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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Lay Hong Tan, Boon Cheong Chew and Syaiful Rizal Hamid

This paper adopts an existing body of theory (gaps model of service quality) and aims to further contribute to it. The theory building within this paper is expected to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper adopts an existing body of theory (gaps model of service quality) and aims to further contribute to it. The theory building within this paper is expected to represent an extension to the existing theory, particularly with regard to the reconceptualisation and redefinition of service quality in sustainable banking.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was based on primary data collected through a series of qualitative interviews with the 35 bankers who were from different departments. In addition, available secondary data such as academic books and journals, government and regulatory authority’s publications, website publications, Maybank’s annual reports and sustainability reports were reviewed to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the Maybank’s sustainability banking operating system.

Findings

This paper has documented various findings identified with the aspects of sustainable banking in Maybank. Essentially, these findings are focussed on filling the gaps that currently exist in the literature and in the practice of sustainable banking in Maybank. Maybank is in the phase of preventive banking because, in recent years, it has been observed that Maybank is moving towards the initiative to embrace sustainability in their banking operations. Maybank has used the sustainability criteria for the credit risk management process and socially responsible investing. When viewed from this perspective, it is possible to say that a transition process has started towards offensive banking. In addition, this research’s findings imply that the determination of the service quality level of customers focusses not only on the homogenous customer’s quality evaluation, but it also includes the examination of heterogeneous customers. Heterogeneous customers are those who have an indirect interest in the bank; they are indirectly affected either positively or negatively by the actions of the bank.

Research limitations/implications

The reconceptualisation and redefinition of service quality, which embeds the novel concept of sustainable banking, can be attributed to a handful of distinctive financial institutions which have been proactively and gradually shaping their corporate images as advocates of socio-environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

The limited literature on sustainable banks and to the best knowledge of the researchers, no other researcher has examined sustainable banking in the Malaysian banking industry to date. This study is designed to address this gap with the central objective to investigate the aspect of sustainable banking operating system provided by Maybank by using the gap model of service quality which was developed by Parasuraman et al. (1985).

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Lay Hong Tan, Boon Cheong Chew and Syaiful Rizal Hamid

This paper aims to provide a more holistic perspective on rationales that motivated Maybank to move toward a sustainable banking operating system.

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1932

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a more holistic perspective on rationales that motivated Maybank to move toward a sustainable banking operating system.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was based on primary data collected through a series of qualitative interview with 35 bankers who were from different departments. Besides, the secondary data such as academic books and journals, government and regulatory authority’s publications, website publications, Maybank’s annual reports and Maybank’s sustainability reports were reviewed to obtain a more comprehensive understanding on rationales that motivated Maybank to move toward a sustainable banking operating system.

Findings

Within the corporation studied, the rationales for moving Maybank toward sustainable banking operating system are driven by macro-, meso- and micro-level drivers. In terms of macro-level drivers, the pressures come from the bank’s external environment. A PESTLE analysis is used to discuss the drivers for change present within the macro environment. The different national government bodies and non-government organizations are calling upon financial institutions to implement more socially and environmentally friendly lending policies. In terms of meso-level drivers, stakeholders are viewed as important driving forces for Maybank to integrate sustainability into banking operations. Internal driving forces are likely to emanate from employees, the board of directors and shareholders. External driving forces result from pressure from customers, governments, competitors, NGOs and society at large. Micro-level drivers are drivers of sustainable banking that include pressures generated from within the bank’s internal environment. Maybank is largely motivated by its mission statement and vision statement, which is articulated in their sustainable banking agenda.

Research limitations/implications

Viewing the rationales that motivated Maybank to move toward a sustainable banking operating system through multiple perspectives – macro-, meso- and micro-level drivers present an interesting approach for research.

Originality/value

The rationales for moving Maybank toward a sustainable banking operating system are driven by macro-, meso- and micro-level drivers. This paper provides fresh insight into rationales that move toward the sustainable banking operating system.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Boon Cheong Chew, Lay Hong Tan and Syaiful Rizal Hamid

The main purposes of the study were to investigate the ethical banking operations based on the award-winning the UK Co-operative Bank which has successfully brought…

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2776

Abstract

Purpose

The main purposes of the study were to investigate the ethical banking operations based on the award-winning the UK Co-operative Bank which has successfully brought significant implications on sustaining the nation’s (the UK) socioenvironmental development. The Co-operative Bank operations are conceptualised into a solid ethical banking operations framework (EBOF) to contribute theoretically into enriching the body of the knowledge. Besides, by understanding the EBOF of an ethical banking system, the other banking players like the Malaysian bank can learn from this best practice and gradually shape its operation to become more ethical.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study on the UK Co-operative Bank was based on primary data collected through a series of qualitative focus group conducted on 20 senior bank managers who were interested and were supportive of this research project. These experienced respondents are actively involved in the Co-operative Bank’s “Corporate Ethical Policy” formulation, as well as the implementation of this policy into the Co-operative Bank’s daily operations. Besides, secondary data are reviewed to obtain a more comprehensive understanding on the Co-operative Bank. The research began in December 2012 and was completed in August 2014. The main reason the researchers opted for qualitative studies is to comply with the criteria of inductive approach, whereby the final outcomes (EBOF) include the crystallisation of the ethical banking operations, which could be generalised theoretically and empirically.

Findings

At the end of the study, EBOF based on the Co-operative Bank’s ethical operations (as the case studied) is constructed. As a conclusion, the Co-operative Bank has done tremendously well in sustaining the UK’s socioenvironmental development, which justifies the reason why the Co-operative Bank has won numerous prestigious awards and is being well recognised nationally and regionally.

Practical implications

The novelty concept of ethical banking is driven by the global socioenvironmental initiative that influences some of the major financial institutions which are proactively and gradually shaping their corporate image in safeguarding the community around the environment. This research has successfully attained the ultimate objective to foster knowledge transfer through learning from the best (from the UK Co-operative Bank) in shaping local (Malaysia) ethical banking.

Originality/value

This study constructs the EBOF based on the Co-operative Bank’s ethical operations that could be empirically disseminated and adopted in other banks’ operations (across the globe). This is aimed in shaping the local banking industry to become more ethical (learning from the best practice of the UK Co-operative Bank) in wealth creation that places high emphasis on socioenvironmental benefits rather than economic gain on profit maximisation alone. Besides, the EBOF contributes and enriches the body of the knowledge about ethical banking operations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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