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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Abstract

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-592-4

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Christian Stoy and Susanne Kytzia

Nowadays, the so‐called management by objectives (MBO) is used as a management instrument of corporate real estate management (CREM), using cost targets as the yardstick…

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Abstract

Nowadays, the so‐called management by objectives (MBO) is used as a management instrument of corporate real estate management (CREM), using cost targets as the yardstick of CREM success. In Switzerland, CREM success is increasingly linked to cost reductions, with the cross‐company corporate strategy often requiring CREM to deliver a significant reduction in the level of cost. The cost concept used is material for the agreement or stipulation of cost targets. As the presented analysis shows, CREM has, for the most part, only very limited potential impact on costs. In particular, the use of the occupancy cost concept (sum of all imputed costs as well as costs recognised in the profit and loss account) poses a problem. This comprehensive cost type is determined by the following factors, which are in many cases outside the control of CREM: Book value as per balance sheet; Depreciation period of the basic shell structure; Main objective of the owner; Maintenance strategies; Degree of outsourcing of infrastructure management. Therefore, where the corporate strategy centres around cost reduction, CREM must be given the opportunity to control these drivers. This would require the inclusion of CREM in the development of the cross‐company corporate strategy, as otherwise the cost targets would have to be restricted to individual cost types (costs recognised in the profit and loss account). This is the only way to utilise a management instrument, such as MBO, within CREM.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Adriana Burgstaller, Bert Vercamer, Berta Ottiger-Arnold, Christian Mulle, Dominik Scherrer, Eyrún Eyþórsdóttir, Fabricia Manoel, Lisa Cohen, Matthias Müller, Monika Imhof, Myshelle Baeriswyl, Monwong Bhadharavit, Nozipho Tshabalala, Rachel Clark, Rorisang Tshabalala, Sherifa Fayez, Simone Inversini, Simon Papet, Susanne Reis, Takahiko Nomura and Tina Nielsen

Global collaboration, or the ability to collaborate with people different from ourselves or even across species, becomes increasingly important in our interconnected world…

Abstract

Global collaboration, or the ability to collaborate with people different from ourselves or even across species, becomes increasingly important in our interconnected world to engage constructively with and across difference. As we face more complex challenges, both locally and globally, the need for the creativity and innovation made possible by diverse perspectives is only amplified. Through five stories from our work as consultants and practitioners helping organizations to collaborate, we explore the role of global leadership in collaboration during times of crisis in various sectors. We began by asking ourselves a series of questions about global collaboration that could also serve as future research directions for scholars. We argue that new forms of leadership are required in the global context where both tasks and relationship domains are characterized by high complexity. We conclude by providing insights and recommendations for global leaders to address those complexities through collaboration and help their organizations learn from their experiences in crises and beyond.

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide for establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on existing theory on the subject of shared space as well as the practical experience of professionals within the fields of property management, space management and facilities management. The guide presented is the result of data collected through case studies, interviews, surveys and literature reviews. This knowledge is combined with data collected through a workshop with practitioners from municipalities and the private sector, to provide a final guide that is directly applicable as a tool for working with shared space as a part of a property management strategy.

Findings

The result presented is a guide to establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio, created in collaboration between researchers and practitioners. It provides an introduction to the topic and outlines a number of tasks that must be completed in different parts of a project, thereby providing a tool which practitioners can use to realise shared space as a strategy in the context of public real-estate management.

Originality/value

The guide presented is a first in connecting theory with practical application and through collaboration between researchers and practitioners, creating a tool to be used when working with shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Christian Stoy and Susanne Kytzia

This paper addresses the question as to what extent the outsourcing degrees of property management influence the operating costs of owner‐operated real estate. For this…

Abstract

This paper addresses the question as to what extent the outsourcing degrees of property management influence the operating costs of owner‐operated real estate. For this purpose, the outsourcing degrees of technical, infrastructural and commercial property management of over 100 Swiss office buildings were reviewed. In terms of costs, the administrative costs as well as the costs of utilities, waste disposal, cleaning, upkeep and maintenance were included. As the analysis of the data revealed, commercial property management primarily impacts on the administrative costs. The office buildings of the four project partners that were examined incurred higher costs when commercial property management was outsourced. Similarly, the costs of utilities and waste disposal are higher for real estate with outsourced infrastructural property management. An inverse relationship was identified in respect of the cleaning costs, where the costs are lower when outsourcing infrastructural property management. The impact of technical property management becomes apparent with regard to the maintenance costs, which are lower for real estate with outsourced technical property management. On balance, the situation appears to be rather heterogeneous, as outsourcing results in higher costs for some cost groups and in lower costs for others. The reasons offered for these differences go far beyond the actual functions being outsourced. For instance, the project partners involved believe that it is, in particular, low service levels and reduced maintenance strategies that go hand in hand with high degrees of outsourcing. Therefore, the interviews with real estate owners, and also the data collected, give rise to the assumption that outsourcing is a measure for the implementation of cost reduction strategies. However, this assumption requires verification by way of further exploration.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen, Per Anker Jensen, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Anders Højen Kristiansen

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and construction of sustainable facilities. Examples of current practices are studied to answer the following questions: Which initiatives to enable operational friendly and sustainable buildings are currently used by building clients in Denmark? Which initiatives could be appropriate to use in the future, and which parties are in the best position to implement the various initiatives?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a hermeneutic multi-method study, which consists of a review of former research, a case study and a survey. It starts with theoretical background based on earlier research with the aim to identify initiatives to ensure the use of operational knowledge in building design. Hereafter, the paper presents, analyses and discusses two studies: a case study of current practices at a university campus organisation and a survey of five swimming facilities. All cases are from Denmark.

Findings

In all, 31 initiatives to enable use of operational knowledge in building design were initially identified. In the case study, 11 additional initiatives were found. The case study and the survey of swimming facilities show different degrees of implementation, varying from 18 to 31 initiatives implemented. However, the studies show that introducing the initiatives is not sufficient; it takes deliberate actions to get the initiatives well implemented. Within the building client organisation, three main actors should care for implementing the initiatives: Top management, building client division and operation division.

Originality/value

Research-based literature on practices in relation to knowledge transfer from operation to design is limited. This paper provides insights into deliberate efforts on transferring knowledge from operation to design among Danish building clients.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Lika Rodin, Andre Rodin and Susanne Brunke

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of “Korta Vägen” (The short cut), a targeted language program for qualified migrants in Sweden, in self-maintaining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of “Korta Vägen” (The short cut), a targeted language program for qualified migrants in Sweden, in self-maintaining, well-being and perspectives for socio-economic integration for foreigners with academic diploma.

Design/methodology/approach

In-class observations, individual semi-structured interviews, focus-group interviews and written essays were used for data collection. A thematic analysis was applied as a method of data analysis. Amartya Sen’s capability approach constituted a theoretical framework of the research discussion.

Findings

Korta Vägen provides various resources for the participants, some of which (language training and internship) can become real advantages for employment. Others (IT, interview training and CV writing) are less translatable into concrete outcomes. The study suggests that satisfaction with the program is modulated by commitment to one’s professional identity, initial language proficiency, scope of cultural knowledge, the participants’ goals and the flexibility of the training offered. The acculturation frame of the program does not necessarily correspond with the objective need of many participants for quick entry into the labor market.

Originality/value

Insights into the social-psychological aspects of targeted language training as a measure for socio-economic integration can serve to enhance educational and institutional policies and professional practice.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Essays on Monsters and the Monstrous
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-027-7

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Susanne Balslev Nielsen, Anna-Liisa Sarasoja and Kirsten Ramskov Galamba

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop…

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Abstract

Purpose

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop solutions and make positive contributions on the organisational level and with societal-level effects. To base the emerging sub-discipline of sustainable facilities management (SFM) on research, an overview of current studies is needed. The purpose of this literature review is to provide exactly this overview.

Design/methodology/approach

This article identifies and examines current research studies on SFM through a comprehensive and systematic literature review. The literature review included screening of 85 identified scientific journals and almost 20,000 articles from the period of 2007-2012. Of the articles reviewed, 151 were identified as key articles and categorised according to topic.

Findings

The literature review indicated that the current research varies in focus, methodology and application of theory, and it was concluded that the current research primary addresses environmental sustainability, whereas the current research which takes an integrated strategic approach to SFM is limited. The article includes lists of reviewed journals and articles to support the further development of SFM in research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review includes literature from 2007 to 2012, to manage the analytical process within the project period. However, with the current categorisation and the access to the reviewed journals and articles, it is possible to continue with the latest literature.

Practical implications

The article provides an overview of theoretical and practical knowledge which can guide: how to document and measure the performance of building operations in terms of environmental, social and economical impacts? How to improve the sustainability performance of buildings? What are the potentials for and barriers to integrating sustainability into FM on strategic, tactical and operational levels?

Originality/value

The paper presents the most comprehensive literature study on SFM so far, and represents an important knowledge basis which is likely to become a key reference point for pioneers and scholars in the emerging sub-discipline of SFM.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Susanne Colenberg and Tuuli Jylhä

It is widely recognized that interior office space can affect health in several ways. Strategic and evidence-based design, including explicit design objectives…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is widely recognized that interior office space can affect health in several ways. Strategic and evidence-based design, including explicit design objectives, well-chosen design solutions and evaluation of results, aid realization of desired health effects. Therefore, this paper aims to identify possibly effective interior design strategies and accompanying design solutions and to provide examples of effectiveness measures.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature sample of 59 peer-reviewed papers published across disciplines was used to collect examples of workplace design features that have positively influenced workers’ well-being. The papers were grouped by their health objective and design scope successively and their theoretical assumptions, measures and findings were analyzed.

Findings

Four main workplace design strategies were identified. Design for comfort aims at reducing or preventing health complaints, discomfort and stress, following a pathogenic approach. It has the longest tradition and is the most frequently addressed in the included papers. The other three take a salutogenic approach, promoting health by increasing resources for coping with demands through positive design. Design for restoration supports physical and mental recovery through connections with nature. Design for social well-being facilitates social cohesion and feelings of belonging. Design for healthy behavior aims at nudging physical activity in the workplace.

Originality/value

By drawing complementary perspectives and offering examples of design solutions and effectiveness measures, this paper encourages workplace designers, managers and researchers to take a transdisciplinary and evidence-based approach to healthy workplaces. It also serves as a starting point for future empirical research.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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