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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Siobhan Fox, Niamh O'Connor, Johnathan Drennan, Suzanne Guerin, W. George Kernohan, Aileen Murphy and Suzanne Timmons

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia…

Abstract

Purpose

The Model for Dementia Palliative Care Project will develop a service-delivery model for community-based dementia palliative care. Many countries provide dementia palliative care services, albeit with considerable variability within these. However, little is known about what service providers consider to be the most important components of a dementia palliative care model. This study aimed to address this knowledge gap.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory design using a survey method was used as an initial phase of the wider project. A web-based survey was developed, piloted (n = 5), revised, and distributed within five healthcare jurisdictions: the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Scotland, and Wales. The target population was health and social care professionals, policymakers, and academics interested in dementia and palliative care. Content analysis of open-ended questions identified common themes; descriptive statistics were applied to the closed-ended questions.

Findings

Overall, N = 112 complete surveys were received. Key care principles incorporated the philosophies of palliative care and dementia care; many described “holistic” and “person-centred care” as the core. Important individual service components were the support for carers, advanced care planning, information, education and training, activities for “meaningful living”, comprehensive disease management, coordinated case management, and linking with community health services and social activities. Barriers included poor availability and organisation of healthcare services, stigma, misconceptions around dementia prognosis, insufficiently advanced care planning, and dementia-related challenges to care. Facilitators included education, carer support, and therapeutic relationships.

Originality/value

This study, as part of the larger project, will directly inform the development of a novel service delivery Model of Dementia Palliative Care for Ireland. The results can also inform service planning and design in other countries.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1950

E.M.R. DITMAS

AT the very outset of this paper it is necessary to make clear that it is not an attempt to compile an exhaustive bibliography of literature relating to special…

Abstract

AT the very outset of this paper it is necessary to make clear that it is not an attempt to compile an exhaustive bibliography of literature relating to special librarianship. Neither space nor time permit this. In fact, the references given can only claim to be a sample of the wealth of material on the subject and this paper is submitted in the hope that it will stimulate others to more scholarly efforts. Reference numbers throughout this paper refer to items in the ‘Select list of references to the literature of special librarianship’, section 2 onwards.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Gina Grandy, Wendy Cukier and Suzanne Gagnon

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the…

2492

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece contributes to the special issue on COVID-19 and the impact on women entrepreneurs. Specifically, it applies an (in)visibility lens to argue that responses to COVID-19 in Canada negatively affect women entrepreneurs disproportionately and that while initiatives such as the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub (WEKH) are threatened, they can also serve as an agitator during this time to advocate for an inclusive recovery approach.

Findings

Despite progress through such government funded initiatives as the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), which is targeting more than $2bn (Cdn) in investments towards women entrepreneurs, structural inequality and the (in)visibility of women’s entrepreneurship has been amplified during COVID-19. Through a particular understanding of the (in)visibility vortex notion (Lewis and Simpson, 2010), it is concluded the (in)visibility of women entrepreneurs as deeply embedded and that there is a continued need to advocate for a gender and diversity lens, to ensure inclusive recovery that benefits women and diverse entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

An (in)visibility lens brings an important addition to the literature on women’s entrepreneurship, as well as illuminates the important differences within this broad category, deepening the understanding of these trends and their impact during COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights how the complexities of intersectionality are critical to understand, and their recognition can help to drive a clear evidence base, as well as advocacy. The piece call researchers and practitioners alike to consider the question under COVID-19, will these conditions create a new vortex in this domain, or can the work of organizations and researchers position gender and intersectionality in women entrepreneurship as a disrupter for the future?

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

65225

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Brian J. Taylor, Insa Osterhus, Rachel Stewart, Suzanne Cunningham, Olive MacLeod and Mary McColgan

This study explored the feasibility of developing scaled inspection tools for use during external inspection of health and social care facilities to give improved accuracy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the feasibility of developing scaled inspection tools for use during external inspection of health and social care facilities to give improved accuracy in identifying facilities “at risk”, a tool for risk-adjusted frequency of inspection, and greater consistency of judgements.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper summarises the development through working groups and workshops involving 20 experienced inspectors (nurses and social workers) of the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority who inspect the 206 nursing and 182 residential care homes in Northern Ireland. A brief evaluation survey, including response to a case vignette, gathered inspectors' views after using the tools for six months.

Findings

Eight two-dimensional Scaled Inspection Tools were created, each embodying a scale of performance (seriousness of risk issue) and a scale of the ability of the facility to manage that issue, each axis comprising four points. The Scaled Inspection Tools were used for on-site inspections during 2017–18. Evaluative comments were generally positive. The case vignette seemed to highlight greater risk aversion amongst newer inspectors.

Research limitations/implications

The creation of scaled inspection tools adds credibility to the potential for developing risk-based governance in service regulation. Further testing of domains and their scope is required.

Practical implications

Prompts for each domain were found essential to guide inspectors. Despite the challenge of change, inspectors became enthusiastic about use for evaluating risks, and managers about improvements in consistency of inspection.

Social implications

Knowledge derived from statistical approaches needs to be incorporated into inspection and regulation, just as in other aspects of professional practice.

Originality/value

Scaled inspection tools, with two orthogonal axes corresponding to seriousness of risk and ability to manage the risk (inverse of likelihood of harm), proved acceptable and intuitive in use. The study gives credibility to the possibility of developing screening and surveillance approaches to risk-based governance in service regulation.

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