile enterprise decision support.

Findings

Successful traditional systems engineering complicated systems models' built‐in assumptions do not scale to the needed twenty‐first century complex solutions. It is necessary to develop a complex venture model that guides the engineering solutions that: describe complex ventures as flows of intelligence, energy and matter provide value in a dynamic co‐evolving context; provide leadership, not control, with clear and consistent venture‐wide vision that guides empowered individual agent decision making; institute tiered situationally‐aware decision making in both time and place; address factors (material and non‐material) contributing to solution success; provide for rapidly changing context and the co‐evolutionary ventures, including unexpected users, uses, and implementations.

Originality/value

A complex venture conceptual model informs the architecting and systems engineering acquisition practices for this new solution category.

Details

VINE, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Bokolo Anthony Jnr, Sobah Abbas Petersen, Markus Helfert, Dirk Ahlers and John Krogstie

In smart cities pervasive systems are deployed by enterprises and stakeholders in municipalities to provide digital services to citizens. But cities are faced with the…

Abstract

Purpose

In smart cities pervasive systems are deployed by enterprises and stakeholders in municipalities to provide digital services to citizens. But cities are faced with the challenge of achieving system pluggability, mainly service integration due to numerous actors and systems needed for smart urban transformation. Hence, there is need to employ a comprehensive and holistic approach to help achieve service integration of pervasive platforms. Therefore, this study presents an Enterprise Architecture Framework (EAF) to support smart urban transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study the design science research methodology is adopted based on a multi-case studies of two organizations and data is collected using semi-structured interview from an organizations and municipality in Norway to validate how service integration can be achieved by the developed EAF to address pluggability challenges faced in urban environment.

Findings

Findings suggest that the presented EAF provides the structure to manage changes and maintain urban transformation and aims to align the business with the underlying information systems from the perspective of the stakeholders. Additionally, findings from the case studies modelled in ArchiMate language depict how service integration of different pervasive platforms provide digital services for smart urban transformation.

Research limitations/implications

This research only employed semi-structured interviews to validate service integration of digital platforms, other identified dimensions of pluggability were not fully addressed in this study.

Practical implications

Findings from the case studies provides insights on how pervasive platforms can be integrated to achieve a pluggable digital service from different stakeholders and data sources in practice. The developed EAF presented in this study provide a model that supports collection and exchange of data from different data sources in smart urban environment to enable the provision and consumption of digital services.

Social implications

The developed EAF aids system pluggability of actors and systems in providing digital service such as smart urban transformation that contributes to sustainable use of electric mobility in cities.

Originality/value

As cities increasingly deploy pervasive platforms to support urban innovation, researchers are seeking to explore how these platforms shape urban transformation. Presently, prior studies do not offer important insights into pervasive platform management from urban perspective. Against this backdrop, this study employs the information systems perspective of digital platforms literature roots in software development and physical product development to depict how the EAF can be employed to describe specific cases that integrate different pervasive platforms deployed by different stakeholders communicating to co-create collective digital services to citizens.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Duncan William Gibbons, Jean-Pierre Louis Serfontein and André Francois van der Merwe

The purpose of this paper is to identify and define the certification lifecycle of laser powder bed fusion for aerospace applications from equipment acquisition and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and define the certification lifecycle of laser powder bed fusion for aerospace applications from equipment acquisition and installation to production, part acceptance and continuous improvement activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A top–down systems engineering approach is performed consisting of concept development, requirements engineering and systems architecting. This approach is taken from the perspective of a production organization.

Findings

A certification roadmap is proposed that references industry requirements at the relevant phases of the roadmap. Each phase of the roadmap acts as a decision gate for progression to the next.

Originality/value

Qualification and certification of metal laser powder bed fusion is currently a challenge within the aerospace industry. From an aerospace point of view, the qualification and certification of this relatively new manufacturing process should not have to be any different from traditional manufacturing processes, although with extensive quality control and regulatory oversight. This paper proposes a means for fulfilling these requirements chronologically and provides guidance on ensuring such quality control throughout the manufacturing system lifecycle. This roadmap provides insight into the qualification and certification of laser powder bed fusion for aerospace applications and provides value for future industrial feasibility studies.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Christian Gärtner and Oliver Schön

The purpose of this paper is to explicate why and how modularization of business models can lead to path dependence or strategic flexibility, thus either inhibiting or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explicate why and how modularization of business models can lead to path dependence or strategic flexibility, thus either inhibiting or favoring business model innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual paper that depicts a model based on the extant literature. The derived implications for business model innovation are illustrated by several examples.

Findings

Modularity can be used as cognitive frame to explore issues of dynamics, evolution and transformation of business models. Thereby, the paper reveals drivers as well as barriers to business model innovation which sensitizes managers that modularity as a design principle is a two-edged sword: managers cannot simply rely on what they know about the benefits of modularity because this might lead to path dependence in the future.

Practical implications

The authors suggest that middle managers might best focus on managing modules and their direct relations. Senior management should put more emphasis on encouraging extra-modular thinking.

Originality/value

By outlining the concept of business model modularity, the authors add to the scarce literature that addresses modularity beyond the fields of products, production and organization design. The discussion also advances to the literature on drivers as well as barriers to managing business model innovation. While most of the extant literature has portrayed modularity as a means to increase flexibility, only a few studies have revealed the downside of modularity and explained how it gives rise to path dependence. In this respect, the authors highlight the relation between managerial action, self-reinforcing mechanisms and characteristics of the environment. Finally, the paper’s findings provide a lens to consider contradictory strategies simultaneously which is crucial for managing complex business models.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Fernando Menchini, Paschoal Tadeu Russo, Tiago Nascimento Borges Slavov and Rodrigo Paiva Souza

The purpose of this paper is to understand the association between the capacity to use enterprise architecture tools and the effectiveness of business model digitalization…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the association between the capacity to use enterprise architecture tools and the effectiveness of business model digitalization in companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two research strategies – survey and focus group – to analyze the relationship between maturity in using enterprise architecture (EA) and digital maturity, under the perspective of sociomateriality.

Findings

The use of EA is not a strategic competence that contributes to building sustainable competitive advantage, in the process of business model digitalization. On the other hand, top management’s determination and clarity, expressed by its sponsorship to communicating the strategy, contribute to the integration, engagement and adaptability of those involved and are responsible for higher maturity in the digitalization of business models.

Research limitations/implications

The statistical treatment used does not allow understanding the causality between the variables.

Practical implications

It provides executives with important elements for clarifying and operationalizing digital business models.

Originality/value

The study operationalizes a theoretical and measurement model, through a strategy that used simultaneously a survey and a focus group, which allowed to know associations between technological capacities and maturity in digital business models.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Jon Drabenstott, Wilson M. Stahl, James J. Michael, Rick Richmond, Gene Robinson and James E. Rush

Typically, library building projects are undertaken to accommodate a library's needs for the foreseeable twenty years or more. With major changes in information…

Abstract

Typically, library building projects are undertaken to accommodate a library's needs for the foreseeable twenty years or more. With major changes in information technologies occurring at intervals of less than five years, it should be assumed, within its twenty‐plus years of initial service, that a library building will have to accommodate a series of changes in order to support currently unknown technologies. Issues related to the development of library facilities that will meet current and future needs are discussed by three prominent consultants and representatives of two vendors: Wilson M. Stahl, James J. Michael (Data Research Associates), Rick Richmond, Gene Robinson (CLSI), and James E. Rush.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

Rising labour costs and skilled manpower shortages have given added impetus to automative developments. But in seeking to curb labour costs, the unwary manufacturer can…

Abstract

Rising labour costs and skilled manpower shortages have given added impetus to automative developments. But in seeking to curb labour costs, the unwary manufacturer can let himself in for even greater expense if he buys the wrong product for the job. That is why it is adviseable to call in outside help, as Geoffrey Evans, managing director of Warren Point systems consultancy, explains…….

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 75 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

H. James Harrington, Joseph J. Carr and Robert P. Reid

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

John McDonald and Valerie Léveillé

This article, which is one of the products of an international collaborative research initiative called iTrust, aims to explore these questions and offer suggestions…

Abstract

Purpose

This article, which is one of the products of an international collaborative research initiative called iTrust, aims to explore these questions and offer suggestions concerning how the issues they raise can be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes the results of the first stage in a multi-stage research project leading to methods for developing retention and disposition specifications and formal schedules for open data and big data initiatives. A fictitious organization is used to describe the characteristics of open data and big data initiatives, the gap between current approaches to setting retention and disposition specifications and schedules and what is required and how that gap can be closed. The landscape described as a result of this stage in the research will be tested in case studies established in the second stage of the project.

Findings

The argument is made that the business processes supporting open data and big data initiatives could serve as the basis for developing enhanced standards and procedures that are relevant to the characteristics of these two kinds of initiatives. The point is also made, however, that addressing the retention and disposition issues requires knowledge and leadership, both of which are in short supply in many organizations. The characteristics, the issues and the approaches will be tested through case studies and consultations with those involved with managing and administering big data and open data initiatives.

Originality/value

There is very little, if any, current literature that addresses the impact of big data and open data on the development and application of retention schedules. The outcome of the research will benefit those who are seeking to establish processes leading to formally approved retention and disposition specifications, as well as an instrument – the approved retention and disposal schedule – designed to ensure the ongoing integrity of the records and data associated with big data and open data initiatives.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Rick Barry

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's opinions on notable electronic records achievements over the past two decades in the USA and current issues and views on

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's opinions on notable electronic records achievements over the past two decades in the USA and current issues and views on the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an essay that is based on the author's 50 years in the field of information management, technology management, and records management as a researcher, manager, and consultant. It reviews different technologies used by the typically four generations of workers collaborating in the workplace at the same time, and what this portends for electronic recordkeeping.

Findings

Information managers, archivists, and records managers can gain insights into current and future issues managing electronic records by becoming good observers of changing technologies and their uses by generations soon to enter the workplace. Suggested options for addressing some of the more critical issues are offered, including approaches to technological designs for recordkeeping and a broader view of the potential for better integration of cultural information of all kinds in archives, libraries and museums, as a means of better serving researchers and society.

Originality/value

Evolving technologies and trends in their social usage have presented and will continue to present newer platforms for both personal and organizational work patterns, communications and record making. Modern information technologies and related analytical practices also offer opportunities for addressing some of the long‐standing issues encountered in planning and implementing electronic records systems in such an ever‐changing business world. Recent recordkeeping professionals can benefit from sharing experiences and stories in identifying and making use of such opportunities to move forward from a planning environment to an enterprise implementation environment.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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