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Article

A. Mazeika Bilbao, A.L. Carrano, M. Hewitt and B.K. Thorn

This paper seeks to frame and model the environmental issues and impacts associated with the management of pallets throughout the entire life cycle, from materials to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to frame and model the environmental issues and impacts associated with the management of pallets throughout the entire life cycle, from materials to manufacturing, use, transportation to end‐of‐life disposal.

Design/methodology/approach

A linear minimum cost multi‐commodity network flow problem is developed to make pallet‐related decisions based on both environmental and economic considerations.

Findings

This paper presents a review of the environmental impacts associated with pallets by life cycle stage. The types of materials used to fabricate pallets, the methods by which they are treated for specific applications, and various pallet management models are described with respect to embodied energies, toxicity and emissions. The need for companies to understand the cost, durability, and environmental impact tradeoffs presented by pallet choices is highlighted. The paper introduces a model to assist in choosing both how pallets are managed and the material they are constructed of that balances these tradeoffs.

Originality/value

There is limited research on the environmental impact of different management approaches of large‐scale pallet operations. The proposed model and approach will provide companies seeking to engage in more sustainable practices in their supply chains and distribution with insights and a decision‐making tool not previously available.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article

Bhavin Shah and Vivek Khanzode

The retail revolution swing from traditional distribution to e-tailing services and unprecedented increase in internet adoption insist practitioners to diversely plan…

Abstract

Purpose

The retail revolution swing from traditional distribution to e-tailing services and unprecedented increase in internet adoption insist practitioners to diversely plan warehousing strategies. More than practically required storage space has been identified as wastes, and also it does not improve performance. An organized framework integrating storage design policies, operational performance and customer value improvement for retail-distribution management is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop broad guidelines to design the “just-right” amount of forward area, i.e., “lean buffer” answering the following questions: “What should be lean buffer size? How effective the forward area is? As per demand variations, which storage waste (SKU) should be allocated with how much storage space? What is the amount of storage waste (SW)? How smooth the material flow is in between reserve-forward area?” for storage allocation in cosmetics distribution centers.

Design/methodology/approach

After forecasting static storage allocation between two planning horizons, if a particular SKU is less or non-moving, then it will cause SW, as the occupied location can be utilized by other competing SKUs, and also it impedes material flow for an instance. A dynamically efficient and self-adaptive, knapsack instance based heuristics is developed in order to make effective storage utilization.

Findings

The existing state-of-the-art under study is supported with a distribution center case, and the study investigates the need of a model adopting lean management approach in storage allocation policies along with test results in LINGO. The sensitivity analysis describes the impact of varying demand and buffer size on performance. The results are compared with uniform and exponential distributed demands, and findings reveal that the proposed heuristics improves efficiency and reduce SWs in forward-reserve area.

Originality/value

The presented model demonstrates a novel thinking of lean adoption in designing storage allocation strategy and its performance measures while reducing wastes and improving customer value. Future research issues are highlighted, which may be of great help to the researchers who would like to explore the emerging field of lean adoption for sustainable retail and distribution operations.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Jesús García-Arca, J. Carlos Prado-Prado and A. Trinidad Gonzalez-Portela Garrido

The purpose of this paper is to examine the aspects of internal and external transformation that take place in each company along the supply chain when a “sustainable

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the aspects of internal and external transformation that take place in each company along the supply chain when a “sustainable packaging logistics” approach is implemented. Before this can be achieved, it is necessary to identify and characterise the principal cornerstones and stages associated with this implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper the combination of “case study” and “action research” techniques have been chosen. It has been analysed the implementation of “sustainable packaging logistics” in the supply chain of Mercadona (one of the largest retailers in Spain), paying special attention to the implementation and evolution in one of its main food suppliers.

Findings

To adopt a “Sustainable Packaging Logistics” approach allows for a proactive integration of the efficiency and sustainability in supply chains. The proposal to implement “sustainable packaging logistics”, based on four cornerstones and three stages of evolution is particularly significant, while contributing to improved competitiveness. This implementation constitutes an evolutionary process which is conditioned by how each area, department or company along the supply chain interpret and assess different packaging features over time.

Research limitations/implications

The model is based on a single supply chain analysis.

Originality/value

This paper may be of interest both for researchers and professionals, because the model can aid companies in improving their global vision of product and packaging design in order to jointly increase sustainability and efficiency in the supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Asoke Dey, Paul LaGuardia and Mahesh Srinivasan

The purpose of this study is to examine the current state of sustainability efforts within the field of supply chain management, more specifically supply chain logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the current state of sustainability efforts within the field of supply chain management, more specifically supply chain logistics operations, and to identify opportunities and provide recommendations for firms to follow sustainable operations. This study also aims to stimulate further research within the area of sustainable logistics operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The reasons why it is important to implement sustainability into supply chain operations is discussed. Based on a review of the extant literature, various areas within the logistics function where sustainability can be implemented are then presented. Some short‐term and long‐term recommendations for the successful implementation of sustainability in the logistics function of supply chains are provided.

Findings

There has been very little work done to understand the role and importance of logistics in an organization's quest towards sustainability. For firms to implement a sustainability strategy in their supply chain operations, the logistics function needs to play a prominent role because of the magnitude of costs involved and the opportunity to identify and eliminate inefficiencies and reduce the carbon footprint.

Practical implications

Firms in their quest for sustainable logistics operations must start early and start simple. A top management commitment is required for such efforts to be successful. Also, firms need to be able to visualize and map out their supply chains and benchmark their sustainability efforts with other firms in their industry.

Social implications

Firms need to follow sustainable practices in their overall operations and in their logistics operations in particular because not only does it have financial and other intangible benefits, but it is also the right thing to do. Firms have a great social responsibility especially with respect to use of non‐renewable sources of energy and materials and also with respect to how their products are used and handled once they reach the end of their life cycles.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind which examines the state of sustainability within the field of supply chain logistics operations and identifies areas and sets the agenda for future research in this field.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Book part

Katrin Molina-Besch and Henrik Pålsson

For packed products, packaging affects every logistical activity and thus the overall economic and ecological efficiency (eco-efficiency) of supply chains. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

For packed products, packaging affects every logistical activity and thus the overall economic and ecological efficiency (eco-efficiency) of supply chains. The purpose of this research is to explore how integrated approaches are used in packaging development processes to increase eco-efficiency along supply chains and how a set of pre-selected factors influences the adoption of practically integrated approaches within companies.

Methodology/approach

The research approach is explorative and based on nine cases in the food and manufacturing industries in Sweden. In total, 26 semi-structured interviews were conducted.

Findings

The chapter describes the way in which companies work with ‘integrative’ packaging development process elements. It explores how four factors – product characteristics, packaging requirements, logistical conditions and environmental efforts – influence their approach.

Research limitations/implications

The study analyses the packaging development processes at a limited number of companies in Sweden.

Practical implications

The findings can help logistics managers to better understand how integrated approaches can be applied in packaging development processes to increase eco-efficiency of logistical processes along the supply chain. The study provides logistic managers also with information about which influencing factors can serve as facilitators or barriers to these approaches in their organisations.

Originality/value

Previous research has demonstrated the potential economic and environmental benefits of integrating a logistics perspective into the packaging development process. This study complements existing knowledge by presenting extensive empirical data on the practical application of integrated approaches in packaging development processes in industry.

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Article

David Hutchinson, Jang Singh and Kent Walker

The purpose of this paper is to describe a Canadian corporation's implementation and application of a sustainable business operation and model. It is based upon a case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a Canadian corporation's implementation and application of a sustainable business operation and model. It is based upon a case study of an International Canadian coffee and donut chain: Tim Hortons.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through: extensive publications of corporate documents, observations of actual operations at retail sites and social media sites.

Findings

The paper finds that Tim Hortons has clearly made progress toward greater sustainability. However, its program often lacks specificity, particularly in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. Within a visibly and highly polluting industry Tim Hortons sustainability program is a step in the right direction but there are areas in need of improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study paradoxically suggest that it is difficult for a company in the fast food industry to truly become sustainable given certain characteristics of the industry (disposal food and beverage containers, and drive‐thrus for example), yet sustainability is also imperative to business success and competitiveness.

Practical implications

Through a detailed examination of Tim Hortons' sustainable business approach the authors delineate a number of areas where the company can improve its sustainability. The paper also discusses areas of difficulty (e.g. drive‐thrus) and areas in need of improvement (e.g. a detailed description of the sources of the company's greenhouse‐gas emissions).

Social implications

Tim Hortons' sustainability program was only recently launched, and although the motivations behind the program are not discussed, it was not developed in response to any government subsidies or legislation.

Originality/value

The main contributions are as follows. First, the authors methodically analyze the sustainable business approach of a Canadian fast‐food company including but not limited to its value‐added process, driving forces, and purchasing policies. This provides a beginning for others who wish to implement sustainability into an industry not known for its environmental responsibility. Second, the authors suggest ways that Tim Hortons could improve its sustainable business approach. Third, the authors provide a case study of how an iconic Canadian company with revenues over $2.5 billion and nearly 4,000 stores across the globe has begun to implement sustainability into its core strategic approach.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article

Henrique Ewbank, José Arnaldo Frutuoso Roveda, Sandra Regina Monteiro Masalskiene Roveda, Admilson ĺrio Ribeiro, Adriano Bressane, Abdollah Hadi-Vencheh and Peter Wanke

The purpose of this paper is to analyze demand forecast strategies to support a more sustainable management in a pallet supply chain, and thus avoid environmental impacts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze demand forecast strategies to support a more sustainable management in a pallet supply chain, and thus avoid environmental impacts, such as reducing the consumption of forest resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Since the producer presents several uncertainties regarding its demand logs, a methodology that embed zero-inflated intelligence is proposed combining fuzzy time series with clustering techniques, in order to deal with an excessive count of zeros.

Findings

A comparison with other models from literature is performed. As a result, the strategy that considered at the same time the excess of zeros and low demands provided the best performance, and thus it can be considered a promising approach, particularly for sustainable supply chains where resources consumption is significant and exist a huge variation in demand over time.

Originality/value

The findings of the study contribute to the knowledge of the managers and policymakers in achieving sustainable supply chain management. The results provide the important concepts regarding the sustainability of supply chain using fuzzy time series and clustering techniques.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article

Anchal Gupta and Rajesh Kumar Singh

The purpose of this study is to analyze sustainability issues in the context of logistics service providers (LSPs) and to evaluate the sustainability index of an LSP in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze sustainability issues in the context of logistics service providers (LSPs) and to evaluate the sustainability index of an LSP in the Indian scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method is used to understand the sustainability issues of an Indian LSP. The situation–actor–process (SAP) and learning–action–performance (LAP) framework has been applied to critically examine the sustainability issues of the case organization. The information about the case study is collected from both primary and secondary sources, and a detailed analysis of different sustainability issues in the context of an Indian case has been done. The sustainability index for the case organization has been also evaluated.

Findings

It can be observed from the in-depth case analysis that LSPs have started making use of green practices for long-term sustainability, but adoption is very slow in developing countries such as India. Based on SAP-LAP analysis of an Indian LSP, suitable actions are recommended for improving the performance of LSPs.

Practical implications

Adoption of sustainable practices by LSPs can lead to sustainable performance. Sustainability index can assist LSPs to benchmark their sustainability performance to meet the market requirements.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study is to analyze the issues related to implementation of sustainable practices in an Indian LSP through SAP-LAP framework. It also illustrates the evaluation of sustainability index.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Integrated Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-561-0

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Article

Patrick Rigot-Muller, Chandra Lalwani, John Mangan, Orla Gregory and David Gibbs

– The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an optimisation method, and resulting insights, for minimising total logistics-related carbon emissions for end-to-end supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an optimisation method, and resulting insights, for minimising total logistics-related carbon emissions for end-to-end supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on two real-life UK industrial cases. For the first case, several alternative realistic routes towards the UK are analysed and the optimal route minimising total carbon emissions is identified and tested in real conditions. For the second case, emissions towards several destinations are calculated and two alternative routes to southern Europe are compared, using several transport modes (road, Ro-Ro, rail and maritime). An adapted Value Stream Mapping (VSM) approach is used to map carbon footprint and calculate emissions; in addition Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) data provided information for vessel specification allowing the use of more accurate emission factors for each shipping leg.

Findings

The analysis of the first case demonstrates that end-to-end logistics-related carbon emissions can be reduced by 16-21 per cent through direct delivery to the UK as opposed to transhipment via a Continental European port. The analysis of the second case shows that deliveries to southern Europe have the highest potential for reduction through deliveries by sea. Both cases show that for distant overseas destinations, the maritime leg represents the major contributor to CO2 emissions in the end-to-end supply chain. It is notable that one of the main apportionment approaches (that of Defra in the UK) generate higher carbon footprints for routes using Ro-Pax vessels, making those not optimal. The feasibility of the optimal route was demonstrated with real-life data.

Originality/value

This research used real-life data from two UK companies and highlighted where carbon emissions are generated in the inbound and outbound transport chain, and how these can be reduced.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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