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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Gina Grandy, Wendy Cukier and Suzanne Gagnon

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the…

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2201

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece contributes to the special issue on COVID-19 and the impact on women entrepreneurs. Specifically, it applies an (in)visibility lens to argue that responses to COVID-19 in Canada negatively affect women entrepreneurs disproportionately and that while initiatives such as the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub (WEKH) are threatened, they can also serve as an agitator during this time to advocate for an inclusive recovery approach.

Findings

Despite progress through such government funded initiatives as the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), which is targeting more than $2bn (Cdn) in investments towards women entrepreneurs, structural inequality and the (in)visibility of women’s entrepreneurship has been amplified during COVID-19. Through a particular understanding of the (in)visibility vortex notion (Lewis and Simpson, 2010), it is concluded the (in)visibility of women entrepreneurs as deeply embedded and that there is a continued need to advocate for a gender and diversity lens, to ensure inclusive recovery that benefits women and diverse entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

An (in)visibility lens brings an important addition to the literature on women’s entrepreneurship, as well as illuminates the important differences within this broad category, deepening the understanding of these trends and their impact during COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights how the complexities of intersectionality are critical to understand, and their recognition can help to drive a clear evidence base, as well as advocacy. The piece call researchers and practitioners alike to consider the question under COVID-19, will these conditions create a new vortex in this domain, or can the work of organizations and researchers position gender and intersectionality in women entrepreneurship as a disrupter for the future?

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Wendy Cukier, Suzanne Gagnon and Ruby Latif

This paper examines actors and discourses shaping new Canadian legislation designed to advance diversity in corporate governance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines actors and discourses shaping new Canadian legislation designed to advance diversity in corporate governance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs a stakeholder and discourse analysis drawing on texts of parliamentary debates.

Findings

The paper illuminates tensions regarding definitions of diversity, its importance for boards of directors and the mechanisms favoured for implementation. Official discourses examined show that, unlike for other political issues, opposition was largely muted, and most stakeholders engaged in the process supported legislation advancing diversity. Nonetheless areas of debate and positioning by actors and suggest important differences, with outcomes linked to non-traditional power bases.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insights into the discursive environments of organizations and processes relating to promoting diversity and equality in the political decision-making domain, a critical venue for understanding advancement of equity, often neglected in organizational studies.

Practical implications

By understanding the complex and competing discourses surrounding diversity and inclusion at the macro level this paper provides a context for understanding organizational (meso) and individual (micro) beliefs and behaviours.

Social implications

This study shows how advocacy shapes how policy and legislation are framed and the ways mainstream organizations, including women's groups, may advance gender equality without regard to other dimensions of diversity or intersectionality.

Originality/value

This study maps the political discourse around recent Canadian legislation designed to improve diversity on boards that must, in the Canadian context, address more than gender.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Wendy Cukier, Suzanne Gagnon, Laura Mae Lindo, Charity Hannan and Sarah Amato

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the experience gained from a large multi-sector action research project aimed at promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in organizations, this chapter proposes a multilayer [Critical] Ecological Model.

Findings

While early critical theorists were committed to effecting change, the rise of post-modern critical theory eroded the ground on which to stand, widening the gap between theory and practice. Secondly, the chapter asserts the importance of linking empirical research and critical theory in order to advance equality seeking projects. Thirdly, the chapter provides a [Critical] Ecological model that bridges theory and action in Critical Management Studies, based partly on experience from a large community-based research project. The need for a multifaceted approach to advance equality and inclusion emerged as a way to bridge ideological differences among actors and academics committed to effecting social change.

Practical implications

By addressing directly the challenges of theoretical rifts as well as differences in research focused on micro, meso and macro levels, the chapter builds a framework to allow different stakeholders – scholars, practitioners, activists and change agents across sectors – to take action in advancing inclusion and equality as well as an understanding of interactions between levels.

Originality/value

While sharing similar goals, many approaches to change are fragmented on the level of analysis and by underlying paradigms. This chapter is unique in its focus on ways to bridge theory and practice and to develop a framework for action that accommodates equality seeking theorists and activists working on several levels.

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ian Kessler, Paul Heron and Suzanne Gagnon

The purpose of this article is to evaluate employee perceptions of pay practice in civil service executive agencies in the wake of changes in the established institutions…

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4349

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to evaluate employee perceptions of pay practice in civil service executive agencies in the wake of changes in the established institutions of pay determination.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design drawing original data from 1,057 civil servants, all members of the IPMS (now merged with EMA to form Prospectus), the union representing scientific, technical and professional occupations in the civil service.

Findings

The study distinguishes four distinctive pay practice systems. Pay satisfaction is found to be positively related to two principles: a clear effort‐reward link and an understanding of pay criteria. However, employees are more satisfied with pay when their organisational pay system accords with traditional rather than newer practices. This suggests that embedded norms continue to exert a powerful influence over employee perceptions of pay.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the respondent profile accurately reflects those working in the scientific, professional and technical grades (predominantly male, white, full‐time workers), aspects of this profile do not accurately reflect the civil service as a whole.

Practical implications

Old habits “die hard”. A sobering message for those practitioners who readily assume that forced change in pay systems will elicit “desired” employee responses.

Originality/value

Against a backdrop of fundamental changes in the character of pay determination in the civil service, this study presents employee perceptions of pay practices, shows how they combine in ways that reflect a distinct set of pay systems and reveals the impact associated with these systems on attitudes and behaviours.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Suzanne Gagnon

Under the British Government’s current plan, the devolution of authority for civil service pay will be complete in 1996, with all departments and agencies receiving…

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1166

Abstract

Under the British Government’s current plan, the devolution of authority for civil service pay will be complete in 1996, with all departments and agencies receiving control over the pay of their employees. The process of pay delegation began some years ago with selected Next Steps executive agencies. What lessons does the progress of the Conservative administration’s pay reform programme hold for the future? In examining the success that the government has had so far with delegation of pay to executive agencies, centres on primary research involving a postal survey of executive agencies and in‐depth interviews with several agency human resources directors. Provides an insight into the shape that pay reform is likely to take as further devolution occurs. Reform is unlikely to be either as rapid, coherent or concerted as the government would like. Concludes that while there is little question that change is occurring, its pace has not kept up with the government’s deadlines, and its form is only partially in line with the government’s stated objectives. Identifies several factors explaining the slow progress, most importantly: the internal inconsistencies among the government’s pay reform objectives; the uncertain environment in which many agencies are operating; agencies’ lack of resources; and a failure to take account of the institutional context.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Réjean Hébert, Anne Veil, Michel Raîche, Marie‐France Dubois, Nicole Dubuc and Michel Tousignant

PRISMA is the only example of a co‐ordinated‐type model to be developed and fully implemented with a process and outcome evaluation. The PRISMA model was implemented in…

Abstract

PRISMA is the only example of a co‐ordinated‐type model to be developed and fully implemented with a process and outcome evaluation. The PRISMA model was implemented in three areas (urban, rural with or without a local hospital) in Quebec, Canada and an implementation evaluation was carried out using mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods. Over four years, the implementation rates went from 22% to 79%. The perception of integration by managers and clinicians working in the various organisations of the network shows that most interactions are perceived as at the co‐operation level, some getting the highest collaboration level. The perception of the efficacy of case managers was very high. Implementing such a model is feasible, and the decision to generalise it was made in Quebec. This model might be more appropriate for a universal publicly funded health care system like those in Canada, the UK and the Scandinavian countries.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Abstract

Details

Grassroots Leadership and the Arts for Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-687-1

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