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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Svein Larsen and Ingebjørg S. Folgerø

Explores the communication structure of a cruise company. Arguesthat communication is a key area concerning productivity and jobsatisfaction on board cruise ships. The…

Abstract

Explores the communication structure of a cruise company. Argues that communication is a key area concerning productivity and job satisfaction on board cruise ships. The Communication Climate Inventory was distributed to all employees in the company, and returned satisfactorily filled in by 236 employees. It was found that the degree of defensiveness was higher and the degree of supportiveness was lower on board ships than for the company′s land‐based operations. Interprets the results in view of organizational climate, culture and traditions. Makes suggestions concerning appropriate measures to be taken in order to improve on current communication practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Svein Larsen and Trond Bastiansen

It is commonly believed that service attitudes are more positive inthe private than in the public sector of the service industry. Theproblems are addressed here. The aim…

Abstract

It is commonly believed that service attitudes are more positive in the private than in the public sector of the service industry. The problems are addressed here. The aim of the project was to study service attitudes in hotel and restaurant staff compared to nurses in public hospitals. An instrument for measuring service attitudes, the Service Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ) was developed. This instrument aimed at measuring cognitive, emotional and behavioural aspects of service attitudes. A total of 62 respondents in the Stavanger region, Norway, completed the SAQ. The results indicated that service attitudes were more positive in the private (hotel and restaurant staff) than in the public sector (registered nurses). Hotel and restaurant staff scored higher (more positive service attitudes) on the cognitive, emotional and behavioural components of the SAQ.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Svein Larsen and Lotti Aske

Addresses the feasibility of applying the theatre analogy in theservice industries, where terms borrowed from the stage are usedfrequently to describe guest‐customer…

Abstract

Addresses the feasibility of applying the theatre analogy in the service industries, where terms borrowed from the stage are used frequently to describe guest‐customer relations and interaction. Principles from the fragments of Aristotle′s Peri Poietikes supplied the framework for a critical look at the hospitality industry in Norway. The authors concluded that, where investments with a purpose of improving customer satisfaction are planned, they are most likely to achieve results when applied to the human resources sector. On the theatre stage as well as in the service theatre, customer satisfaction is dependent on the actors and their performance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Åge Diseth, Ståle Pallesen, Anders Hovland and Svein Larsen

The present study seeks to compare scores on factors from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) with scores on an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to compare scores on factors from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) with scores on an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) and examination grade among undergraduate psychology students. The purpose is to investigate the relationship between course experience and approaches to learning, and to examine their relative importance as predictors of academic achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modelling were utilised in order to find measurement models for each of the constructs and to test hypothesised structural relations between these constructs.

Findings

The original CEQ and ASSIST factors were reproduced. A model in which course experience factors predicted SAL was supported, but the same model did not provide evidence for any indirect or mediator effect between course experience, approaches to learning and academic achievement. Indirect empirical support for a hypothesised causal link between course experience and approaches to learning was found.

Research limitations/implications

Weak relations between the predictor variables (course experience/approaches to learning) and academic achievement limited the possibility of identifying mediator effects, and future research should address this issue.

Practical implications

Lecturers and course designers should take into account that students' approaches to learning are influenced by course experience, especially with respect to the adoption of a surface approach to learning.

Originality/value

This paper included a comparison between course experience, approaches to learning, and academic achievement, whereas most previous research has not included academic achievement. The utilisation of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling gave a stronger test of construct validity than exploratory analyses, and it facilitated the testing of hypothesised structural models.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Maximiliano E. Korstanje and Babu George

Religious beliefs cloud people's understanding of the meaning of terror, and this factor alone complicates the management of terror in religious tourism settings. In this…

Abstract

Religious beliefs cloud people's understanding of the meaning of terror, and this factor alone complicates the management of terror in religious tourism settings. In this chapter, we discuss the interconnectedness between religion and terror in the context of religious tourism. We examine the nature of security that provides safety for the religious tourist without adulterating the spiritual experiences of worshippers. Religious faith is known to provide the social trust necessary for a society to function systematically, but touristification of places of worship is often the cause of distress in many communities. Historically, religions have inspired useful leadership practices, and we conclude the chapter with a discussion on crisis leadership ideas that are apt for religious tourism management.

Details

Tourism, Terrorism and Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-905-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

This introductory chapter synthesises an extensive and hot debate revolving around the role of precautionary doctrine in tourism fields. Although the industry faces…

Abstract

This introductory chapter synthesises an extensive and hot debate revolving around the role of precautionary doctrine in tourism fields. Although the industry faces serious risks and dangers, terrorism – just after 9/11 – situates as the most dangerous hazard and as a challenge for policymakers and practitioners. We have reviewed the pros and cons of the most important academic schools that focused on tourism security and risk perception theory. The urgency is given in creating a bridge between theory and practice in order to articulate the policies to the nature of each risk. Today risk perception theory lacks a robust methodological background that invariably led to a gridlock. Whether the demographic school advances in the multivariable correlation between class, ideology, income or education with risk perception, the sociological school lays the foundations towards a much deeper understanding of the impacts of risks in society. Rather, the radical turn – coming from a Marxist tradition – focuses on the limitations of risk perception theory. Finally, authors who form the psychological tradition, as stated in this chapter, highlight on the complexity of emotions and the inner world. All chapters in this book aim to provide fresh practical cases that reflect the socio-cultural background of the four continents.

Details

Tourism, Terrorism and Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-905-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Darren Lee‐Ross

The following study sought to develop an instrument to elicit the service predispositions of nurses and hospitality foodservice workers. Results of a pilot study suggested…

Abstract

The following study sought to develop an instrument to elicit the service predispositions of nurses and hospitality foodservice workers. Results of a pilot study suggested that the service predisposition instrument (SPI) was valid and therefore appropriate to investigate the service attitudes of these workers. Service predispositions of nurses from two NHS Trusts were compared with those of hospitality foodservice workers in two large hotels. Overall, both nurses and foodservice workers were found to have similar positive service predis‐ positions. However, significant differences were present between groups for certain service dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Alice Audrezet, Svein Ottar Olsen and Ana Alina Tudoran

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a bidimensional tool to measure overall service satisfaction: the evaluative space grid (GRID scale). The GRID scale provides a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a bidimensional tool to measure overall service satisfaction: the evaluative space grid (GRID scale). The GRID scale provides a common measure for both positivity and negativity through 25 grid cells. The authors propose to use the GRID scale as an integrated measure of both satisfaction and dissatisfaction to capture mixed reactions or ambivalence.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a cross-sectional between-subjects survey design, this study compares overall satisfaction with bank services as measured on the GRID scale versus a traditional semantic differential (SD) scale.

Findings

The results show that the GRID scale performs as well as the SD scale with respect to different criteria, such as reliability and discriminant, convergent, nomological and predictive validity. However, it allows to measure separately indifference and ambivalence.

Practical implications

Such a distinction assists decision-makers with recommendations on different strategies not only to create customer loyalty based on satisfaction but also to encourage them to think how to decrease the levels of dissatisfaction and ambivalence.

Originality/value

The GRID scale would address survey needs of every business suffering from average performances. This tool provides them better in-depth overall satisfaction information, especially regarding the “middle-ground” customers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Carmel Lindkvist, Alenka Temeljotov Salaj, Dave Collins, Svein Bjørberg and Tore Brandstveit Haugen

The purpose of this study is to explore how the discipline facilities management (FM) can be developed in a smart city perspective through considering the current and new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how the discipline facilities management (FM) can be developed in a smart city perspective through considering the current and new FM services under the role of Urban FM, as well as governance structures that limit and enable it.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is primarily theoretical by examining current literature around the ideas of Urban FM and Smart Cities linking them to observations in one city aiming to be a Smart City. This specific paper focusses on maintenance management, workspace management and energy management services in a Smart City perspective.

Findings

The results outline how Urban FM can fill the gaps that are apparent in city planning through connectivity to communities and neighbourhoods using the Smart City not only approaches of optimising data but also considers prominent governance structures of FM, Urban FM, City Planning and Smart Cities. The study addresses the limitations of what can be done when cities are not organisations, which make identifying the “core business” obscure and intangible but attempts to overcome this limitation by considering social value in communities and wider linkages to the city environment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper sets out the potential of Urban FM in Smart Cities, but the findings are limited to primarily theoretical research and need further empirical examination.

Practical implications

The results indicate how facilities management can improve services in cities through the digitalisation of cities and the role of Urban FM. The study will be useful for municipalities in examining how to improve facilities, particularly in cities that aspire to be a Smart City and it is also important for policymakers in considering governance structures to meet sustainable development goals.

Originality/value

The study positions the discipline of facilities management in Smart Cities which has the potential to improve facilities in cities and the development of Urban FM.

Details

Facilities, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Svein Møthe, Brit Olaug Bolken Ballangrud and Bjørn Stensaker

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze how appointed leaders in Norwegian higher education perceive their role and influence, and their discretion as academic leaders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how appointed leaders in Norwegian higher education perceive their role and influence, and their discretion as academic leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies strategic, cultural and political perspectives on leadership to investigate the understanding and perceptions held by academic leaders regarding their own work. The study applied a qualitative strategy based on a cross-sectional design. The findings are based on semi-structured interviews with 18 purposefully selected academic leaders.

Findings

The findings reveal that appointed academic leaders are struggling with traditions and cultures and current governing structures and funding mechanisms on the other. The paper argues that this dilemma limits the potential for academic leaders to instigate change and that leadership perhaps has been overemphasized as a factor driving transformation of higher education.

Originality/value

The paper suggests the heated debates in Norway about whether academic leaders should be elected or appointed has limited relevance for understanding how academic leadership is performed in the actual daily work of leaders. The paper suggest that the current interest in selection of leaders perhaps should be downplayed in favor of a perspective focussing on the cultural factors framing current leadership practices.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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