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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Sally Hibbert and Suzanne Horne

Notes that changes in the charity environment mean that fundraisers need to increase income from donations. Argues that to move forward donor behavior research needs to…

Abstract

Notes that changes in the charity environment mean that fundraisers need to increase income from donations. Argues that to move forward donor behavior research needs to look not only at “why” people make donations but also at the process of “how” donations are made. Proposes that valuable lessons may be learnt through consideration of advances made in the field of consumer behavior where researchers have long focussed on decision‐making processes as a concept which is central to the understanding of how consumers behave. Suggests that taking account of the circumstances in which the consumer acts will give insight into donor behavior, which avoids losing sight of the reality of donation occasions.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Steve Worthington and Suzanne Horne

To enable research to be conducted into the validity of the relationship marketing paradigm, a model has been developed which allows researchers to test the…

Abstract

To enable research to be conducted into the validity of the relationship marketing paradigm, a model has been developed which allows researchers to test the characteristics of the relationship at any point in time. This model is rooted in the biological sciences and is based around the concept of symbiosis. It has been adapted to offer a five part classification of relationships and used during an on‐going research programme into affinity credit card relationships. The results of the research indicate that the majority of the “relationship managers” employed by a sample of charities with affinity credit cards, perceive their relationship with their credit card issuer to be of equal benefit to both organisations, and thus fit the classification of the model. From the comments of the relationship managers in the research interviews there is, however, also evidence of some degrees of some of the other classifications in the proposed model of relationships.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Suzanne Horne, Pete Naudé and Steve Worthington

Aims to expand the traditional view of marketing to include a wider network of actors, all of which have a role to play in executing transactions. Measurement has…

Abstract

Aims to expand the traditional view of marketing to include a wider network of actors, all of which have a role to play in executing transactions. Measurement has traditionally been a stumbling‐block: while the importance of actors other than those forming the traditional dyad is accepted, it has not been easy to determine empirically what it is that the different partners want from the relationship. In this paper we present a possible way forward. The preliminary work presented here is based on the affinity credit card market which has three clear partners in a triad: the bank, the affinity group itself, and the customers that elect to make use of the card. We present some early results that indicate the extent to which these three partners do, and do not, have an overlapping understanding of each other’s needs.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Suzanne Horne

Charity retailing has been a successful sector of the retail market since the late 1980s. Charity shops have blossomed on the streets of towns and cities in the UK to…

Abstract

Charity retailing has been a successful sector of the retail market since the late 1980s. Charity shops have blossomed on the streets of towns and cities in the UK to become a feature of interest for retail academics and concern for the conventional retailer. They have the potential to serve four purposes in that they offer a social service, enable the recycling of goods, help to raise awareness of the charity and provide a fundraising medium. With increased professionalism in their operations, competition has escalated for customers, goods and volunteers, both with other charities and with established retailers in terms of business rates relief. The increased competition from within and without poses the problem of retail strategy for the future. Suggestions for future development include developing a strong brand image in order to attract and secure customer loyalty, and joint ventures with other retailers and charities. There is no doubt that the charity shop can provide a very successful means of raising funds.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Steve Worthington and Suzanne Horne

The credit card industry in the UK has a growing number of affinitycards, some of which are specifically aimed at the alumni ofuniversities. Discusses the evolution of the…

Abstract

The credit card industry in the UK has a growing number of affinity cards, some of which are specifically aimed at the alumni of universities. Discusses the evolution of the relationship between the university alumni officers and the credit card issuers responsible for the alumni affinity cards. Bases the research on a five‐phase model of relationship formation and describes how the alumni officers perceive their relationship with their affinity card issuers through the phases of awareness, exploration, expansion, commitment and dissolution. Concludes that the entry of the affinity card issuer potentially dilutes the strength of the relationship between the alumni and their university, as the card issuer seeks to build a direct relationship with the alumni affinity cardholders. Alumni officers and others responsible for initiating affinity credit card agreements, therefore, need to be aware of both the benefits and costs of establishing and maintaining relationships with affinity credit card issuers.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Suzanne Horne and Adelina Broadbridge

Little attention has been paid to the evolution of charityretailing. A recent upturn in interest results from an increase in thenumber of charity shops in operation and…

Abstract

Little attention has been paid to the evolution of charity retailing. A recent upturn in interest results from an increase in the number of charity shops in operation and their increasingly professional management. Charity retailing has expanded and developed over the past decade and the rapid expansion in numbers in the 1980s has heightened interest in them, although they do not feature as a sector in their own right in retail statistics. Explores the development of charity shops and suggests a three‐fold category classification. The definition of charity trading relies largely on the mix of the merchandise being sold and this mix determines the three categories of charity retailing. The classification highlights trading implications of technology and competition which in turn affect volunteers, customers, other charities and established retailers alike.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Steve Worthington and Suzanne Horne

Examines the history and economics of the credit card beforedescribing the origins of the affinity card concept both in the USA andthe UK. Explores different strategies of…

Abstract

Examines the history and economics of the credit card before describing the origins of the affinity card concept both in the USA and the UK. Explores different strategies of some major UK affinity card issuers and the aspirations of the affinity groups with whom a mutually beneficial relationship is sought. Successful affinity cards occur where the expectations of the card issuer are met by the aspirations of the affinity group and examples are used to illustrate a good and bad “fit”. Considers the current pressures on affinity cards and offers some thoughts on the need for a mutual understanding of the aspirations of both issuer and affinity group.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Jonathan Stone, Suzanne Horne and Sally Hibbert

Describes car boot sales as an alternative retail format focusing on consumers’ shopping motives and related shopping behaviour in this type of retail setting. Concludes…

Abstract

Describes car boot sales as an alternative retail format focusing on consumers’ shopping motives and related shopping behaviour in this type of retail setting. Concludes that car boot sales appeal more to middle and lower social class groups. Further concludes the growth of the car boot sale is largely due to the functional needs and non‐functional wants of these sub‐groups.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Abstract

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Program, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Abstract

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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