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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Amélia Brandão and Ana Gonçalves da Costa

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

Abstract

Purpose

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

Design/methodology/approach

Existing studies have mainly adopted a qualitative methodology for identifying barriers to uptake of SFC, this study uses six of the main identified barriers: environmental apparel knowledge, perceived value, price sensitivity, product attributes and variety, availability and scepticism into the TPB framework to test and reveal which barriers have the greater impact on the TPB cognitions and consequently on building intention towards SFC. To test this model a survey study among 669 consumers from Europe, Asian and North America was conducted, structural equation modelling is used to test the research hypothesis.

Findings

Findings confirm the role of TPB cognitions on predicting intention and show that the proposed barriers provide a satisfactory explanation of the TPB model. Furthermore, results show that product attributes and variety and environmental apparel knowledge have the greatest impact on the TPB cognitions and on building intention towards SFC. Differences were found between the impacts of the price for the three continents.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the emerging sustainable fashion literature by examining the impact of different barriers to SFC in an extended TPB framework. To the best of our knowledge price sensitivity, availability and scepticism have never been studied in the context of sustainable fashion. It also provides a multifactor group analysis which uncovers differences among consumers from different continents.

Details

European Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Manita Matharu, Ruchi Jain and Shampy Kamboj

The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential determinants of sustainable consumption behavior. This study describes lifestyle of health and sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential determinants of sustainable consumption behavior. This study describes lifestyle of health and sustainability (LOHAS) tendency and the effects of such lifestyles on the behavioral intentions for sustainable consumption in sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adapts LOHAS tendency, consumer attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and consumers' behavioral intention for sustainable consumption scale in Indian context to describe the sustainable consumption behavior by extending the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Data of 627 individuals collected through a questionnaire, after the scales validation process and thereafter a structural equation analysis has been performed.

Findings

The findings confirm the extended TPB, wherein LOHAS tendency has emerged as an antecedent to consumer attitudes for taking part in sustainable consumption. Results highlight that consumer attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control are significant determining factors of consumers' sustainable consumption behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This study has examined the sustainable consumption behavior by considering the lifestyle tendency. A few other limitations are also discussed.

Originality/value

Consumer behavior in sharing economy is surely one of the emerging research areas; there is dearth of research to understand Indian consumers' sustainable consumption, particularly from lifestyle perspective. This research establishes relationship between LOHAS tendency and sustainable consumption, which may serve as a contributor to sharing economy in terms of LOHAS consumer's lifestyle and their sustainable consumption behavior.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Monika Sheoran and Divesh Kumar

The consumption patterns of humanity are putting an enormous burden on the resources, which are beyond the fulfiling capacity of the earth. These consumption patterns need…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumption patterns of humanity are putting an enormous burden on the resources, which are beyond the fulfiling capacity of the earth. These consumption patterns need to be made sustainable. Therefore, this study aims to focus on identifying the key enablers driving the sustainable consumer behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review of 107 studies (1995 to 2018), which were published over a period of 23 years, fourteen key enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour were identified. These 14 enablers were validated with the help of empirical research done by surveying 200 consumers of electronic products. This was followed by the application of interpretive structural modelling (ISM) technique, to get an insight into how these enablers are influencing sustainable consumer behaviour.

Findings

ISM technique and empirical research aided in classifying the enablers based on their driving and dependence power. A further analysis was done to know about the contextual relationship between all 14 enablers and how these enablers are influencing each other and sustainable consumer behaviour. Attitude, subjective norm and perceived controlled behaviour were found dependent variables while education, government policy and advertisement emerged as an autonomous variable.

Research limitations/implications

This study will be helpful for future research in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour. Through understanding of the enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour, a scale can be developed having significant theoretical and managerial implications. This study may help in improving the sustainability initiatives by various stakeholders involved in the process of purchase, usage and dispose of electronic products.

Originality/value

This study is the first temporal and spatial study, which includes a holistic view of the enablers of sustainable consumer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2019

Gregory Cogut, Noah J. Webster, Robert W. Marans and John Callewaert

Sustainability literature has cited the influential role of both awareness and engagement in facilitating increases in pro-environmental behaviors. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability literature has cited the influential role of both awareness and engagement in facilitating increases in pro-environmental behaviors. The purpose of this study is to compare these links across behaviors and explore their interactive influence.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research questions were examined: 1) Is awareness about campus efforts regarding waste-prevention and sustainable travel/transportation options associated with increases in student waste-prevention and sustainable travel/transportation behaviors? 2) Is the link between sustainability awareness and changes in behavior conditioned by student engagement (i.e. participation) in campus sustainability activities and events? Research questions were examined using data from the University of Michigan Sustainability Cultural Indicators Program. A sample of freshmen completed a Web-based survey in 2012, and again as seniors in 2015.

Findings

Greater awareness of campus waste-prevention efforts in 2015 was associated with significant increases in student waste-prevention behaviors from 2012 to 2015. Also, among students who were engaged (i.e. reported participating in a campus sustainability activity/event), greater travel/transportation awareness in 2015 was associated with a significant decline in sustainable travel/transportation behavior. Consistent with previous studies this study found a link between sustainability awareness and increases in sustainable behavior. However, this study also indicates that this link is not present for all behaviors (i.e. use of sustainable travel/transportation). This study also found that engagement does not amplify the awareness–behavior link.

Originality/value

Understanding key drivers of changes in sustainable behavior for specific behaviors can inform the allocation of resources and help university campuses reach their sustainability goals.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Daniel Fischer, Tina Böhme and Sonja Maria Geiger

Promoting sustainable consumption among young consumers has become a key priority on the research agenda in such different fields as education for sustainable development…

Abstract

Purpose

Promoting sustainable consumption among young consumers has become a key priority on the research agenda in such different fields as education for sustainable development, environmental psychology and consumer policy. Progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of sophisticated research instruments capable of measuring consumption behaviors that are relevant both in terms of their sustainability impacts and their suitability for teenagers. This study aims to address this research gap and presents a scale for young consumers’ sustainable consumption behaviors (YCSCB) in the areas of food and clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale was developed in a two-step, mixed-methods approach. In an initial qualitative interview study, the actual behaviors of theoretically selected young consumers (n = 8) were identified with regard to acquiring, using and disposing of consumer goods in the areas of food and clothing. The YCSCB scale was constructed using the findings of this qualitative study and then validated in a subsequent quantitative study (n = 155).

Findings

The YCSCB scale is a valid and reliable scale to measure young consumers’ sustainable consumption behavior in the areas of food (n = 14 items) and clothing (n = 13 items).

Originality/value

The findings of this research provide a twofold contribution to advancing research on YCSCB. Firstly, it presents a consolidated scale that is explicitly constructed for teenagers and their consumption contexts. Secondly, it proposes a heuristic for developing more sophisticated measurements of SCB among young consumers that would allow a comparison between studies, is focused on behaviors (instead of confounding behaviors with intentions, attitudes or values) and is impact-oriented in terms of sustainability relevance.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Joonwhan David Lee, Angelica Bahl, Gregory S. Black, Darrin C. Duber-Smith and Nicole S. Vowles

Using broad definitions of sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior, identifying key elements of these types of consumer behavior and differentiating between…

Abstract

Purpose

Using broad definitions of sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior, identifying key elements of these types of consumer behavior and differentiating between spirituality and religiosity, the purpose of this study is to develop and test a research model.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to identify elements of the research constructs. Literature on sustainable business practices was particularly important. Once elements were identified, measures used in previous consumer behavior research were used to collect data from 116 undergraduate students enrolled in marketing and management classes at a major university located in the southwestern USA.

Findings

Results indicate that the level of a consumer’s spirituality affects both sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior. In addition, the model predicts that the level of a consumer’s religiosity has no impact on non-sustainable consumer behavior, and this prediction is verified by the study results.

Practical implications

As it is important for businesses to conduct sustainable business practices, it may also be beneficial to consumers to practice sustainable behavior. A significant predictor of this sustainable consumer behavior is spirituality, and it is important to distinguish spirituality from religiosity.

Originality/value

Sustainable consumer behavior is more thoroughly described. Also, religiosity and spirituality are delineated. Finally, for the first time, the separate and distinct impact of religiosity and spirituality on sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior is assessed.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Mastura Ab. Wahab

The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent religious work values such as Islamic work values (IWVs) could have an influence on sustainable work behaviours and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent religious work values such as Islamic work values (IWVs) could have an influence on sustainable work behaviours and sustainable energy consumptions among employees in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through survey questionnaires. The sample consisted of 264 Muslim employees who work in the private and public organisations in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling was conducted using a second-order model.

Findings

The results showed that religious values (i.e. IWVs) have a significant relationship with sustainable work behaviours and sustainable energy consumptions. The effect on sustainable work behaviours was stronger than its effect on sustainable energy consumptions.

Practical implications

This study suggests that the policy makers and pundits should pay attention to employees rather than focussing on just the CEO or the managers as the key players in the industries. This would help reduce the emissions of greenhouse gasses and other environmental degradations.

Originality/value

With regard to sustainability, past studies have mostly used general values rather than religious values in analysing work behaviours or energy consumptions. Furthermore, most previous studies have used behavioural intentions in their theory and concepts when explaining sustainable behaviours. This study extends the literature by conceptualising the value-attitude-behaviour theory which focusses on actual behaviours rather than on intentions in explaining the effect of religious work values on sustainable behaviours and energy consumptions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Monika Sheoran and Divesh Kumar

The earth is under massive stress due to current level of consumption which has crossed the sustaining capacity of our planet. Thus, the need of the hour is to promote…

Abstract

Purpose

The earth is under massive stress due to current level of consumption which has crossed the sustaining capacity of our planet. Thus, the need of the hour is to promote sustainable production and consumption. The purpose of this study is to identify the basic barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour which are hindering the adoption of sustainable consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is divided into two parts. The first part consists of a literature review based on 128 articles (1995 to 2020), which are spread over a period of 25 years. Based on the literature review, nine barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour were identified and put into three categories. In the second part, fuzzy analytical hierarchy process has been used to know about the relative weight of each barrier so that benchmarking/prioritising of basic barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour can be done.

Findings

This article identifies critical barriers affecting the acceptance of sustainable electronic products. High price, a perception of no environmental impact, no benefit in personal image, lesser use by family and friends, lack of awareness about the products etc. emerged as the potential barriers which need prime attention. The relative weight of each of these barriers has also been arrived at in this article which is expected to be beneficial for policymakers to focus upon important barriers. Impact of many of these barriers can be reduced through innovative approaches and solutions.

Research limitations/implications

This article will be helpful in future research in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour. Through the understanding of the barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour, companies, governments and industries can take suitable initiatives by modifying the policies and practices to reduce the impact of these barriers so that consumer behaviour can be made more sustainable.

Originality/value

The current article tries to identify the critical barriers to adoption of sustainable electronic products by the consumers. An extensive literature review, expert suggestions and consumer survey have been adopted to identify nine barriers. Although, multiple researches have been done in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour and adoption of sustainable electronic products, there is no research article which solely focuses on implementing Fuzzy analytical hierarchical process (AHP) approach to rank the barriers faced by consumers for adoption of sustainable electronic products. It has been concluded that high price of sustainable electronic products is the most critical barrier in adoption of sustainable consumer behaviour. Moreover, the relative ranking obtained with the help of Fuzzy AHP can be used by policymakers and organisations to promote and implement sustainability in consumer behaviour.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Diego Costa Pinto, Márcia Maurer Herter, Patrícia Rossi, Walter Meucci Nique and Adilson Borges

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reconcile previous research that has provided mixed results regarding motivation for sustainable behaviors: pure altruism (cooperation) or competitive altruism (status). Drawing on evolutionary altruism and identity-based motivation, the authors propose that a match between pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) identity goals enhance consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling (green buying).

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies show how pure and competitive altruism are associated with specific sustainable consumption (Study 1) and how altruism types should be matched with identity goals to motivate sustainable consumption (Studies 2 and 3).

Findings

Study 1 shows that pure altruism is associated with recycling but not with green buying. Studies 2 and 3 show that pure (competitive) altruism and individualistic (collectivistic) goals lead to higher recycling (green buying) intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The present research extends previous findings by showing that pure and competitive are indeed associated with specific sustainable behaviors. The authors suggest that the interaction between motives and identity goals can lead to a greater impact on recycling and green buying intentions.

Practical implications

Public policymakers and companies will benefit by better understanding how specific combinations of altruism types and identity goals can foster recycling or green buying intentions.

Originality/value

This research is the first to show how matches between pure and competitive altruism types and individualistic and collectivistic identity goals affect consumers’ motivations to engage in recycling and green buying.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Evan K. Perrault and Scott K. Clark

A planet that can no longer sustain life is a frightening thought – and one that is often present in mass media messages. Therefore, this study aims to test the components…

Abstract

Purpose

A planet that can no longer sustain life is a frightening thought – and one that is often present in mass media messages. Therefore, this study aims to test the components of a classic fear appeal theory, the extended parallel process model (EPPM) and to determine how well its constructs predict sustainability behavioral intentions. This study also strove to uncover students’ motivations and attitudes that are not present in the EPPM.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 779 college students was conducted.

Findings

Results reveal that both threat and efficacy are significant predictors of behavioral intention, consistent with the EPPM. However, an analysis of open-ended comments reveals that subjective normative influence and incentives also play a key role in students performing future sustainable behaviors.

Practical implications

These findings provide a framework to educators and message designers of sustainability groups on college campuses highlighting the importance of including multiple constructs in their messages to students. Threatening messages will not be enough to increase behavioral intentions. Fear inducing messages must be combined with messages to increase self- and response efficacy. Education is also not the only piece of the puzzle. Students state difficulty in performing some sustainable behaviors as a key barrier, indicating a need to incorporate infrastructure changes at campuses to facilitate greater ease among students to act sustainably.

Originality value

This study tests the EPPM’s utility in helping to find the most effective ways to influence college students’ future behavioral intentions toward acting sustainably.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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