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Article

Peggy Ng, Daisy Lee, Phoebe Wong and Regan Lam

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low…

Abstract

Purpose

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low susceptibility to online information. Our study addressed this gap by empirically demonstrating the role that students’ susceptibility to online information plays in terms of the effect of attitude, social norm and perceived behavioral control on their advice-seeking intention and behavior using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the susceptibility to online sources on students’ advice-seeking behavior when making an institution choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was involved, and this empirical study was performed on the basis of a sample of 621 students from publicly-funded high schools in Hong Kong. Multigroup analysis (MGA) was conducted to (i.e. students with high susceptibility to online sources/ students with low susceptibility to online sources) to examine students’ behavioral intention regarding advice seeking about institution choice. 10;

Findings

The results of the study revealed that students with high susceptibility to online information were likely to be influenced by the social norm in applying the TPB model. Conversely, students with low susceptibility to online information had low intention to seek advice from others as they are independent and noninformation seekers. Implications for higher education institutions are discussed.

Originality/value

This study provides a modified version of the TPB model while also demonstrating how students with high/low susceptibility to online sources affect their behavioral intention to seek advice from others about making a university choice. Also, this study provides insights into institutions regarding the promotion of marketing information via online and offline sources.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article

Mehdi Mourali, Michel Laroche and Frank Pons

Interpersonal influences play a major role in shaping consumer choice decisions. This is particularly evident in the case of services, where intangibility and variability…

Abstract

Purpose

Interpersonal influences play a major role in shaping consumer choice decisions. This is particularly evident in the case of services, where intangibility and variability add to the decision difficulty. While all consumers are susceptible to interpersonal influence, people differ in the extent of their susceptibility to interpersonal influence, with some individuals being chronically more susceptible to social influence than others. Seeks to speculate in this paper that, in addition to individual differences, susceptibility to interpersonal influence also varies systematically across cultures with varying degrees of individualism‐collectivism.

Design/methodolog/approach

Hypothesis is tested by investigating and comparing the structure, properties, and mean levels of the susceptibility to interpersonal influence scale across samples of French and English Canadian consumers.

Findings

It is found that: French Canadians are significantly more susceptible to normative influence than English Canadians; French Canadians score significantly lower than English Canadians on measures of individualism; and individualism has a significant negative effect on consumer susceptibility to normative influence.

Originality/value

By showing that French Canadians were indeed less individualistic than English Canadians, and that individualistic orientation had a significant negative effect on both the utilitarian and the value‐expressive dimensions of consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence, hopefully it has been demonstrated that differences in susceptibility to normative influence between French and English Canadians are partly driven by cultural differences in individualistic orientation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Denver D’Rozario and Pravat K. Choudhury

The impact of assimilation on a consumer’s susceptibility to interpersonal influence is assessed in samples of first‐generation Armenian and Chinese immigrants to the US…

Abstract

The impact of assimilation on a consumer’s susceptibility to interpersonal influence is assessed in samples of first‐generation Armenian and Chinese immigrants to the US. We find that: (a) Chinese immigrants are more susceptible to interpersonal influence than are Anglo‐Americans who in turn are more susceptible to this influence than are Armenian immigrants, (b) Chinese immigrants are especially susceptible to the normative type of interpersonal influence and (c) Chinese immigrants’ susceptibility to both types of interpersonal influence decreases significantly as they identificationally‐assimilate, whereas Armenian immigrants’ susceptibility to both types of interpersonal influence decreases significantly as they structurally‐assimilate into the Anglo‐American macro‐culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Nitin Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth, to test if there is a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth, to test if there is a relationship between these two constructs and identify the reason for the same.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to empirically test the given objectives, instruments to measure susceptibility to interpersonal influence as well as price sensitivity were developed by using inputs from the literature. Responses were elicited from a sample of Indian youth (between 16 to 25 years) residing in various Indian cities. Relevant statistical tools were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Indian youth showed high scores on their traditional consumer behavioral traits of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity. It was shown that susceptibility to interpersonal influence had a significant impact on the level of price sensitivity among Indian youth. Gender played a significant role in this relationship.

Practical implications

The results provide many interesting insights with respect to the consumer behavioral traits of Indian youth. These insights will enable managers to develop effective marketing‐mix strategies, which would cater to the requirements of the Indian youth population.

Originality/value

This is the only contemporary paper in the extant literature which measures the level of susceptibility to interpersonal influence and price sensitivity prevalent among Indian youth and which attempts to identify an empirical relationship among these important constructs.

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Article

Honghong Zhang and Xiushuang Gong

This study aims to empirically investigate how susceptibility to social influence in new product adoption varies with one’s structural location in a social network.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically investigate how susceptibility to social influence in new product adoption varies with one’s structural location in a social network.

Design/methodology/approach

The social network data were collected based on a sociometric network survey with 589 undergraduate students. Social network analysis and ordinary least squares regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study finds that consumers with high degree centrality (i.e. hubs) who have a large number of connections to others and consumers with high betweenness centrality (i.e. bridges) who connect otherwise distant groups in social networks are both less sensitive to informational influence from others. More importantly, the authors find evidence that consumers with moderate levels of degree/betweenness centrality are more susceptible to normative influence and status competition than those with low or high degree/betweenness centrality. The inverse-U patterns in the above relations are consistent with middle-status conformity and anxiety.

Research limitations/implications

This research complements social influence and new product diffusion research by documenting important contingencies (i.e. network locations) in consumer susceptibility to different types of social influence from a social network perspective.

Practical implications

The findings will assist marketers to leverage social influence by activating relevant social ties with effective messages in their network marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This research provides a better understanding of the mechanisms driving susceptibility to social influence in new product diffusion.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Zexin Ma, Xiaoli Nan, Irina A. Iles, James Butler, Robert Feldman and Min Qi Wang

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of self-affirmation on African American smokers' intentions to quit smoking sooner and desire to stop smoking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of self-affirmation on African American smokers' intentions to quit smoking sooner and desire to stop smoking altogether in response to viewing graphic cigarette warning labels. It also tested the mediating role of perceived susceptibility and self-efficacy in explaining the impact of self-affirmation.

Design/methodology/approach

African American smokers (N = 158) were recruited to participate in a controlled experiment. Participants first completed a short questionnaire about their demographic background and smoking-related attitudes and behavior. They were then randomly assigned to engage in either a self-affirmation task or a control task and viewed two graphic cigarette warning labels subsequently. Participants then responded to a questionnaire about their perceived susceptibility to smoking-related diseases, perceived self-efficacy to quit smoking, intentions to quit smoking and desire to stop smoking altogether.

Findings

Results showed that engaging in self-affirmation prior to exposure to graphic cigarette warning labels increased African American smokers' perceived susceptibility to smoking-related diseases, but decreased their perceived self-efficacy to quit smoking. Furthermore, self-affirmation indirectly enhanced smokers' intentions to quit smoking sooner and desire to stop smoking altogether through increased perceived susceptibility. It also had an unexpected negative indirect effect on intentions to quit smoking sooner through decreased self-efficacy.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that investigates the effect of self-affirmation on African American smokers' responses toward graphic cigarette warning labels.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Dennis N. Bristow and Brad Kleindl

This paper presents the results of a multimethod research study, which incorporates survey and experimental methodologies, designed to further explore the underpinnings of…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a multimethod research study, which incorporates survey and experimental methodologies, designed to further explore the underpinnings of cultural differences in consumer responses to advertising messages. The study was designed to measure and assess differences in the self‐esteem and susceptibility to social influence of Japanese and United States college‐aged consumers. In general, it was hypothesized that Japanese consumers would have lower self‐esteem and higher susceptibility to social influence than would their US counterparts. The study provided evidence to support those hypotheses.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article

Bishnu Sharma, Maria Raciti, Rebecca O'Hara, Karin Reinhard and Fiona Davies

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived susceptibility to alcohol retailers' sales promotion strategies and young, female university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived susceptibility to alcohol retailers' sales promotion strategies and young, female university students' intention to buy alcohol and attitude towards alcohol consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a convenience sample of three universities in three OECD countries with high alcohol consumption per capita: Australia (n=305), Germany (n=323) and Wales (n=361). A self‐administered survey approach was used to collect data from female university students between the ages of 18 and 24 years in one university in each country. The four alcohol sales promotion strategies of interest were price reductions, quantity specials whereby the more you buy the less you pay on a pro rata basis, bulk purchasing of alcohol, and purchasing from more than one store to take advantage of low prices.

Findings

The study found that except for retailer price reductions, the association between Welsh university students' intentions to buy alcohol and their susceptibility to the remaining retailers' sales promotions was greater than that of university students in Australia and Germany, respectively. Significant differences between the countries were found in terms of the salience of perceived susceptibility to retail sales promotion strategies and their correlation with students' attitude towards alcohol consumption.

Originality/value

The paper's findings provide insights particularly for upstream, legislative strategic interventions to combat the issue of alcohol drinking of young female university students.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Biswajeet Pradhan, Mohd Dini Hairi Bin Suliman and Mohamad Arshad Bin Awang

In a tropical country like Malaysia, forest fire is a very common natural and man‐made disaster that prevails in the whole South East Asian region throughout the year…

Abstract

Purpose

In a tropical country like Malaysia, forest fire is a very common natural and man‐made disaster that prevails in the whole South East Asian region throughout the year. Recently, the haze problem in Malaysia has created a lot of awareness among the government and eco‐tourism sectors. Therefore, detection of the hotspot is very important to delineate the forest fire susceptibility mapping. In this study, remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS) have been used to evaluate forest fire susceptibility at Sungai Karang and Raja Muda Musa Forest Reserve, Selangor, Malaysia. Frequency ratio model has been applied for the delineation of forest fire mapping for the study area.

Design/methodology/approach

Forest fire locations were identified in the study area from historical hotspots data from year 2000 to 2005 using AVHRR NOAA 12 and NOAA 16 satellite images. Various other supported data such as soil map, topographic data, and agro climate were collected and created using GIS. These data were constructed into a spatial database using GIS. The factors that influence fire occurrence, such as fuel type and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI), were extracted from classified Landsat‐7 ETM imagery. Slope and aspect of topography were calculated from topographic database. Soil type was extracted from soil database and dry month code from agroclimate data. Forest fire susceptibility was analyzed using the forest fire occurrence factors by likelihood ratio method.

Findings

A new statistical method has been applied for the forest fire susceptibility mapping. The results of the analysis were verified using forest fire location data with the help of a newly written programming code. The validation results show satisfactory agreement between the susceptibility map and the existing data on forest fire location. The GIS was used to analyze the vast amount efficiently, and statistical programs were used to maintain the specificity and accuracy. The result can be used for early warning, fire suppression resources planning and allocation.

Originality/value

All data used in this study are original. The forest fire susceptibility mapping has been done in this study area for the first time. A new program has been coded to cross‐verify the susceptibility map. The results were also verified with field data and other supporting weather data.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article

Paul Sergius Koku and Selen Savas

This paper aims to examine the connection between restaurant tipping propensity and customers’ susceptibility to emotional contagion (EC) in an effort to shed more light…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the connection between restaurant tipping propensity and customers’ susceptibility to emotional contagion (EC) in an effort to shed more light on consumers’ inclination to pay more for a service than they are legally obligated to (that is to pay more than the price by tipping).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, two different instruments (Tipping Motivations Scale and Emotional Contagion Scale) were simultaneously administered online to restaurant patrons. The simultaneous administration of the instruments allows the researchers to capture not only tipping propensity but also the linkage between tipping propensity and customers’ susceptibility to EC.

Findings

The results show that customers’ susceptibility to EC, social compliance and server actions has the most effect on intention to tip in restaurants in Turkey. These findings support the notion that universal human characteristics such as the tendency to reciprocate (Hatfield et al., 1993) influence consumers’ propensity to tip regardless of the culture.

Research limitations/implications

While the results of this study offer some insight into why restaurant patrons tip, the fact that the study was carried out only in Turkey which has a collectivist culture limits the generalizability of the results to other societies that may be individualistic in orientation.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can be used by restaurant managers in training their employees and improving their customer patronage, particularly patronage from repeat customers. Similarly, the results could be used by restaurant servers to improve their income.

Social implications

The results of the study have potential to enhance the mutually beneficial relationship that should exist between restaurants and restaurant patrons. Indirectly, the results of the study could improve collective societal good.

Originality/value

This study, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, is one of the first to use the Tipping Motivations Scale (Whaley et al., 2014) in a different culture (Eurasia) and explain consumers’ tipping propensity explicitly using the concept of EC.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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