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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Fauzia Syed, Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Muhammad Kashif, Muhammad Asrar-ul-Haq, Qurt ul ain, Mudassir Husnain and Muhammad Kashif Aslam

This study investigates despotic leadership (DL) as an antecedent to bullying behavior with a mediating role of moral emotions at work. Another aim is to study the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates despotic leadership (DL) as an antecedent to bullying behavior with a mediating role of moral emotions at work. Another aim is to study the moderating role of self-concordance to buffer the relationship between DL and arousal of moral emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected two-source (self-reported and supervisor reported) time-lagged data in the shape of a three-wave survey (i.e. one month time interval for each time) from 242 dyads in the health sector of Pakistan.

Findings

The results revealed that moral emotions mediated the relationship between DL and bullying behavior. Furthermore, self-concordance moderates the relationship between DL and moral emotions, such that the relationship will be stronger in the case of low self-concordance.

Research limitations/implications

Managers need to promote a culture that accommodates diversity of opinion at the organization so that everyone is able to express and share their views openly. Organizations should encourage supervisors to participate in leadership development programs aimed at eliminating DL.

Originality/value

This study establishes the role of self-concordance and moral emotions in the relationship between despotic leadership DL and bullying behavior.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Syed Shaan Abbas and Muhammad Akhtar

The paper has the following learning outcomes: to understand the historical and geographical aspect of Pakistan vis-à-vis other countries of South East Asia and the world;…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The paper has the following learning outcomes: to understand the historical and geographical aspect of Pakistan vis-à-vis other countries of South East Asia and the world; to be able to understand the different marketing strategies of the tourism company; to gather the knowledge of many unknown facts which remain out of sight and hardly surface; to boost economy if its facts and figures are given due weight age and followed with true letter and spirit; and to give a big boost to an industry which remains mostly dormant for many decades. The ratio analysis of service sector is explained. How finances can be arranged in shortest time and generates profitability for the company is also discussed.

Case overview/synopsis

The study provides an overview on the following topics: lack of interest by the Government in promotion; training of tour operators and guide; and managing the expected income from this industry. This study makes the masses aware that how much potential exist in the field of tourism in Pakistan. How the tour operators find huge potential in all segments of tourism and how the big force of trained manpower can be formed and creates employment. Service sector mostly run on equity finances because of lack of collateral, how efficiently they manage the finance for the business year. It gives details of extensive marketing strategy, the huge profit margin in foreign currency and cost volume profit systems of tourism companies.

Complexity academic level

BBA, MBA and MS.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Doreen S.K. Tan and Syed Akhtar

This study examined the relationships of normative and affective facets of organizational commitment with experienced burnout within the framework of the Confucian‐based…

Abstract

This study examined the relationships of normative and affective facets of organizational commitment with experienced burnout within the framework of the Confucian‐based Chinese culture. Data for this exploratory work were collected through a questionnaire survey of 147 employees of a Chinese‐owned bank in Hong Kong. The questionnaire consisted of scales on experienced burnout, organizational commitment, and work perceptions. Results showed that the mean score for normative commitment was significantly higher than the mean score for affective commitment. Regression analysis indicated that when age, tenure, organizational level, and work perceptions were controlled, normative commitment had a significant positive effect on experienced burnout, whereas affective commitment had no significant impact. Results are interpreted in the context of a Confucian‐based Chinese managerial ideology and implications are drawn for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2021

Muzhar Javed, Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Khalid Hussain, Muhammad Junaid and Fauzia Syed

Drawing on stakeholder theory, this study examines the relationship between responsible leadership and its macro-, meso- and micro-level outcomes. Further, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on stakeholder theory, this study examines the relationship between responsible leadership and its macro-, meso- and micro-level outcomes. Further, this study investigates the moderating role of authenticity on the relationship between responsible leadership and its multi-level effects, i.e. relational social capital, corporate social performance and community citizenship behaviour among employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted four field studies using the quantitative methodology to test the hypotheses. In study 1 (N = 236), by adopting a multi-wave and multi-source research design, the authors examine the relationship between responsible leadership, authenticity and relational social capital. In study 2 (N = 203), by adopting a multi-wave research design, the authors examine the relationship between responsible leadership, authenticity and corporate social performance. In study 3 (N = 203), by adopting a multi-wave and multi-source research design, the authors examine the relationship between responsible leadership, authenticity and employees' community citizenship behaviour. In study 4 (N = 257), by adopting a multi-wave and multi-source research design, the authors capture the impact of responsible leadership on outcomes (social capital, corporate social performance and community citizenship behaviour) with a boundary condition of authenticity.

Findings

The authors find that responsible leadership enhances relational social capital, improves a firm's social performance and develops community citizenship behaviour among employees. Further, the study finds that authenticity positively moderates the relationship between responsible leadership and its multi-level outcomes.

Originality/value

First, it is a maiden study to investigate the multi-level outcomes of RL in a series of three empirical studies. Second, it contributes to RL literature by testing a unique moderating role of authenticity between RL and its multi-level outcomes of relational social capital, corporate social performance and employees' community citizenship behaviour. This study also provides empirical evidence for the multi-level implications of stakeholder theory.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Muzhar Javed, Fauzia Syed, Muhammad Kashif Aslam and Khalid Hussain

Drawing on the role theory, this study examines how responsible leadership invokes whistleblowing intentions in employees by intervening through “trust in leader” and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the role theory, this study examines how responsible leadership invokes whistleblowing intentions in employees by intervening through “trust in leader” and “person-organization fit.”

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Hayes (2013) approach, the authors tested the model by collecting a multi-wave data from banking sector employees.

Findings

Results of the study show that responsible leadership kindles whistleblowing intentions in banks' employees. Further, the results reveal that both “trust in leader” and “person-organization fit” individually mediate the relationship between responsible leadership and whistleblowing intentions. Moreover, we found that the relationship between responsible leadership and whistleblowing intentions is serially mediated through “trust in leader” and “person-organization fit.”

Originality/value

The current study contributes to whistleblowing intentions and responsible leadership literature by suggesting “trust in leader” and “person-organization fit” as process through which responsible leaders kindle employee's outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Fauzia Syed, Muzhar Javed and Mudassir Husnain

This study, based on the moderated-mediation model, investigates the indirect effect of facades of conformity in the relationship between supervisor ostracism and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, based on the moderated-mediation model, investigates the indirect effect of facades of conformity in the relationship between supervisor ostracism and unethical work behaviour. Furthermore, this study tested the moderating role of perceived organizational obstruction in the aforementioned relationship through facades of conformity.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a multi-wave and two-source data from employees and peers (n = 264) of the services sector in Pakistan, the authors tested the proposed framework using Hayes and Preacher moderated-mediation technique.

Findings

The findings reflect that supervisor ostracism encourages unethical behaviour at the workplace. Further, results revealed that facades of conformity mediated this direct relationship. Moreover, the authors found that perceived organizational obstruction moderated the relationship between supervisor ostracism and facades of conformity. Results also confirm that perceived organizational obstruction moderates the mediated relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes with a discussion, managerial implications, limitations and directions for future research.

Originality/value

This study added value in the literature of supervisor ostracism, facades of conformity, unethical work behaviour and perceived organizational obstruction.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Dail Fields, Andrew Chan, Syed Akhtar and Terry C. Blum

To compare the tendency of US and Hong Kong Chinese companies to utilize three alternative human resource management (HRM) strategies to offset uncertainties in the supply…

Abstract

Purpose

To compare the tendency of US and Hong Kong Chinese companies to utilize three alternative human resource management (HRM) strategies to offset uncertainties in the supply of labor.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 158 US and 66 Hong Kong Chinese companies concerning the extent to which these companies engaged in training and development, monitoring and assessment of employee performance, and staffing through an internal labor market. Data were also obtained concerning the uncertainty in the supply of qualified employees.

Findings

After controlling differences in industries and company size, the results show that, when faced with labor uncertainty, use of the three (HRM) strategies was increased by Hong Kong Chinese companies, but decreased by US companies.

Practical implications

This study provides new information about how cultural differences may play out in business organizations. The results may provide some insight into how competitors in a global marketplace may react to environmental uncertainties and greater resource dependence.

Originality/value

This study fills a need to understand how organizations operating different cultural contexts differ in their reactions to uncertainties in the business environment.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Xiaowen Tian and Shuanglin Lin

Using panel data of 11324 firms in China from 1996 to 1999, the study finds that FDI tends to generate positive technology spillovers to domestic firms within the same…

Abstract

Using panel data of 11324 firms in China from 1996 to 1999, the study finds that FDI tends to generate positive technology spillovers to domestic firms within the same industry, but adversely affect productivity of domestic firms in other industries. It is also found that both the positive and the adverse effects are more significant at the local than the national level. Evidence from China thus suggests that FDI technology spillovers are in favor of domestic firms within the same industry rather than domestic firms in other industries, and are most likely to affect domestic firms within the same locality. The finding has significant implications for the study of the interaction between MNEs and local firms in emerging markets.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Dirk De Clercq, Tasneem Fatima and Sadia Jahanzeb

This study seeks to unpack the relationship between employees' exposure to workplace bullying and their turnover intentions, with a particular focus on the possible…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to unpack the relationship between employees' exposure to workplace bullying and their turnover intentions, with a particular focus on the possible mediating role of perceived organizational politics and moderating role of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested with multi-source, multi-wave data collected from employees and their peers in various organizations.

Findings

Workplace bullying spurs turnover intentions because employees believe they operate in strongly politicized organizational environments. This mediating role of perceived organizational politics is mitigated to the extent that employees can draw from their creative skills though.

Practical implications

For managers, this study pinpoints a critical reason – employees perceive that they operate in an organizational climate that endorses dysfunctional politics – by which bullying behaviors stimulate desires to leave the organization. It also reveals how this process might be contained by spurring employees' creativity.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into the process that underlies the connection between workplace bullying and quitting intentions by revealing the hitherto overlooked roles of employees' beliefs about dysfunctional politics and their own creativity levels.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2021

Belal Albashiti, Zeeshan Hamid and Mohammed Aboramadan

Building on conservation of resources theory and unfolding theory of turnover, this paper aims to propose a model of the effects of despotic leadership on employees’ job…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on conservation of resources theory and unfolding theory of turnover, this paper aims to propose a model of the effects of despotic leadership on employees’ job satisfaction and turnover intention in the hospitality industry. In this model, the authors theorize psychological distress to play an intervening role among the aforesaid linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in three-waves from 212 employees working in Palestinian restaurants. A covariance-based matrix in structural equation modeling was used to verify the proposed linkages in the study. A marker variable was used to control the common method bias.

Findings

The results showed that despotic leadership has a direct negative effect on job satisfaction and a positive indirect effect on turnover intentions. Besides, psychological distress showed to play significant mediating effects among the aforementioned relationships.

Practical implications

This study gives insights to the hospitality industry on how despotic leadership can be destructive and lead to negative consequences.

Originality/value

This study is unique, as it is the first study conducted on despotic leadership in a hospitality setting. The study responded to scholarly calls made to enrich the literature pertaining to despotic leadership and its outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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