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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Susie Leigh and Karin Newman

Seeks to throw light on both strategic and managerial aspects of the post of medical director. The medical director is a key executive member of the Trust Board, yet the…

Abstract

Seeks to throw light on both strategic and managerial aspects of the post of medical director. The medical director is a key executive member of the Trust Board, yet the role remains ill‐defined. The existing published guidance gives some indication of what medical directors should be doing but gives limited information about “best practice” or how to cope with the demands being made on them. A survey of medical directors in 1994 revealed the diversity of the tasks that they can be called on to perform, often with inadequate managerial and secretarial support. The survey also indicated that problems have occurred as a result of the heavy workload and unexpected multiple facets of the role. Concludes that, to make the job somewhat easier, there should be a clear core job specification which is tailored to suit the individual circumstances. This should be combined with generous support and training, together with a suitable reward package.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Alan Cowling, Karin Newman and Susie Leigh

This paper focuses on the practice of evidence‐based healthcare by doctors, nurses, midwives and the professions allied to medicine in four NHS Trusts in and around…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the practice of evidence‐based healthcare by doctors, nurses, midwives and the professions allied to medicine in four NHS Trusts in and around London. This qualitative study, based on interviews and self‐efficiency ratings uncovered the extent of evidence based practice between different groups and between acute and community Trusts, the perceived obstacles to the adoption and implementation of EBHC, and throws light on the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for such practice. Five clusters of competencies were identified – personal attributes, interpersonal, self‐management, information management and technical knowledge skills – and these form the basis of a competency framework of measurable criteria to assess proficiency as well as staff training needs which it is hoped will enable NHS Trusts to devise strategies to meet the requirements and challenges of clinical governance from April 1999.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Janet L. Sims‐Wood

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the Afro‐American experience and to show the joys, sorrows, needs, and ideals of the Afro‐American woman as she struggles from day to day.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds

Abstract

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The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality for Women an Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-602-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Janice M. Bogstad

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified…

Abstract

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified the typical SF reader as male, between the ages of twelve and twenty and, in the case of adults, employed in some technical field. Yet I continually find myself having conversations with women, only to find that they, like myself, began reading science fiction between the ages of six and ten, have been reading it voraciously ever since, and were often frustrated at the absence of satisfying female characters and the presence of misogynistic elements in what they read. The stereotype of the male reader and the generally male SF environment mask both the increasing presence of women writers in the field of science fiction and the existence of a feminist dialog within some SF novels. This dialog had its beginnings in the mid‐sixties and is still going strong. It is the hope of the feminist SF community that this effacement can be counteracted.

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Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Daniel Briggs, Anthony Ellis, Anthony Lloyd and Luke Telford

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications of both the Covid-19 pandemic and UK lockdown for the social, political and economic future of the UK. Drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications of both the Covid-19 pandemic and UK lockdown for the social, political and economic future of the UK. Drawing on primary data obtained during the lockdown and the theoretical concepts of transcendental materialism and the “event”, the paper discusses the strength of participants' attachment to the “old normal” and their dreams of a “new normal”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises a semi-structured online survey (n = 305) with UK residents and Facebook forum debates collected during the lockdown period in the UK.

Findings

The findings in this paper suggest that while the lockdown suspended daily routines and provoked participants to reflect upon their consumption habits and the possibility of an alternative future, many of our respondents remained strongly attached to elements of pre-lockdown normality. Furthermore, the individual impetus for change was not matched by the structures and mechanisms holding up neoliberalism, as governments and commercial enterprises merely encouraged people to get back to the shops to spend.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is the strength and depth of empirical data into the Covid-19 pandemic, specifically the lockdown. Additionally, the synthesis of empirical data with the novel theoretical framework of transcendental materialism presents an original and unique perspective on Covid-19.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1924

OUR readers will, we trust, appreciate our double souvenir number issued in connection with the Library Association Conference at Glasgow. Special features are the…

Abstract

OUR readers will, we trust, appreciate our double souvenir number issued in connection with the Library Association Conference at Glasgow. Special features are the articles on the Mitchell Library, Glasgow, 1874–1924, by a member of the staff, Mr. J. Dunlop, and one on the Burns Country, by Mr. J. M. Leighton, of Greenock Public Library. We printed the provisional programme in our July issue and as we go to press have little to add to the particulars there given, except to compliment the Library Association and the Local Reception Committee on the excellent programme arranged for the occasion, from both the professional and social point of view.

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New Library World, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Arménio Rego and Miguel Pina e Cunha

The paper aims to study the impact of five dimensions of workplace spirituality (team's sense of community, alignment with organizational values, sense of contribution to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the impact of five dimensions of workplace spirituality (team's sense of community, alignment with organizational values, sense of contribution to society, enjoyment at work, opportunities for inner life) on affective, normative and continuance commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 361 individuals from 154 organizations were interviewed. Correlations, regressions and cluster analyses were carried out.

Findings

The five spirituality dimensions explain 48, 16 and 7 per cent of the unique variance of, respectively, the affective, normative and continuance forms of commitment. The findings suggest that when people experience workplace spirituality, they feel more affectively attached to their organizations, experience a sense of obligation/loyalty towards them, and feel less instrumentally committed.

Research limitations/implications

Dependent and independent variables were collected from the same source, simultaneously. This can produce the risk of common method variance, leading to an inflation of statistical relationships. Future studies may use a double source method. A longitudinal research design may also be suitable.

Practical implications

By improving spirituality climates, managers can promote organizational commitment and, thus, individual and organizational performance. It is likely that this occurs because people react reciprocally towards an organization that satisfies their spiritual needs, allows them to experience a sense of psychological safety, makes them feel that they are valued as human beings and that they deserve respectful treatment, and allows them to experience senses of purpose, self‐determination, enjoyment and belonging.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by filling a gap in the organization and management literature, in which empirical studies on organizational spirituality have been scarce until now.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Margaret McAllister, Donna Lee Brien, June Alexander and Trudi Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential benefits that books, and specifically memoirs, may offer mental health students, positing that first person…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential benefits that books, and specifically memoirs, may offer mental health students, positing that first person testimonials may make the complex experiences of a mental health challenge, in this case eating disorders (ED), accessible to learners.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a pedagogical approach, based on transformative learning (TL), to assist in encouraging the development of a Recovery Approach in students. TL is a pedagogy that is interested in problematic practices that keep afflicting an area such as mental health, such as the imbalanced focus on learning illness rather than wellbeing, and in pondering and revising the educational solutions.

Findings

The paper proposes that forward movement in this area will be based on considering and developing such innovative curricula, and researching its impact.

Originality/value

By virtue of their accessibility, memoirs could offer to a large audience the benefits of universality, empathy, hope and guidance. Teachers and learners could be making use of these books in face-to-face or online activities. This paper explores the groundwork that is needed before ED memoirs can be confidently recommended as an empowering tool.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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