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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Susanne Gretzinger, Anna Marie Dyhr Ulrich, Svend Hollensen and Birgit Leick

This paper aims to discuss business incubation to enter foreign markets in Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC) countries through the lens of an “international business…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss business incubation to enter foreign markets in Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC) countries through the lens of an “international business incubator” (IBI). International market expansion offers huge opportunities for companies to increase their revenue, but there are also challenging tasks such as the establishment of a business company and the occupation of a strategic position abroad. Practitioners consider this process as the act of incubation, but the theoretical discussion lags behind the practice-led debate.

Design/methodology/approach

An illustrative, and theory-led, case study is presented that describes market expansion to BRIC countries through a network-based IBI. The empirical case is an illustrative Danish company with international operations in BRIC countries both with and without an IBI.

Findings

International business incubation represents a process, which can be influenced through an IBI, and business networking during foreign market entry is shaped by IBI brokerage (bridging, bonding and protecting) in different phases. IBI activities that are embedded in business networking support a company’s endeavours in getting a foothold and acquiring a strategic position in BRIC markets and facilitates the market penetration.

Research limitations/implications

The IBI’s activities to enter foreign markets should be thoroughly managed. Further studies should be conducted with cross-case comparisons and larger samples to reflect on the propositions established.

Originality/value

By linking the business networking theory with the practice-led understanding of business incubation, the study explores an under-conceptualised topic for international business and entrepreneurship scholars. The paper offers an initial understanding of how brokerage interacts with incubation during the entry of new markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Per V. Freytag and Svend Hollensen

Benchmarking is more than giving marks. It is a way of measuring a firm’s strategies and performance against "best‐in‐class” firms, both inside and outside the industry…

Abstract

Benchmarking is more than giving marks. It is a way of measuring a firm’s strategies and performance against "best‐in‐class” firms, both inside and outside the industry. The aim is to identify best practices that can be adopted and implemented by the organization with the purpose of improving a company’s performance. The process of benchmarking is divided into seven phases: which functions to benchmark; importance of each subject area; whom to benchmark against; gather the benchmarking information; identify performance gaps; how to learn from the “best‐in‐class” (benchlearning); and implementation of the changes (benchaction). Benchmarking, benchlearning and benchaction is not a one‐time project. It is a continuous improvement strategy and a change management process. Thus benchmarking is a part of the total quality management (TQM) system, and it relates well to other TQM initiatives.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Svend Hollensen and Christian Schimmelpfennig

This paper aims at shedding some light on the various avenues marketers can undertake until finally an endorsement contract is signed. The focus of the study lies on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at shedding some light on the various avenues marketers can undertake until finally an endorsement contract is signed. The focus of the study lies on verifying the generally held assumption that endorser selection is usually taken care of by creative agencies, vetting several candidates by means of subtle evaluation procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study research has been carried out among companies experienced in celebrity endorsements to learn more about the endorser selection process in practise. Based on these cases theory is inductively developed.

Findings

The research suggests that the generally held assumption that endorsers being selected and thoroughly vetted by a creative agency may not be universally valid. A normative model to illustrate the continuum of the selection process in practise is suggested and the two polar case studies (Swiss brand Lindt and Austrian Vitatherm) are presented in depth.

Research limitations/implications

As the results of the study suggest, generally held assumptions towards the endorser selection process may be challenged. Consequently, this affects the necessary accuracy of models to evaluate the brand‐endorser matchup.

Practical implications

Conducted case studies indicate that there are various avenues how brands come to their endorser. This paper could not find evidence of a best practice strategy.

Originality/value

A normative model for the celebrity endorser selection process is suggested.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Svend Hollensen

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of interactions between theory and management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Single case study, Nintendo, which strategy is being confronted with the strategies of the two competitors, Sony and Microsoft. This is done in order to distinguish the value propositions of the three players in the game console industry

Findings

The main finding is that even if a company can create a Blue Ocean very fast with the right value proposition at the right time, it may be short-termed and may be transformed into a Red Ocean again within 1-2 years, unless the company's competitiveness is safe-guarded.

Practical implications

The results show, that Nintendo started out with a Red Ocean around 2005 with their GameCube. Then they turned it into a Blue Ocean with their introduction of “Wii” in November 2006. But Nintendo could not prevent Sony and Microsoft in turning it back to a Red Ocean, with their introduction of similar product features (motion controls), but at better quality. If Nintendo will be able to reestablish the Blue Ocean with their introduction of the “Wii U” in November 2012 is questionable.

Originality/value

There is constantly a need for reformulating the strategy through a dynamic and creative process, in order not to turn the Blue Ocean into a Red Ocean again.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Svend Hollensen

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how branding is used in an innovative manner, when looking to generate equity and strengthen stakeholder relations …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how branding is used in an innovative manner, when looking to generate equity and strengthen stakeholder relations – by a global car manufacturing company, governed by Iranian Islamic law. Following this, suggested areas of discussion are offered, in the interests of stimulating new thinking and further knowledge – surrounding marketing and branding in a Muslim context; Iranian culture; and the differences between Arab and Persian‐centric approaches, towards an adherence to Islamic ethic.

Design/methodology/approach

Inductive reasoning and syllogisms, as a basis for conceptual metaphor theory and critical discourse analysis. Evidence was gathered via in‐depth interviews, personal observations and experiences; as a result of meetings and the in‐house training of senior decision makers, over a three‐year period. This is further supported by anecdotal evidence; systematic literature reviews; and existing empirical data.

Findings

In the face of strict regulations from the Iranian Government, Iranian religious clergy and wider socio‐political factors, the Saipa Group has developed an innovative approach to generate commercial gains and brand equity. This has been achieved through a brand‐extension strategy, which seeks to engage a wide spectrum of stakeholders, through activities which permeate their working and social lives. From this, a platform is created which enables Saipa to market their core offering of vehicles.

Originality/value

Currently, there exists little academic material examining marketing theory, within the context of organisations seeking to comply with Islamic law and Muslim customs. Furthermore, analysis which is reflective of examining the nuances among different Muslim nations remains scarce. To this end, the following case attempts to highlight and address some of these issues.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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