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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Bifeng Zhu, Chufan Zhu and Bart Dewancker

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the way to achieve the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Through the introduction and learning of a specific case, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the way to achieve the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Through the introduction and learning of a specific case, this paper summarizes the specific process of green campus’s development and construction and directly discusses how to achieve the goal of sustainable development. By analyzing the achievements and measures of its construction, on the one hand, the experience and shortcomings of its green campus construction are summarized; on the other hand, the impact of Stanford’s own green campus construction on the local community is discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes Stanford, one of the best green campuses assessed by sustainability tracking, assessment and rating system (STARS), as a case study in three steps. First, it introduces the academics, energy supply and demand, water and land, waste, management, food and living, buildings and transportation of its campus construction in detail; second, it uses the STARS to make a comprehensive sustainable evaluation of Stanford; finally, it discusses the development relationship between Stanford and local community.

Findings

The four characteristics of its green campus development model are summarized, namely, based on its own scientific research; from the aspect of environmental friendliness; to achieve joint participation; and forming complementary development with the community. The construction of green campus has changed from a single triangle framework composed of SDGs, STARS and universities to a compound triangle framework composed of SDGs, universities and communities on the existing basis, greatly expanding the way to realize SDGs.

Practical implications

This development mode will have direct guiding significance for the sustainable construction of other campuses.

Social implications

This paper also discusses the development concept from green campus to sustainable community to provide positive reference to achieve the global SDGs from the perspective of colleges and universities.

Originality/value

According to the historical track of its development, this paper combines the two (SDGs and green campus) to discuss by using campus construction as an effective way to achieve the SDGs. On the basis of literature research and case study, STARS sustainable assessment is introduced. This will lead to quantitative analysis of sustainable construction in the discussion of the specific case, judging the specific sustainable degree of all aspects of campus construction, to provide a scientific basis for summarizing its characteristics of development mode.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Janaina Mazutti, Luciana Londero Brandli, Amanda Lange Salvia, Bárbara Maria Fritzen Gomes, Luana Inês Damke, Vanessa Tibola da Rocha and Roberto dos Santos Rabello

Higher education institutions are widely known both for their promotion to education for sustainable development (ESD) and for their contribution as living labs to urban…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions are widely known both for their promotion to education for sustainable development (ESD) and for their contribution as living labs to urban management strategies. As for strategies, smart and learning campuses have recently gained significant attention. This paper aims to report an air quality monitoring experience with focus on the smart and learning campus and discuss its implications for the university context with regard to ESD and sustainable development goal (SDG) integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The air quality monitoring was held at the main campus of University of Passo Fundo and focused on three pollutants directly related to vehicle emissions. The air quality index (AQI) was presented on a website, along with information regarding health problems caused by air pollution, main sources of emissions and strategies to reduce it.

Findings

The results showed how the decrease in air quality is related to the traffic emissions and the fact that exposing students to a smart and learning environment could teach them about sustainability education.

Practical implications

This case study demonstrated how monitoring air quality in a smart environment could highlight and communicate the impact of urban mobility on air quality and alerted to the need for more sustainable choices, including transports.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by showing the potential of a smart-learning campus integration and its contribution towards the ESD and the UN SDGs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Erin A. Hopkins

The focus of this paper is on environmental protection, specifically within the context of green building at institutions of higher education (IHEs). One major reason why…

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1409

Abstract

Purpose

The focus of this paper is on environmental protection, specifically within the context of green building at institutions of higher education (IHEs). One major reason why many IHEs are not undertaking sustainable building policies is the barriers to adoption. The lack of efficiency caused by these barriers to adoption of campus green building will be examined. The purpose of this paper is to identify the common barriers to adoption of green building initiatives at IHEs from multiple stakeholder perspectives and propose possible solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The manuscript provides a general review of the lack of efficiency caused by the barriers to adoption of sustainable building policies at tertiary education institutions.

Findings

Campus sustainable building policies face various barriers to adoption of green building policies. Campus sustainable building policies face various barriers to adoption. These include lack of awareness among many stakeholders, incentives, champions, understanding of financial considerations, and occupant satisfaction. These barriers can be addressed through review of student perceptions, encouraging knowledge gains at larger wealthier IHEs, campus planning, offering financial motivations, employing a campus sustainability officer, and marketing green campus building initiatives. However, every stakeholder needs to be part of the collaboration and incentivized in order to reduce these barriers.

Practical implications

This manuscript should be helpful to campus community members as they are involved in crafting, implementing, and managing green building policies. As green building development is a contemporary issue among the higher education sector, this research should prove helpful to decision makers as it identifies barriers and solutions to these barriers. Furthermore, this research can assist practitioners when attempting to implement green building policies at their respective IHEs by helping them understand the barriers as well as potential solutions for these barriers to campus green building.

Originality/value

This general review uncovers barriers to green building in the higher education sector; a sector which historically is dearth on green building research. Furthermore, solutions are offered to address and overcome these barriers from multiple stakeholder perspectives within this sector.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Irina Safitri Zen

The paper aims to explore and analyse the potential of campus living learning laboratory (LLL) as an integrated mechanism to provide the innovative and creative teaching…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore and analyse the potential of campus living learning laboratory (LLL) as an integrated mechanism to provide the innovative and creative teaching and learning experiences, robust research output and strengthening the campus sustainability initiatives by using the sustainability science approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The challenge to adopt sustainability science as an interdisciplinary approach juxtaposed against the structure, teaching and learning of single disciplinary approach in institution of higher education (IHE). The LLL approach can be one of the options on how the integrative teaching and learning, combination fundamental and applied research and campus operations should conduct to strengthen the implementation of campus sustainability.

Findings

The review of application of LLL from several campus sustainability and combining with the experiences in conducting the UTM Campus sustainability results the strategic operational mechanism of the integration process.

Research limitations/implications

The LLL approach which applies the sustainability science approach did not cover the challenges and issue related to the inter-, inter- and trans-disciplinary during the campus LLL application. Further study needs to be conducted to strengthen the fundamental approach to developing campus LLL as one approach to operationalizing the Sustainable Development agenda in IHE.

Practical implications

The experiences and findings produces from this study help other campus sustainability to articulate the benefits of campus LLL initiatives, anticipate implementation challenges in teaching and learning, research output and the operation. The problem-solving nature of sustainability science provides a platform for implementing campus sustainability initiatives which allow inter-, inter- and trans-disciplinary approach for a more synergize effort of a real case study and project based approach.

Social implications

Furthermore, the implementation of LLL challenges the researcher/academia to provide prompt response as part of societal learning process in strengthening applied-based research as well as to contribute to the fundamental research. Successful LLL approach require both top-down commitments from the top management of the university and bottom-up drive from interested faculty, core research themes, operations and students.

Originality/value

The integrative framework and operational mechanism to operate LLL in campus sustainability which resulted from the analysis taken from several universities that implement campus sustainability is the origin values of significant contribution from this study.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Gregory Cogut, Noah J. Webster, Robert W. Marans and John Callewaert

Sustainability literature has cited the influential role of both awareness and engagement in facilitating increases in pro-environmental behaviors. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability literature has cited the influential role of both awareness and engagement in facilitating increases in pro-environmental behaviors. The purpose of this study is to compare these links across behaviors and explore their interactive influence.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research questions were examined: 1) Is awareness about campus efforts regarding waste-prevention and sustainable travel/transportation options associated with increases in student waste-prevention and sustainable travel/transportation behaviors? 2) Is the link between sustainability awareness and changes in behavior conditioned by student engagement (i.e. participation) in campus sustainability activities and events? Research questions were examined using data from the University of Michigan Sustainability Cultural Indicators Program. A sample of freshmen completed a Web-based survey in 2012, and again as seniors in 2015.

Findings

Greater awareness of campus waste-prevention efforts in 2015 was associated with significant increases in student waste-prevention behaviors from 2012 to 2015. Also, among students who were engaged (i.e. reported participating in a campus sustainability activity/event), greater travel/transportation awareness in 2015 was associated with a significant decline in sustainable travel/transportation behavior. Consistent with previous studies this study found a link between sustainability awareness and increases in sustainable behavior. However, this study also indicates that this link is not present for all behaviors (i.e. use of sustainable travel/transportation). This study also found that engagement does not amplify the awareness–behavior link.

Originality/value

Understanding key drivers of changes in sustainable behavior for specific behaviors can inform the allocation of resources and help university campuses reach their sustainability goals.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Sandra Murray, Corey Peterson, Carmen Primo, Catherine Elliott, Margaret Otlowski, Stuart Auckland and Katherine Kent

Food insecurity and poor access to healthy food is known to compromise tertiary studies in university students, and food choices are linked to student perceptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Food insecurity and poor access to healthy food is known to compromise tertiary studies in university students, and food choices are linked to student perceptions of the campus food environment. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence, demographic and education characteristics associated with food insecurity in a sample of Australian university students and their satisfaction with on-campus food choices.

Design/methodology/approach

An online, cross-sectional survey conducted as part of the bi-annual sustainability themed survey was conducted at the University of Tasmania in March 2020. A single-item measure was used to assess food insecurity in addition to six demographic and education characteristics and four questions about the availability of food, affordable food, sustainable food and local food on campus.

Findings

Survey data (n =1,858) were analysed using bivariate analyses and multivariate binary logistic regression. A total of 38% of respondents (70% female; 80% domestic student; 42% aged 18–24 years) were food insecure. Overall, 41% of students were satisfied with the food available on campus. Nearly, half (47%) of food insecure students were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the availability of affordable food on campus. A minority of students were satisfied with the availability of sustainable food (37%) and local food (33%) on campus.

Originality/value

These findings demonstrate a high prevalence of food insecurity and deficits in the university food environment, which can inform the development of strategies to improve the food available on campus, including affordable, sustainable and local options.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Jessica Finlay and Jennifer Massey

The purpose of this paper is to argue that Richard Register's ecocity model offers a strategic framework to help guide sustainability initiatives in North American higher…

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6611

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that Richard Register's ecocity model offers a strategic framework to help guide sustainability initiatives in North American higher education (HE) institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper examines the theory of the ecocity and investigates the implications for its proposed building strategies for university and colleges, as institutions seek to create more sustainable campuses. The paper examines previous efforts to achieve sustainability and how the concept of the eco‐campus can be practically and productively applied.

Findings

There is no single campus that has fully embraced every facet of sustainability, but numerous HE institutions are strong leaders in diverse areas. The eco‐campus model provides concrete principles that proactively address HE institutions' ecological footprints and develops sustainable community practices.

Social implications

Sustainability is a pressing social issue. As world leaders in research, innovation, and education, universities and colleges are key places to address this global issue and foster progressive action within current and future generations. The eco‐campus approach represents an opportunity to initiate a cultural paradigm shift, whereby university and colleges become global leaders in sustainability.

Originality/value

While sustainability is now a cornerstone of research and teaching, North American HE institutions are faced with the challenge of realigning institutional practices, processes and resources to fully institute sustainability on campus. The eco‐campus model provides an innovative guide around which to hinge the development of sustainable institutional practices, structure progressive action, and foster meaningful change.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Amy Shaw, Teresa Capetola, Justin T. Lawson, Claire Henderson-Wilson and Berni Murphy

This study aims to investigate the sustainability of the food culture at Deakin University and to determine what the barriers to increasing the sustainability of food on…

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1523

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the sustainability of the food culture at Deakin University and to determine what the barriers to increasing the sustainability of food on the Burwood campus may be.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of staff and students from the Faculty of Health at the Burwood campus of Deakin University (n = 697) was undertaken. The survey included questions relating to eating habits on campus, views on the current food culture, food security, food disposal, visions for the future and demographic information. In addition, a short paper-based survey was developed for the ten food outlets on campus.

Findings

The results show that although sustainability considerations are important to staff and students, cost is the main issue and is a significant barrier to the development of a more sustainable food culture. It is also a significant barrier to staff and students making healthy choices when it comes to the purchase of food on campus. However, sustainable food initiatives such as community gardens could help alleviate this barrier and also contribute to improving student engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The online survey was limited to the Faculty of Health, and, therefore, a potential bias exists towards individuals who may have an interest in health. This should be considered when interpreting the results.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates that although cost may be a barrier to universities improving the sustainability of their food culture, there are other ways in which universities can create an environment that embraces sustainable food production to benefit both the environment and the university community.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Şiir Kılkış

Despite an emerging trend in the higher education sector toward sustainable campuses, comparative analyses that span multiple themes across multiple campuses are still…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an emerging trend in the higher education sector toward sustainable campuses, comparative analyses that span multiple themes across multiple campuses are still limited. The purpose of this paper is to reduce such a gap by comparing universities that are members of the International Sustainable Campus Network across themes that are related to environmental quality.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 34 universities are included in the sample. Indicators are systematically reviewed and clustered into ten themes. Common indicators (CIs) are identified in seven themes for at least seven and at most 20 campuses. At the absence of CIs, the given theme is assessed based on the measures applied. The results indicate the average levels of performance in the sample and/or the scope of the measures that are undertaken.

Findings

According to related values, an average campus spent 233,402 MWh of energy in buildings, 838,317 m3 of water on campus, generated 4,442 tonnes of waste, and emitted 75,354 tonnes of CO2 emissions. The average recycling rate was 50 percent, the average single occupancy vehicle rate in campus commuting was 34 percent, and on average, there were 152 sustainability-oriented courses. Best practices from the measures included energy audits for data centers, retrofit of water intense laboratories, and on-site renewable energy projects.

Originality/value

In addition, a unified monitoring framework is proposed to improve subsequent comparative analyses of campuses. Universities must focus on the use of the campus as a living laboratory to guide society toward a more sustainable future.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Michelle Horhota, Jenni Asman, Jeanine P. Stratton and Angela C. Halfacre

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the behavioral barriers to sustainable action in a campus community.

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1980

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the behavioral barriers to sustainable action in a campus community.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports three different methodological approaches to the assessment of behavioral barriers to sustainable actions on a college campus. Focus groups and surveys were used to assess campus members’ opinions about the barriers that limit sustainable behaviors on campus. After identifying general barriers, behavioral assessment was used to assess specific barriers to energy conservation in a target location on campus and to develop an intervention to reduce energy use for that location.

Findings

Across methodologies, four key behavioral barriers to sustainable actions were consistently reported: communication/awareness, inconvenience, financial concerns and lack of engagement. The intervention that was developed targeted the barriers of communication issues and lack of awareness and resulted in reduced energy use for a target campus location.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the value of assessing barriers to ongoing sustainability efforts using multiple methods and using this information to develop an intervention to foster behavioral change. The paper also highlights strategies that have been implemented to address some of the barriers which were identified.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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