Search results

1 – 2 of 2
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Jayaraman Chillayil, Suresh M., Viswanathan P.K., Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra and Sasi K. Kottayil

In the realm of energy behaviour studies, very little research has been done to understand industrial energy behaviour (IEB) that influences the willingness to adopt (WTA…

Abstract

Purpose

In the realm of energy behaviour studies, very little research has been done to understand industrial energy behaviour (IEB) that influences the willingness to adopt (WTA) energy-efficient measures. Most of the studies on energy behaviour were focused on the residential and commercial sectors where the behaviour under investigation was under volitional control, that is, where people believe that they can execute the behaviour whenever they are willing to do so. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing the industry’s intentions and behaviour that leads to enhanced adoption of energy efficiency measures recommended through energy audits. In particular, this paper aims to extend the existing behaviour intention models using the total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) method and expert feedback to develop an IEB model

Design/methodology/approach

TISM technique was used to determine the relationship between different elements of the behaviour. Responses were collected from experts in the field of energy efficiency to understand the relationship between identified factors, their driving power and dependency.

Findings

The results show that values, socialisation and leadership of individuals are the key driving factors in deciding the individual energy behaviour. WTA energy-saving measures recommended by an energy auditor are found to be highly dependent on the organisational policies such as energy policy, delegation of power to energy manager and life cycle cost evaluation in purchase policy.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a few limitations that warrant consideration in future research. First, the data came from a small sample of energy experts based on a convenience sample of Indian experts. This limits the generalizability of the results. Individual and organizational behaviour analysed in this study looked into a few select characteristics, derived from the literature review and expert feedback, which may pose questions about the standard for behaviours in different industries.

Practical implications

Reasons for non-adoption of energy audit recommendations are rarely shared by the industries and the analysis of individual and organisational behaviour through structured questionnaire and surveys have serious limitations. Under this circumstance, collecting expert feedback and using the TISM method to build an IEB model can help to build strategies to enhance the adoption of energy-efficient measures.

Social implications

Various policy level interventions and regulatory measures in the energy field, adopted across the globe, are found unsuccessful in narrowing the energy-efficiency gap, reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming. Understanding the key driving factors can help develop effective intervention strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions.

Originality/value

The industry energy behaviour model with driving, linking and dependent factors and factor hierarchy is a novel contribution to the theory of organisational behaviour. The model takes into consideration both the individual and organisational factors where the decision-making is not strictly under volitional control. Understanding the key driving factor of behaviour can help design an effective intervention strategy that addresses the barriers to energy efficiency improvement. The results imply that it is important to carry out post energy audit studies to understand the implementation rate of recommendations and also the individual and organisational factors that influence the WTA energy-saving measures.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Sougata Ray and Sushanta Mahapatra

The Indian microfinance industry witnessed one of the fastest growths in the recent times. However, the striking feature of this growth is that the Microfinance…

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian microfinance industry witnessed one of the fastest growths in the recent times. However, the striking feature of this growth is that the Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) are concentrated only in some specific regions of the country. There is a huge geographical skew in the distribution of the MFIs. In this paper, an attempt has been made to explain these geographical skew by using the macro variables of the states. The objective of the study is to identify the causes for this regional disparity in the growth of MFIs.

Design/methodology/approach

We try to explain the level of penetration of microfinance in the states by using regression models.

Findings

Our analysis suggests that state-level macro factors are significant in explaining the geographical skew. MFIs in India have concentrated in states which are richer, have good rural infrastructure, but lack in adequate banking facility, and have low human capital.

Originality/value

The study provides an insight which would help in framing the necessary regulations to ensure that MFIs operate in all regions of the country.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

1 – 2 of 2