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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Alice Audrezet, Svein Ottar Olsen and Ana Alina Tudoran

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a bidimensional tool to measure overall service satisfaction: the evaluative space grid (GRID scale). The GRID scale provides a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a bidimensional tool to measure overall service satisfaction: the evaluative space grid (GRID scale). The GRID scale provides a common measure for both positivity and negativity through 25 grid cells. The authors propose to use the GRID scale as an integrated measure of both satisfaction and dissatisfaction to capture mixed reactions or ambivalence.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a cross-sectional between-subjects survey design, this study compares overall satisfaction with bank services as measured on the GRID scale versus a traditional semantic differential (SD) scale.

Findings

The results show that the GRID scale performs as well as the SD scale with respect to different criteria, such as reliability and discriminant, convergent, nomological and predictive validity. However, it allows to measure separately indifference and ambivalence.

Practical implications

Such a distinction assists decision-makers with recommendations on different strategies not only to create customer loyalty based on satisfaction but also to encourage them to think how to decrease the levels of dissatisfaction and ambivalence.

Originality/value

The GRID scale would address survey needs of every business suffering from average performances. This tool provides them better in-depth overall satisfaction information, especially regarding the “middle-ground” customers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Ho Trong Nghia, Svein Ottar Olsen and Nguyen Thi Mai Trang

Adopting the duality approach, this study aims to examine cognitive and affective associations between shopping values, impulse buying tendencies and consumer shopping…

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting the duality approach, this study aims to examine cognitive and affective associations between shopping values, impulse buying tendencies and consumer shopping well-being. In addition, the study also aims to test the moderating role of self-control and compare the proposed relationships across the offline and online shopping contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey dataset was collected from a sample of 529 offline and online consumers in Vietnam. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was employed to test the proposed relationships among the studied constructs.

Findings

The consequence of impulse buying is positive and affect-based. In addition, the positive associations between shopping values and impulse buying via dual process are validated and moderated by self-control. In addition, the association between cognitive impulse buying and shopping well-being is stronger in the online shopping context, whereas hedonic value has more influence on affective impulse buying in the offline shopping context. All other relationships are not statistically different across the two shopping contexts.

Originality/value

This study introduces an appropriate theoretical framework for studying impulse buying—the duality approach. Second, the research validates the dual process and positive consequence of impulse buying. Third, self-control's moderating role is validated, whereas the studied associations are initially compared across shopping contexts.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Ho Trong Nghia, Svein Ottar Olsen and Nguyen Thi Mai Trang

Based on a duality approach, this study examines the path from utilitarian value via cognitive trust versus hedonic value via affective trust in online shopping…

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1166

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a duality approach, this study examines the path from utilitarian value via cognitive trust versus hedonic value via affective trust in online shopping well-being. This study also explores the moderating role of extraversion in the relationships between shopping value and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set collected from 648 online consumers in Vietnam was used to validate the measures employing confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and to test the hypotheses using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results show that online shopping well-being is determined hedonically and affectively rather than in an utilitarian manner and cognitively. Affective trust positively contributes to online shopping well-being, but cognitive trust does not. The dual-process associations between utilitarian shopping value and cognitive trust and between hedonic shopping value and cognitive trust were also confirmed. Finally, extraversion moderates the cognitive and affective associations between shopping values and trust.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on online shopping by applying a dual perspective to confirm the role of hedonic shopping value and affective trust in positively determining online shopping well-being. As a result, this study provides a deeper understanding about if and why online shopping well-being is affect-based, instead of cognition-based.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Ho Huy Tuu, Svein Ottar Olsen and Le Chi Cong

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the combined effects of openness to experience (OE) and power, and the moderator effects of social norms (SN) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the combined effects of openness to experience (OE) and power, and the moderator effects of social norms (SN) and perceived resources on the choice of luxury attributes for branded products in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a self-administered survey data of 207 Vietnamese consumers, a structural equation modeling approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

OE and power have both direct and interactive positive influences on the choice of luxury product attributes. In particular, the effect of OE is weakened by the negative moderator effect of SN, but the effect of power is strengthened by the positive moderator effect of perceived resources. The inclusion of interactions increases the explained variance of the choice of luxury product attributes from 24.8 to 35.8 percent.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies would benefit to investigate other personality traits (e.g. extroversion or agreeableness), personal values (e.g. achievement), SN (e.g. descriptive norms) and resources (e.g. time).

Practical implications

The study findings suggest that brand managers should attend the how individual and social factors interacts in explaining the choice of luxury product attributes.

Originality/value

This study is the first discussing, testing and finding empirical evidence supporting the combined effects of OE and power on the choice of luxury product attributes as well as moderator effects in these relationships.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Morten Heide and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of food quality and prestige benefits when buying food for a special occasion; dinner…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of food quality and prestige benefits when buying food for a special occasion; dinner party with friends.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cluster analysis, the importance of food quality benefits (quality, taste and health) and prestige benefits (prestige quality, hedonic, uniqueness, price and social) were investigated. The consumer segments were profiled using individual consumer characteristics (involvement in luxury, willingness to pay and socio-demographics).

Findings

Food quality benefits are the most important benefits when buying food for a party with friends and the authors identified four distinct consumer segments based on 20 different food quality and prestige benefits: perfectionists, premium, luxury seeking and value focussed. Three of the four consumer segments (perfectionists, premium and luxury seeking) find conventional food quality benefits important but differ in the importance they attribute to the different prestige benefits. The value focussed segment is not driven by prestige consumption but wants high quality at an affordable price.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that consumers are driven by different food and prestige benefits when buying food for a special occasion.

Originality/value

This study suggest some important differences between premium consumers, looking for food quality and hedonic benefits, and luxury seeking, with a relatively higher focus on prestige quality, uniqueness and social benefits. This study also identifies a significant distinction between perfectionists and value focussed consumers. Both segments are focussed on food quality benefits but differ in their focus on value and prestige benefits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Lars Moksness, Svein Ottar Olsen and Ho Huy Tuu

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

A decomposed theory of planned behaviour (TPB) is used as the conceptual framework to investigate a sample of 1,588 researchers from the major universities in Norway. Different latent construct models are analysed with a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The results show that the effect of habit was non-significant in an extended TPB framework where attitude was most important, followed by norms and perceived behavioural control in explaining intention to submit OA. Habit was only found to have a significant impact on intention to submit OA when it played a role as a full mediator for the effects of the intentional antecedents. In this modified model, norms were found to have a stronger effect than attitudes in explaining the habit to submit OA. OA habit strength forms intentions to publish in OA journals and reduces the intention to publish and publishing behaviour in NOA journals.

Research limitations/implications

Other individual forces (e.g. personality and personal values) and the role of habit strength should be included for future research.

Practical implications

The results provide empirical insights to management, policy makers and research on scholarly publishing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes not only to the understanding of OA scholarly publishing, but is also relevant for research on what drives (academic) data sharing, knowledge sharing, the sharing economy or the open source movement.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Nguyen Huu Khoi, Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the direct and indirect effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social values integrated into the theory of planned behaviour…

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1105

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the direct and indirect effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social values integrated into the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to achieve a deeper understanding of consumers’ intention to adopt mobile commerce (MC) in the context of a developing country, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on self-administered survey data of 382 Vietnamese consumers, a structural equation modelling approach with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived values explain consumer attitudes, subjective norms and behavioural intentions in the MC context. In particular, they help to increase the explained variance of the intention to adopt MC by about 9.58 per cent compared with the TPB. Finally, a cross-effect on consumer attitudes from subjective norms is also found.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies would benefit from investigating other variables (e.g. innovativeness or trust) and using actual behaviour (e.g. online purchases).

Practical implications

Business managers should pay attention to different forms of consumer values to understand how and why consumers adopt MC in a developing country.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the literature by simultaneously investigating the role of utilitarian, hedonic and social value in a TPB model in the MC context.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Lars Moksness and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the…

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1083

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the intention to publish open access (OA), and how personal innovativeness in information technology affects attitude and PBC.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an integrated and extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework within a cross-sectional survey design. The sample consists of researchers at a Norwegian university, and data are collected digitally via e-mail invitation and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study determines that attitude is the strongest predictor of the intention to publish OA, followed by injunctive and descriptive social norms, and PBC capacity and autonomy. All factors positively influence intention apart from PBC autonomy, which has a negative effect.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations include: a relatively small sample size, self-reported data and employing intention, not behavior, as the ultimate dependent variable.

Practical implications

This research contributes with a deeper understanding of what drives the intention to publish OA research articles, and how innovativeness affects attitudes and PBC autonomy. Support is found for an extended TPB model with decomposed normative and PBC components. This knowledge is essential in creating an impetus for systematic research on OA publishing behavior.

Originality/value

Theory-driven research into understanding OA publishing behavior is rare. Decomposing the normative and PBC constructs is uncommon in TPB research, and a novel approach in OA research. Personal innovativeness has not been explored previously in relation to OA publishing.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the combined moderator role of consideration set size (CSS) and variety seeking (VS) on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship, and…

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3306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the combined moderator role of consideration set size (CSS) and variety seeking (VS) on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship, and uses theories and findings mostly from the brand literature to test some hypotheses at a product category level.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use survey data of 487 Vietnamese consumers in a food context. A structural equation modelling (SEM) approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

CSS has a positive effect on CRL, while VS has a negative effect on CRL. CSS is found to have a positive moderator effect on the category satisfaction-category repurchase loyalty relationship. More interestingly, CSS still interacts with VS to positively influence this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The object and setting of this study is limited to one product category in one market. The nature of causality is problematic due to the use of survey design.

Practical implications

Those findings imply that a product category extension with alternatives providing complementary benefits will have a higher chance of success with satisfied consumers, especially those with high VS, than with less satisfied consumers.

Social implications

The study recommends that people should vary their diet to achieve different kinds of vitamins, minerals and tastes for their health. Similarly, the tourism industry should satisfy tourists ' variety-seeking needs by exploring new categories.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by discussing and highlighting positive moderator effects of CSS and VS on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship at a product category level. The findings are contrast with brand literature which confirms negative moderator effects of CSS and VS on this relationship.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Ho Huy Tuu, Svein Ottar Olsen and Pham Thi Thuy Linh

This study aims to discuss and test the combined role of perceived risk, objective knowledge and certainty as moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship.

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5036

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss and test the combined role of perceived risk, objective knowledge and certainty as moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use survey data of 387 Vietnamese consumers in a food context. A structural equation modeling (SEM) approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived risk is a barrier in the forming of loyalty with a negative moderating effect on the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship. However, the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship is stronger when objective knowledge and certainty increase.

Research limitations/implications

The object and setting are limited to one product category in one market. In addition, other moderators (e.g. situation and ambivalence) can be added. The nature of causality is problematic due to the use of survey design.

Practical implications

Customer management based on satisfaction is not sufficient to keep customers' loyalty, especially in the situations of highly perceived risk and uncertainty. Marketing strategies, which reduce consumers' risks, consolidate their confidence and educate them with relevant knowledge, may be effective strategies to increase their loyalty.

Originality/value

The study fills several gaps in the present literature. First, it overcomes some shortcomings of previous studies of moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship by testing the combined role of three important moderators. Second, it tests the moderator effect of objective knowledge and adds an extra explanation to previous studies. While some previous studies suggest a negative moderator effect of subjective knowledge, this paper argues for and confirms a positive moderator effect of objective knowledge on this relationship. Finally, it uses SEM for moderator analysis with latent constructs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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