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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen, Per Anker Jensen, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Anders Højen Kristiansen

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and construction of sustainable facilities. Examples of current practices are studied to answer the following questions: Which initiatives to enable operational friendly and sustainable buildings are currently used by building clients in Denmark? Which initiatives could be appropriate to use in the future, and which parties are in the best position to implement the various initiatives?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a hermeneutic multi-method study, which consists of a review of former research, a case study and a survey. It starts with theoretical background based on earlier research with the aim to identify initiatives to ensure the use of operational knowledge in building design. Hereafter, the paper presents, analyses and discusses two studies: a case study of current practices at a university campus organisation and a survey of five swimming facilities. All cases are from Denmark.

Findings

In all, 31 initiatives to enable use of operational knowledge in building design were initially identified. In the case study, 11 additional initiatives were found. The case study and the survey of swimming facilities show different degrees of implementation, varying from 18 to 31 initiatives implemented. However, the studies show that introducing the initiatives is not sufficient; it takes deliberate actions to get the initiatives well implemented. Within the building client organisation, three main actors should care for implementing the initiatives: Top management, building client division and operation division.

Originality/value

Research-based literature on practices in relation to knowledge transfer from operation to design is limited. This paper provides insights into deliberate efforts on transferring knowledge from operation to design among Danish building clients.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Kirsten Ramskov Galamba and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

Public facilities management (FM) is in the unique position of aligning building projects and FM with the policies of sustainable development at societal level. However…

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2697

Abstract

Purpose

Public facilities management (FM) is in the unique position of aligning building projects and FM with the policies of sustainable development at societal level. However, sustainable facilities management (SFM) is an emergent profession, and there is a need to build a code of conduct for SFM in FM organisations. The purpose is to develop and test a workshop based concept for collective building of capabilities targeting in-house FM organisations, in particular public in-house FM organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research explores the role of public facilities managers and examines how an empowerment process can help FM employees develop collective competences for SFM. The methodologies used are literature review, and a 3–year-long action research process in the Danish local authority, Albertslund, which is internationally recognised for its innovative and green profile.

Findings

This paper describes the phenomenon of public SFM imbedded in societal steering paradigms and suggests a framework for a sustainable FM code of conduct. The suggested “Next generation SFM code of conduct” support the employees in taking a proactive strategic position in which translation between politics, strategy, tactics and daily practice becomes the basis for prioritisation and decision-making. The capabilities needed is FM knowledge (including FM know-how, understanding of technologies for sustainability and public governance); it is the FM code of conduct, and it is control of own practice to be obtained through strategies and planning, collaboration and education.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on findings in a single local authority, why the findings are primary valid for concept development to be further developed and tested. However, the local authority of Albertslund is recognised as a front runner in green FM, why this case, compare to other cases, represents a relatively mature thinking in terms of FM contribution to sustainability at societal level. When this FM organisation express a need for developing collective competences for sustainability in FM, it can be assumed that less mature FM organisations needs it even more. The findings seem relevant beyond public FM organisations.

Practical implications

The produced framework for a sustainable FM code of conduct is useful for educational purposes as well as for strategic decision about FM organisations collective competence profile. The use of workshops for the building of collective competences might be useful for many other organisations and not only public FM organisations.

Social implications

Public FM organisations manage significant shares of existing buildings and can be a driver for societal change if they have the capabilities. This paper provides an answer to how these collective capabilities can be build within an organisational development process, through dialogue and collective reflections.

Originality/value

This paper is a pioneer in understanding the capabilities needed in FM organisations to take leadership in an integration of sustainability in FM processes.

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Rikke Brinkø

This study aims to investigate the attitude towards shared space in an urban context with a particular focus on meeting facilities. The Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the attitude towards shared space in an urban context with a particular focus on meeting facilities. The Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is used as a case, as this organisation has a vision of sharing facilities to stimulate regional development.

Design/methodology/approach

The attitude towards shared space in the Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is studied in a three-step qualitative research process. An initial survey investigated the City of Knowledge’s members’ attitude towards shared space in general, a workshop further explored motivations and practical needs and a second survey investigated the attitude towards shared meeting facilities. The Brinkø Typology of Shared Use of Space and Facilities is used as the theoretical framework for the study (Brinkø et al., 2015).

Findings

This study shows that the respondents are very positive towards the concept of shared space but more reluctant when it comes to sharing own facilities. A majority of the informants are often using externally owned facilities for meetings and events and prefer professional meeting facilities to schools, universities and sports facilities. This points to a need for developing relevant service concepts, if a shared space strategy with focus on meeting facilities were to be used to increase the use rate of existing buildings not already intended for this use.

Originality/value

This study adds to the so far limited amount of scientific knowledge on the topic of shared space, by investigating the attitude towards shared space among a specific group of people, in relation to the use of external meeting facilities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of designing new building complex(es) with a multifunction strategy. But the practicalities of realising shared space are generally overlooked, despite its importance for the user experience and the degree of success with shared space initiatives. The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge of shared space and the complex processes involved in realising multiple use of space.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the purpose stated, the paper presents a study of current literature and four cases of shared space, including a commercial building, a public sport facility, a public health centre and an educational building. The study draws on theory from the fields of property management, space management, urban design and architecture, as well as from the social sciences and geography, to provide an as complete picture as possible of the challenges related to shared spaces in practice.

Findings

The result of the study presented is increased knowledge of the processes involved in sharing space in a facilities management context, supported by specific recommendations regarding attention to issues of territoriality, involvement and practicalities.

Originality/value

Not much scientific work has been conducted on the topic of shared space in a facilities management context, and this study adds to the so far limited knowledge within the area.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide for establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on existing theory on the subject of shared space as well as the practical experience of professionals within the fields of property management, space management and facilities management. The guide presented is the result of data collected through case studies, interviews, surveys and literature reviews. This knowledge is combined with data collected through a workshop with practitioners from municipalities and the private sector, to provide a final guide that is directly applicable as a tool for working with shared space as a part of a property management strategy.

Findings

The result presented is a guide to establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio, created in collaboration between researchers and practitioners. It provides an introduction to the topic and outlines a number of tasks that must be completed in different parts of a project, thereby providing a tool which practitioners can use to realise shared space as a strategy in the context of public real-estate management.

Originality/value

The guide presented is a first in connecting theory with practical application and through collaboration between researchers and practitioners, creating a tool to be used when working with shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Susanne Balslev Nielsen, Anna-Liisa Sarasoja and Kirsten Ramskov Galamba

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop…

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3260

Abstract

Purpose

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop solutions and make positive contributions on the organisational level and with societal-level effects. To base the emerging sub-discipline of sustainable facilities management (SFM) on research, an overview of current studies is needed. The purpose of this literature review is to provide exactly this overview.

Design/methodology/approach

This article identifies and examines current research studies on SFM through a comprehensive and systematic literature review. The literature review included screening of 85 identified scientific journals and almost 20,000 articles from the period of 2007-2012. Of the articles reviewed, 151 were identified as key articles and categorised according to topic.

Findings

The literature review indicated that the current research varies in focus, methodology and application of theory, and it was concluded that the current research primary addresses environmental sustainability, whereas the current research which takes an integrated strategic approach to SFM is limited. The article includes lists of reviewed journals and articles to support the further development of SFM in research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review includes literature from 2007 to 2012, to manage the analytical process within the project period. However, with the current categorisation and the access to the reviewed journals and articles, it is possible to continue with the latest literature.

Practical implications

The article provides an overview of theoretical and practical knowledge which can guide: how to document and measure the performance of building operations in terms of environmental, social and economical impacts? How to improve the sustainability performance of buildings? What are the potentials for and barriers to integrating sustainability into FM on strategic, tactical and operational levels?

Originality/value

The paper presents the most comprehensive literature study on SFM so far, and represents an important knowledge basis which is likely to become a key reference point for pioneers and scholars in the emerging sub-discipline of SFM.

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Rimante Andrasiunaite Cox, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Carsten Rode

The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant repercussions beyond just resilience. The goal is to develop a decision support tool for facilities managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A risk framework is used to quantify both resilience and sustainability in monetary terms. The risk framework allows to couple resilience and sustainability, so that the provisioning of a particular building can be investigated with consideration of functional, environmental, economic and, possibly, social dimensions.

Findings

The method of coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability (CQRS) is illustrated with a simple example that highlights how very different conclusions can be drawn when considering only resilience or resilience and sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a hypothetical example. The example also illustrates the difficulty in deriving the costs and probabilities associated with particular indicators.

Practical implications

The method is generic, allowing the method to be customized for different user communities. Further research is needed to translate this theoretical framework to a practical tool for practitioners and to evaluate the CQRS method in practice.

Originality/value

The intention of this research is to fill the gap between the need for increasing sustainability and resilience of the built environment and the current practices in property maintenance and operation.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Morten Elle, Jesper Engelmark, Bo Jørgensen, Christian Koch, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Flemming Vestergaard

Presents the aims and needs of research in facilities management (FM) at the Section of Planning and Management of Building Processes at BYG(DTU. As the building stock in…

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686

Abstract

Presents the aims and needs of research in facilities management (FM) at the Section of Planning and Management of Building Processes at BYG(DTU. As the building stock in Denmark is rapidly increasing, socio‐demographic development implies profound changes in both the needs of inhabitants and the way that buildings are used, combined with an increased consciousness of sustainability. Buildings should be seen as long‐term “investments” while also keeping in mind the construction sector's need for increased productivity, long‐term product quality and enhanced value. This is the background for developing a research position. Identifies “the Scandinavian way” as using FM on a multi‐actor level, rather than just to serve the interests of a single organisation. The aim is to focus on small and medium‐sized enterprises, non‐profit associations and tenants, as well as the bodies administrating infrastructure within the mainstream FM field. There is an urgent need to address how society can best manage the growing (and decaying) building stock, to develop life‐cycle‐rooted infrastructure and building design, and finally allow buildings to be appropriated by their current and future users.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Giulia Nardelli, Jesper Ole Jensen and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

The purpose of this article is to investigate how facilities management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate how facilities management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A deductive research methodology was applied based on the first ten ESCO projects in Danish municipalities between 2008 and 2012.

Findings

A model of FM roles in FM public innovation is proposed. The internal FM unit coordinates between clients and end users by acting as translator and demonstrator and collaborates with the ESCO company to implement the energy renovation (FM processor).

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from a limited sample of ESCO collaborations in Denmark. Future research should thus investigate collaborative innovation in ESCO (and other forms of private–public) collaborations outside of Denmark.

Practical implications

Not only should FM units clarify what different stakeholders expect from an ESCO collaboration, but also they should translate stakeholders’ expectations into actual goals and objectives; process them together with the ESCO company; demonstrate their execution to all stakeholders throughout the process, not just when closing the collaboration.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to FM innovation research by exploring FM innovation in the public sector and by depicting the coordinating role of local governments’ internal FM units engaging in public–private collaborative innovation.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Per Anker Jensen, Theo van der Voordt, Christian Coenen, Daniel von Felten, Anna‐Liisa Lindholm, Susanne Balslev Nielsen, Chaiwat Riratanaphong and Mirjam Pfenninger

This article aims to present and compare research perspectives and theoretical reflections from a variety of academic fields on the concept of added value of facilities management.

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3816

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present and compare research perspectives and theoretical reflections from a variety of academic fields on the concept of added value of facilities management.

Design/methodology/approach

The starting point is the so‐called FM Value Map, which was presented in a recent article in Facilities by Per Anker Jensen in 2010. The article is a first result of the work in the EuroFM research collaboration group and is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of facilities management (FM), corporate real estate management and business‐to‐business marketing.

Findings

Good relationship management and building on trust is shown to be equally important as delivering the agreed services.

Originality/value

Usually the concept of added value is discussed from a monodisciplinary point‐of‐view. The different backgrounds of the authors add value to an increased understanding of the added value of FM by comparing and testing different ways of conceptualising this issue. This is of great importance to FM research and evidence‐based FM as a sound basis for the long‐term recognition of FM.

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