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Open Access

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of lived experience research in peer work.

Design/methodology/approach

A suite of user-friendly and engaging lived experience research resources was introduced to consumers by peer workers. In-depth interviews were conducted with 33 consumer participants and five peer workers about their experiences. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The role of the peer workers appeared critical in ensuring that participants, despite their varied needs, preferences and backgrounds, derived optimum benefit from each resource. Features in resource delivery that promoted a positive experience included presenting the resources in the context of an existing relationship, providing clear explanations, going through resources together, encouraging reflection, taking enough time; and flexible delivery. Peer workers viewed the resources as potentially useful in their everyday peer work and as a valuable addition to their peer work toolkit.

Practical implications

The benefit of lived experience research to consumers is likely to be optimised by supportive and thoughtful delivery of the resources. Peer workers have the skills and are in an ideal position to do this. Bringing lived experience research to consumers provides peer workers with a potentially unique and helpful approach for supporting and promoting recovery and is congruent with their overall practice.

Originality/value

Lived experience research has the potential to benefit consumers directly but is rarely brought to their attention. This paper is the first to examine the potential role of peer workers in introducing learnings from lived experience research to consumers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Rosemary Overell

In this chapter, the author considers how Melbourne’s grindcore metal scene produces itself as coherent, authentic and masculine through the discursive positioning of…

Abstract

In this chapter, the author considers how Melbourne’s grindcore metal scene produces itself as coherent, authentic and masculine through the discursive positioning of Sydney’s scene as lacking, inauthentic and feminine and/or homosexual. The way Melbourne scene-members talk about Sydney in ethnographic interviews and online, indicates how Melbourne’s grindcore scene identity rests on a particular striving towards – and fantasy of – a bounded, comprehensible masculine identity anchored in Symbolic/linguistic signifiers of homophobia. Building on my previous research on Melbourne’s scene, the author utilises a Lacanian perspective to argue that the masculinist talk of Melbournians works as a response to the affective experience of enjoying grindcore music. Here, the author departs from my earlier work, where the author used Deleuzian/Massumian understandings of affect to suggest that affect works to construct community belonging in grindcore scenes (2014). Instead, the author uses Lacan’s approach to affect to suggest that Melbourne grindcore fans construct their identity via furiously producing a fantasy of Sydney fans as ‘Other’. They Symbolically construct Sydney as a ‘cultural wasteland’ populated by ‘poofter[s]’ (Melbourne Grind Syndicate, 2016) who are imagined, and positioned as, inauthentic due to their affective enthusiasm for grindcore. Here, affect works to exclude and Other grindcore fans rather than as a force for collectivity.

Details

Australian Metal Music: Identities, Scenes, and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-167-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2014

Stephen Ison, Corinne Mulley, Anthony Mifsud and Chinh Ho

This chapter provides a case study of the implementation of the Parking Space Levy (PSL) in Sydney, Australia. Introduced by the Parking Space Levy Act 1992, the scheme…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a case study of the implementation of the Parking Space Levy (PSL) in Sydney, Australia. Introduced by the Parking Space Levy Act 1992, the scheme places a levy on business use of off-street car parking spaces with the revenues from the levy being hypothecated to public transport improvements. The chapter outlines the implementation of what is now a relatively mature scheme and examines how the revenues raised by the scheme have been spent.

Methodology/approach

This chapter offers a review of the introduction of the levy in Sydney and explores its impact in implementation with respect to changes to the number of parking spaces and an analysis of the way in which the hypothecated revenue has been spent. The implementation of the PSL is evaluated against the literature on hypothecation of funds and includes a discussion of policy issues for Sydney in the light of the evidence presented.

Findings

Whilst off-street parking availability is a major contributor to peak period traffic, the implementation of the PSL as a single rate of application has not led to a decrease in total number of available parking places in the City of Sydney. The number of concessions for unused spaces, whereby the levy was not imposed, increased when the levy rate was doubled in 2009 although this was accompanied by a fall in the number of exemptions from the levy. The revenue from the PSL has been dedicated to improvements in public transport infrastructure, primarily interchanges and commuter car parks although the more recent provisions to spend on ‘soft’ measures to improve sustainable travel have not been taken up.

Practical implications

Whilst a stated objective of the PSL was to reduce congestion, the chapter concludes that the PSL had more than this single objective which makes it more difficult to assess whether its implementation has been a success.

Originality/value of chapter

This chapter provides an overview of the introduction, implementation and outcomes of the PSL in Sydney, relating it to the PSL in Melbourne (Chapter 13) and the WPL in Nottingham (Chapter 15). No other study to date evaluated the PSL in Sydney against the literature relating to hypothecation nor tracked the impacts of implementation of the PSL to evaluate its success.

Details

Parking Issues and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-919-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Koorosh Gharehbaghi, Kerry McManus, Maged Georgy, Ken Farnes, Francesca Pagliara and Matt Myers

Through the significance matrix, this paper aims to investigate and explore the main sustainability factors of mega transportation infrastructure projects. Sydney’s Metro…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the significance matrix, this paper aims to investigate and explore the main sustainability factors of mega transportation infrastructure projects. Sydney’s Metro mega transportation infrastructure is used as a case study. Sydney’s Metro was selected because of its sustainability challenges faced because of the areas’ diverse ecological zones. Sydney’s Metro is thus examined as the basis of best practice for the determination of the sustainability factors of transportation infrastructures.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the significance matrix as a methodology, this research evaluates the environmental impact assessment and environmental assessment processes, to alleviate the problems of the mega transportation infrastructure.

Findings

This research found that a more comprehensive determination is needed to further analyse the sustainability factors of mega transportation infrastructures, use of a significance matrix would further assess the environmental complexities of mega transportation infrastructures and the sustainability factors of mega transportation infrastructures should include a nonlinear and asymmetrical scheme highlighting its components and carefully outlining its integration and consolidation.

Originality/value

Although there is concurrent research into sustainability factors of mega transportation, this paper undertakes a new methodology for such infrastructure. While the significance matrix is not a new concept, it has never been used specifically for mega transportation infrastructure. Subsequently, using the significance matrix as a methodology, this research undertakes such environmental analysis and assessment and thus produces a qualitative risk analysis matrix. The findings from this research will ultimately assist the key stakeholders of mega transportation infrastructures to better plan, monitor and support similar projects.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Terence Y.M. Lam and Calvin Chen

Higher education is now one of the biggest export sectors in the Australian economy. Purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) has emerged as a new asset class in…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education is now one of the biggest export sectors in the Australian economy. Purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) has emerged as a new asset class in Australia, as demanded by international and domestic students. As of 25 October 2020, there were still approximately 400,000 onshore international students and 135,000 offshore students despite the COVID pandemic. Various universities remain optimistic about their returns to Australia. Active PBSA investors remain focussed on the longer-term fundamentals and return of the Australian student market. This study aims to examine the investment potential of the PBSA sector in Sydney.

Design/methodology/approach

The triangulation method was used to confirm whether the literature findings on the high potential of PBSA investment apply to the context of the Sydney market. Qualitative expert interviews with two directors of major international real estate consulting firms, one private family trust investor and one director of a development company, were conducted in tandem with a qualitative multiple-case study of three major PBSAs via interviews with their building managers. These selected participants broadly covered the stakeholder settings across the industry.

Findings

A positive and solid trend of demand and rental growth was confirmed by the expert interviews and the performance of PBSA cases in Sydney, as supported by the growing number of international students in the longer term. To enhance the rental growth, and hence total returns, self-contained studio-type accommodation with quality facilities and social support should be provided, and operators should consistently track the needs of students and provide them with a better living experience.

Research limitations/implications

PBSA is a new asset class and there have been limited supply and sale transactions to enable detailed examination of the capital growth, so this research has focussed on rental growth. When the PBSA market becomes more mature, further research should be conducted to analyse the strength of this emerging investment’s capital growth and total returns.

Practical implications

In the longer term, PBSA is a low-risk property investment with potentially high returns in Sydney. Institutional investors and real estate consultants can make informed decisions to build up the property portfolio. PBSA is capital-intensive and has low liquidity, so this type of investment is particularly suitable for institutional investors.

Social implications

Universities should provide more suitable PBSA accommodations by themselves or partnerships with private developers. Planning authorities should include more PBSA residential uses in the land zoning plan. This is to provide more affordable accommodations to meet the demand of cost-sensitive students.

Originality/value

This research confirms PBSA is a low-risk investment with potentially high returns within the context of the Sydney market. The findings will benefit the major stakeholders of PBSA in their investment decisions, including investors, developers and universities.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2021

Linda Corkery, Paul Osmond and Peter Williams

This paper aims to examine the planning policy and legal framework governing the creation and operation of urban agriculture in Sydney, Australia’s global city. All levels…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the planning policy and legal framework governing the creation and operation of urban agriculture in Sydney, Australia’s global city. All levels of urban agriculture are considered – from domestic and small community gardens to large agribusiness – as all make an important contribution to agricultural production in an urban context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Australian State of New South Wales and its capital Sydney, as a focus, the study examines the recent trend of the recognition and re-establishment of agriculture as a desired land use in cities. Three examples are selected for closer scrutiny – Horsley Park Urban Agriculture Precinct, located in the Western Sydney Parklands; City of Sydney’s City Farm, located in the inner suburb of St Peters; and the Western Sydney Aerotropolis Agribusiness Precinct, located at a new airport on the fringe of Sydney.

Findings

As more city-dwellers embrace urban food production and as city authorities seek to encourage and facilitate farming activities, it is clear that regulatory structures which allow it to happen should be incorporated into urban planning legislation at (in the Australian context) state government level. If cities want to encourage urban agriculture, planning legislation needs to be part of the broader legal framework for enabling it to germinate and thrive.

Originality/value

This paper explores the emergence of two new types of urban agriculture: first, the multi-functional, small-scale urban farming operation, situated conceptually between a community garden and a full-scale commercial agricultural enterprise, and located spatially in the midst of built-up urban form; and second, the intensive, high tech export-oriented model exemplified by the Aerotropolis Agribusiness Precinct.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Md Abdullah Al-Masum and Chyi Lin Lee

Housing prices in Sydney have increased rapidly in the past three decades. This leads to a debate of whether Sydney housing prices have departed from macroeconomic…

Abstract

Purpose

Housing prices in Sydney have increased rapidly in the past three decades. This leads to a debate of whether Sydney housing prices have departed from macroeconomic fundamentals. However, little research has been devoted to this area. Therefore, this study aims to fill this gap by examining the long-run association between housing prices and market fundamentals. Further, it also examines the long-run determinants of housing prices in Greater Sydney.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of this study involves two stages. The first stage is to estimate the presence of long-run relationship between housing prices and market fundamentals with the Johansen and Juselius Cointegration test. Thereafter, the determinants of housing prices in Greater Sydney is assessed by using a vector error correction model.

Findings

The empirical results show that Sydney housing prices are cointegrated with market fundamentals in the long run. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that market fundamentals such as gross disposable income, housing supply, unemployment rate and gross domestic product are the key long-run determinants of Sydney housing prices, reflecting that Sydney housing prices, in general, can be explained by market fundamentals in the long run.

Research limitations/implications

The findings enable more informed and practical policy and investment decision-making regarding the relation between housing prices and market fundamentals.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study to offer empirical evidence of the degree to which the behaviour of housing prices can be explained by market fundamentals, from a capital city instead of at a national level, using a relatively disaggregated dataset of housing price series for Greater Sydney.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Matthew Egan

The purpose of this paper is to explain three phases of modernisation change in the Sydney water sector from the early 1980s to 2007 and comments on how those phases of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain three phases of modernisation change in the Sydney water sector from the early 1980s to 2007 and comments on how those phases of change are likely to be impacting the nascent development of water management processes in Sydney‐based water consuming organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework of modernisation reform in the Sydney water sector has been determined through literature review.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that only moderate modernisation reform occurred in the Sydney water sector in the period from the early 1980s to 2007 tempered by water scarcity and a thrust to sustainability. As a result of these reforms, it is argued that water management processes in water consuming organisations are likely to have accelerated into the early 2000s.

Research limitations/implications

This paper calls for empirical research to understand why organisations in the Sydney region have recently developed water management practices.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to an understanding of the impact of modernisation reform in the Sydney water sector from the early 1980s to 2007 and provides insight into the factors driving water management practices in water consuming organisations.

Originality/value

This paper provides public sector and environmental management researchers with an examination of modernisation reform in the Sydney water sector and relates this to the development of water management objectives in water consuming organisations.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Mark Hutchinson

The purpose of this paper is to trace debates between state and federal governments, and community stakeholders, leading to the establishment and abolition of the first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace debates between state and federal governments, and community stakeholders, leading to the establishment and abolition of the first attempt at a university for Western Sydney, established as Chifley University Interim Council.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical analysis draws from published papers, oral history accounts, and original documents in archives of the University of Sydney and the University of Western Sydney.

Findings

Higher education reform in the 1980s in Australia was fought out as an extension of broader issues such as “States rights”, the rising political power of peri‐urban regions, long‐standing tensions between state and Commonwealth bureaucracies, and the vested interests of existing tertiary education and community groups.

Originality/value

This is the only existing study of attempts to found Chifley University, and one of the few available studies which take a social and contextual approach to understanding the critical reforms of the 1980s leading up to the Dawkins Reforms of 1988‐1990.

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Renate E. Meyer, Martin Kornberger and and Markus A. Höllerer

In this chapter, the authors introduce Ludwik Fleck and his ideas of “thought style” and “thought collective” to suggest a re-thinking of the divide between “micro” and…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors introduce Ludwik Fleck and his ideas of “thought style” and “thought collective” to suggest a re-thinking of the divide between “micro” and “macro” that has perhaps more inhibited than inspired organization studies in general, and institutional theory in particular. With Fleck, the authors argue that there is no such thing as thought style-neutral cognition or undirected perception: meaning, constituted through a specific thought style shared by a thought collective, permeates cognition, judgment, perception, and thought. The authors illustrate our argument with the longitudinal case study of Sydney 2030 (i.e., the strategy-making process of the City of Sydney, Australia). The case suggests that – regardless of its actual implementation – a strategy is successful to the extent to which it shapes the socio-cognitive infrastructure of a collective and enables those engaged in city-making to think and act collectively.

Details

Macrofoundations: Exploring the Institutionally Situated Nature of Activity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-160-5

Keywords

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