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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Syed Jalaluddin Haider

Discusses the two basic channels of book procurement ‐ the domestic market and imports (either directly or through local bookdealers). The former is the most popular…

Abstract

Discusses the two basic channels of book procurement ‐ the domestic market and imports (either directly or through local bookdealers). The former is the most popular method at present. Acquisition through this method is almost totally directed and controlled by availability of materials in the market, leaving only a limited choice for systematic collection building. Imports through the local bookdealer, favoured by special libraries in the mid‐1950s and 1960s, is no more employed owing to red‐tapism on the part of the dealer. The direct import system, which has proven beneficial in many respects for university libraries, has also gradually been given up. The reasons include: an uncertain import policy, import restrictions and trade embargoes against some countries because of political and ideological reasons, the fluctuating rate of the Pakistani rupee, hurdles in customs clearance, and, above all, the departure of competent personnel conversant with this kind of work to positions in OPEC countries.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Syed Jalaluddin Haider

Awareness of resource sharing in Pakistan in its present day form is a phenomenon of the 1980s. This is primarily attributed to problems encountered by libraries with…

Abstract

Awareness of resource sharing in Pakistan in its present day form is a phenomenon of the 1980s. This is primarily attributed to problems encountered by libraries with regard to the paucity of resources, lack of funds and absence of bibliographic and physical accessibility to limited resources. Projects directed towards resource sharing were planned and directed in the areas of business and economics (LABELNET), legislative information (Parliamentary Development Project) and agriculture (MART). But none could be implemented owing to the absence of proper planning, lack of competent human resources, non‐availability of standards, non‐existence of bibliographic apparatus and absence of leadership. Suggestions include: formation of a task force for development of standards; need for an active role on the part of the Pakistan Library Association and National Library of Pakistan for the development of awareness of computers in library operations to accelerate cooperative activities; and revision of the curriculum and improving the quality of library school faculty.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Syed Jalaluddin Haider

Surveying the growth of public libraries in Pakistan prior to and following independence, this paper shows that development has been at best a piecemeal affair and at…

Abstract

Surveying the growth of public libraries in Pakistan prior to and following independence, this paper shows that development has been at best a piecemeal affair and at worst non‐existent. Although some libraries seek to fulfil their goal of providing quality service to the public, most are hampered by overwhelming economic, social and educational problems. Notwithstanding this gloomy scenario, it is suggested that library planning based on awareness of indigenous needs and with realistic aims can achieve far more than has been the case in the past. Six factors are suggested as essential in any effective public library planning process in Pakistan; these may be valid in other developing countries as well.

Details

Asian Libraries, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1017-6748

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Syed Jalaluddin Haider and Khalid Mahmood

The aim of this study is to provide an insight to international readers into the perspective of doctoral level research in Pakistan. The factors which led to the start of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to provide an insight to international readers into the perspective of doctoral level research in Pakistan. The factors which led to the start of this program and difficulties encountered in this regard at different universities are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is mainly based on review of the literature. Research theses approved at MPhil and PhD level are evaluated. Some information collected from Library and Information Science (LIS) schools through personal communication is also provided.

Findings

The problems that did not allow success in the doctoral programs in LIS were: lack of encouragement by seniors in a real sense; low esteem for indigenous PhD degree in the eyes of fellow professionals; little or no impact of early recipients of the degree on profession; and non‐availability of financial assistance to the prospective candidates. Of the findings mention is made of: no fixed criteria for admission; the research topics do not concern the problems; and absence of proper supervision/guidance resulting in poor quality of thesis in most cases. Suggestions include: formation of a high level committee comprising senior library educators under the Higher Education Commission to work out problems and streamline the process; maintenance of close links with library schools in other countries, particularly in the English speaking world, which are interested in global librarianship.

Originality/value

This paper is the only evaluation of postmaster level LIS education in Pakistan. The findings are useful for planners of LIS education at postmaster level in Pakistan as well as in other developing countries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Khalid Mahmood, Abdul Hameed and Syed Jalaluddin Haider

The purpose of this study is to answer the following questions: what are an open system and its components? How can the open system model be used to describe a library…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to answer the following questions: what are an open system and its components? How can the open system model be used to describe a library system including its objectives and functions? What is the situation of librarianship in Pakistan in terms of the elements, characteristics and features of an open system model?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a review of the literature. The challenges which are faced by librarianship today are presented as a supra‐system of a library system. Inputs (people, knowledge, material, energy, capital and finance), processes, outputs and feedback mechanism of Pakistani librarianship are described. Characteristics of an open system such as users, controller, cycle of events, teleology, mission and negative entropy are presented with special reference to libraries in Pakistan.

Findings

That the Library system in Pakistan would benefit from the application of an open systems approach, but resource and other constraints prevent this from happening.

Research limitations/implications

Attempts to show how open systems theory can be applied to the sphere of a national library system.

Practical implications

The barriers to implementing the systems model offered in this paper are essentially practical: resource constraints, political priorities, and related social or governmental factors.

Originality/value

The paper is useful not only to understand how a library can be studied using systems theory but also to have a picture of the present state of librarianship in Pakistan.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Khalid Mahmood, Abdul Hameed and Syed Jalaluddin Haider

To survey fundraising activities of government sector libraries in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

To survey fundraising activities of government sector libraries in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey of randomly selected 100 large university, college, public and special libraries of Pakistan is conducted.

Findings

The review of literature reveals that no formal survey of such activities was carried out before. However, general library literature in the country mentions the examples of donations and gifts received in libraries. Data collected through survey show that very few libraries are involved in fundraising activities. Significant donations are given by foundations, international agencies and some individuals. The reasons for non‐engagement of most of the libraries in such activities are shortage of staff and parent organizations' involvement through other offices. Most of the libraries have no future plans for fundraising.

Research limitations/implications

The survey only focuses on large libraries in the public sector. Small libraries, school libraries and private sector libraries are not covered.

Practical implications

This is the first paper on this topic in Pakistan. It will help LIS decision makers plan for fundraising activities in libraries.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive literature review on fundraising in Pakistan. It is the first survey of such activities in this country. The experiences shared by libraries can be helpful for other developing countries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 26 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Khalid Mahmood, Abdul Hameed and Syed Jalaluddin Haider

To identify which library services could be provided on a fee‐based model in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

To identify which library services could be provided on a fee‐based model in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveying experts in Pakistani libraries, a questionnaire was administered to determine both the types of library services that could generate revenue and the viability of charging for library services.

Findings

Out of 32 identified information services, 12 were identified as excellent candidates for the fee‐based model. Another 16 were identified as having a better than 50 percent chance of success.

Originality/value

Identifies a minimum of 28 library services that may generate funds for Pakistani libraries if they are changed to a fee‐based model.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Abstract

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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