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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2022

Cassandra Jane Fernandez, Rachana Ramesh and Anand Shankar Raja Manivannan

This research aims to study the students' perspectives on synchronous and asynchronous learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Both synchronous and asynchronous learning

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to study the students' perspectives on synchronous and asynchronous learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Both synchronous and asynchronous learning approaches used in online education have positive and negative outcomes. Hence, the aim is to study online education's positive and negative consequences, reflecting sync and async approaches. This research followed a mixed research approach. The key stakeholders of this research are the Indian educational institutions and students.

Design/methodology/approach

This research collected data from the students undergoing synchronous and asynchronous learning amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic. The data were collected (N = 655) from various students taking online classes during the pandemic. A questionnaire survey was distributed to the students through online platforms to collect the data. In this research, the authors have collected data using simple random sampling, and the same has been used for data analysis using SPSS version 26. The collected data were exposed to a factor analysis using a principal component analysis technique to reduce the vast dimensions.

Findings

The study findings show that synchronous learning is sometimes stressful, placing more responsibility on students mainly because of the increased screen time. At the same time, asynchronous learning allows the students to self-explore and research the topics assigned to them. Students also felt that asynchronous activities create a burden because of many written assignments to be submitted within a short period. Overall, the COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for the students and the teachers. However, teachers have helped students to learn through digital platforms. The majority of the respondents opined that technological disruptions and death in the family circle had been significant reasons for not concentrating during online classes. However, the combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning has led to a balanced education.

Practical implications

Higher education has undergone multiple transformations in a short period (from March 2020, 2021 and beyond). Educational institutions underwent a rapid transition in remote teaching and learning in the initial stages. As time progressed, educational institutions did course navigation where they relooked into their course plans, syllabus and brought a structural change to match the pandemic requirements. Meanwhile, educational institutions slowly equipped themselves with infrastructure facilities to bring academic integrity. At present, educational institutions are ready to face the new normality without disrupting services to society.

Social implications

Educational institutions create intellectual capital, which is important for the development of the economy. In the light of COVID-19, there are new methods and approaches newly introduced or old methods and approaches, which are reimplemented, and these approaches always work for the benefit of the student community.

Originality/value

The authors collected data during the COVID-19 pandemic; it helped capture the students' experience about synchronous and asynchronous learning. Students and faculty members are newly exposed to synchronous and asynchronous learning, and hence, it is essential to determine the outcome that will help many stakeholders.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Daniela Perbandt, Marie-Sophie Heinelt, Paula Bacelar-Nicolau, Mahsa Mapar and Sandra Sofia Caeiro

Distance universities are of great importance for establishing sustainability literacy, as they operate as multipliers for thousands of students. However, despite several…

Abstract

Purpose

Distance universities are of great importance for establishing sustainability literacy, as they operate as multipliers for thousands of students. However, despite several advantages of e-learning environments compared to traditional class-teaching, there are still challenges regarding suitable e-learning tools and didactical models. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of several e-learning tools on students’ knowledge and skills growth and to compare two learning paths, synchronous vs asynchronous, exploring how each affects the level of students’ knowledge achievement and skills acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on an online course “Participatory processes in environmental politics”. International MSc and PhD students who enrolled in the course were from FernUniversität in Hagen (Germany) and Aberta University (Portugal). The course was designed as the flipped classroom, applying different e-learning tools and activities, some synchronous and others asynchronous. A pre- and post-evaluation questionnaire was applied to evaluate students’ knowledge and skills. Descriptive statistical analyses were carried out on this data.

Findings

Results showed that in the synchronous group, knowledge about theoretical approaches to citizen participation and sustainable environmental governance improved to a greater extent, whereas the asynchronous group showed greater improvement in nearly all skills related to intercultural communication and e-learning. Also, in the synchronous path, students enhanced their knowledge on “research application” to a greater extent.

Originality/value

Evaluating the effectiveness of different e-learning tools on students’ sustainability knowledge and information and communication technologies skills is a fundamental issue. The study discusses these issues, contributing to enhancing the use of adequate and grounded e-learning models on sustainable development in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Carmen Taran

While synchronous and asynchronous distance education options have fulfilled the promise to reduce travel costs and decrease the number of human resources necessary for…

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Abstract

Purpose

While synchronous and asynchronous distance education options have fulfilled the promise to reduce travel costs and decrease the number of human resources necessary for training delivery, many corporations are faced with the need to produce learning even at a faster pace in order to gain and sustain competitive advantage. This means a paradigm shift in the distance education arena: in order to reduce the time to produce and deliver training, subject matter experts (SMEs) are asked to step up to the plate and assume additional roles in the instructional design process. This research addresses these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This research, conducted within the training department of a large telecommunications company, focuses on enabling SMEs to teach online, using synchronous instructional methods and a rapid e‐learning approach.

Findings

Based on student performance records and satisfaction survey results, it was concluded that SMEs are able to reduce training development time, deliver workshops online and maintain acceptable quality of instruction. SMEs' training background did not impact student achievement or satisfaction. Practical implications for corporate training development related to synchronous online training are also included.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper resides in the fact that the guidelines that emerged from this research are a step forward towards the expansion of rapid e‐learning as it applies to synchronous online training and to helping SMEs to teach online.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2022

Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

This article aims to explore student views from a UK higher educational institution about the concept of remote online higher educational delivery. Students were asked…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore student views from a UK higher educational institution about the concept of remote online higher educational delivery. Students were asked about opinions towards working remotely and the psychological impact this had upon students and students' studies. The research provided students with the opportunity to reflect upon whether the practice of delivering education remotely continues to provide students with a beneficial student learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a case study methodology utilising a mixed methods approach via questionnaire-based research. In total, 894 students completed the questionnaire. The aim of the research was to obtain a wide breadth of student opinion from multidisciplinary backgrounds to ascertain whether students' learning experience differed per subject area.

Findings

The research identified some interesting findings, namely that certain participants considered that learning remotely online was beneficial for instant feedback, supported motivation and fostered communities of practice. Negative perspectives related to feeling isolated, unmotivated and a preference towards face-to-face (F2F) delivery. One of the main areas of conflict identified from this study is that the aspect of engagement can impact students' online learning both positively and negatively.

Originality/value

The study provides an in-depth multidisciplinary student tertiary perspective relating to online remote learning. The findings from this study can be useful for educators to reflect upon and inform educational policy in relation to how best to facilitate and support the student learning experience off-campus.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Matthias Jahn, Claudia Piesche and Stefan Jablonski

Today's requirements concerning successful learning support comprise a variety of application scenarios. Therefore, the development of supporting software preferably aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Today's requirements concerning successful learning support comprise a variety of application scenarios. Therefore, the development of supporting software preferably aims at modular design. This article discusses requirements regarding flexibility of e‐learning systems and presents important principles, which should be met by successful systems. The purpose of this paper is to achieve a highly flexible system as follows: first of all, the system itself should be capable of easily being integrated into other systems. Second, the approach should allow easy integration of new components, respectively, existing resources without the need to adapt the whole system.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by the results of previous projects and by various experiences in online education the importance of modular structures of an effective architecture as well as for the system usage were discovered. Accordingly, existing e‐learning systems were examined and some deficiency regarding support of synchronous learning activities were found.

Findings

The architecture of the Meeting Room Platform (MRP) is introduced as an example implementation of synchronous communication and collaboration systems. In addition to fulfilling explained flexibility requirements, it is configurable in a way so that the user can choose a set of services he wants to provide in online meetings.

Originality/value

With aforementioned aspects of flexibility in mind, the concept of the MRP system differs from existing systems and constitutes a new approach in designing synchronous e‐learning environments. Finally, various use cases as described in this article show the benefit of this approach more detailed.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Ana Beatriz Hernández-Lara, Alexandre Perera-Lluna and Enric Serradell-López

With the growth of digital education, students increasingly interact in a variety of ways. The potential effects of these interactions on their learning process are not…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growth of digital education, students increasingly interact in a variety of ways. The potential effects of these interactions on their learning process are not fully understood and the outcomes may depend on the tool used. This study explores the communication patterns and learning effectiveness developed by students using two basic synchronous and asynchronous communication tools in e-learning environments, specifically business simulation games.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a quasi-experiment research with 478 online business students, 267 of whom used online discussion forums and 211 interacted via an instant messaging app. The application of learning analytics and text mining on natural language processing allows us to explore the student communication patterns with each of tools and their effectiveness in terms of learning.

Findings

The results confirm the complementarity of the communication tools, asynchronous tools being especially the suitable for task-related communication and synchronous ones for speeding up and facilitating student social interactions.

Originality/value

The main value of this research lies in the use of data analytics and text mining to access and analyse the content of student interactions to assess the learning process in greater depth, comparing synchronous and asynchronous learning modes, considering that little is known about the impact of online synchronous interaction or instant messaging, and even less about the different features, content and performance that emerge when these two learner interaction modalities are compared.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Bolanle A. Olaniran

The increased pressure to incorporate communication technologies into learning environments has intensified the attention given to the role of computer‐mediated…

993

Abstract

Purpose

The increased pressure to incorporate communication technologies into learning environments has intensified the attention given to the role of computer‐mediated communication (CMC) in academic settings. However, the issue of how and why these technologies, especially synchronous CMC applications, has been given less attention in pedagogical literature. This paper aims to address this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides issues for consideration in the deployment of synchronous CMC in educational settings.

Findings

Shows that there are differences in asynchronous and synchronous CMC with related issues of productivity of student learning and control.

Originality/value

This paper outlines advantages and disadvantages of using synchronous CMC in education while offering practical guides.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Paula Shaw and Sarah Rawlinson

The chapter discusses pedagogical models of digital learning in the United Kingdom with a focus on online and blended learning, rolled out as a case study in one…

Abstract

The chapter discusses pedagogical models of digital learning in the United Kingdom with a focus on online and blended learning, rolled out as a case study in one university. The chapter appraises the effectiveness of the model that implemented and foregrounded the evidence in the wider literature on models of digital learning in higher education. The chapter provides thematic analysis and methodological opportunities for the improvement of practice and presents a set of implementation implications and pitfalls to avoid for higher education institutions in Africa. Furthermore, a number of trends regarding the blending of learning and communication synchrony in digital learning have also been identified.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Higher Education in a Post-Covid World: New Approaches and Technologies for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-193-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Charlie C. Chen, Jiinpo Wu and Samuel C. Yang

This study investigates the impact of online synchronous audio and video systems on the performance of cooperative learning in decision making and intellective tasks.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the impact of online synchronous audio and video systems on the performance of cooperative learning in decision making and intellective tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 156 subjects, divided into 46 groups, were invited to resolve decision and intellective tasks in text messaging and audio conferencing e‐learning environments.

Findings

For decision‐making tasks, audio conferencing has a significant impact on cooperative learning satisfaction but not on learning performance; while for intellective tasks, neither audio conferencing nor text messaging has an impact on cooperative learning outcomes. There are no cross‐effects between platforms and task types on cooperative learning outcomes. The results indicate that the main effects of platforms and task types are independent. In other words, the impact of platforms on group discussion processes can be examined without the need of considering task types, since the latter will not affect the impacts of platforms.

Research limitations/implications

The main effects of information richness and task types are independent. Major limitation is that the student sample may not be sufficiently representative to allow wider generalization of the findings of this study.

Practical implications

The main effects of information richness and task types are independent as far as learning outcomes are concerned. The learners' attitude toward the synchronous learning system significantly affects the satisfaction of synchronous online cooperative learning.

Originality/value

This study uses empirical data to validate the hypothesized relationships between the independent variables of online synchronous learning systems (audio‐ and text‐based), the moderating variable of task types (decision making vs intellective) and the dependent variable of learning outcomes.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Ka Ling Cheung and Hao Wu

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought serious disruptions worldwide and higher education has been at the forefront of this global pandemic. To adapt to the “new normal”, new…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought serious disruptions worldwide and higher education has been at the forefront of this global pandemic. To adapt to the “new normal”, new technology-backed teaching mode emerges in universities as valued option to integrate face-to-face and remote teaching-learning activities. Blended synchronous learning (BSL) forms part of this new trial. This paper investigates the relevance and implications of BSL for university teaching and learning in the field of property and built environments in and beyond the transitional period of COVID disruptions and a time of global uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts case study approach to the understanding of BSL and its initial planning and design for property course delivery at the University of Melbourne. A review of literature helps formulate an analytical lens for the delivery mode and its significance and challenge in enhancing student learning experience. It also brings insights from the experience of participant observation.

Findings

This paper envisions new possibilities and challenges projecting the BSL as innovative and useful teaching-learning mode for property and built environments education in and beyond the pandemic. The analysis demonstrates the pedagogical values of BSL in facilitating supportive and equitable learning environment to achieve quality learning outcomes for property education. It identifies opportunities and challenges corresponding the underlying logic and practice of BSL.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine the use of BSL delivery and its pedagogical significance in post-pandemic property education. It sheds light on innovative pedagogical design for academic institutions to manage pandemic and technological disruptions to teaching-learning.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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