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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Piia Uusi-Kakkuri, Tiina Brandt and Susanna Kultalahti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what kind of leadership young innovative people prefer and whether their level of innovativeness has an influence on those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what kind of leadership young innovative people prefer and whether their level of innovativeness has an influence on those leadership preferences. It also asks specifically whether some leadership behaviours are preferred over others by young innovators, by comparing that group’s preferences to those of the majority of young people and an outlier group labelled laggards. Leadership preferences are studied in the context of transformational leadership covering transformational leadership, transactional leadership (including passive and active management by exception), rewarding, laissez-faire and authoritative leadership styles.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 297 Finnish university students completed a voluntary leadership behaviour questionnaire and an innovativeness scale. A non-parametric independent samples median test was run to determine if there were differences in the leadership preference score between the innovativeness level groups.

Findings

Results indicate that the level of innovativeness influences leadership preferences. Receiving intellectual stimulation from their leader is more important to young innovators than it is to their peers but the former are also less comfortable with active management by exception.

Originality/value

Young innovators leadership preferences have not been studied. Harnessing the full power of this important talent pool is central to the future competitiveness of organizations and nations. This study intends to prompt discussion and studies on how to lead young innovators given their preferences.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Riitta Viitala, Susanna Kultalahti and Hilpi Kangas

Recent academic discussion depicts leadership development (LD) as an important tool for supporting the implementation of an organization’s strategy, maintaining ongoing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent academic discussion depicts leadership development (LD) as an important tool for supporting the implementation of an organization’s strategy, maintaining ongoing development of the organization, and building capabilities that are essential for the future. However, the role of LD in reality depends to a considerable extent on how human resource (HR) managers and other top managers perceive LD and its importance. In this study, the purpose of this paper is to examine how LD manifests in HR managers’ and other top managers’ views on the future challenges of HRM. Accordingly, the authors reason what the findings indicate concerning the strategic role of LD in managers’ minds.

Design/methodology/approach

The topic was approached inductively. The qualitative data were collected from 473 Finnish HR managers and 276 other top managers, using a web-based brainstorming tool that adopted ideas from social media platforms. All of the informants are part of the top management team. The material was analysed using content analysis.

Findings

The findings were a cause for concern. They show that top managers do not very actively consider either leadership or LD when asked to consider the HR challenges of the future. In addition, when they did so, the ideas of LD were mostly traditional and individual-centred. Only a few of the informants connected LD to business needs. The comments mainly reflected ideas of heroic leadership and training.

Originality/value

The study advances the understanding of the perceptions of LD decision makers in organizations, but also suggests that more research on the topic is needed. In addition, the study shows that more discussion would be required between academics and managers to deepen the common view of the content, potential, and reality of LD.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Susanna Kultalahti and Riitta Viitala

The purpose of this qualitative paper is to seek more understanding of the elements important to the psychological contracts of working Millennials. The study also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative paper is to seek more understanding of the elements important to the psychological contracts of working Millennials. The study also presents the implications of those findings for human resource management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from Facebook using the method of empathy-based stories (MEBS). A sample of working Millennials describes the factors they saw as motivating and desirable in working life.

Findings

The findings are in line with previous quantitative studies in western countries, which reveal constant learning and developing at work; interesting, challenging, and varied tasks; social relations and the supervisor’s behaviour; reciprocal flexibility concerning timetables and working hours; and a good work-life balance to be important factors. However, the findings indicate that the desire to develop competences, and factors related to time may be even more significant for Millennials than previous literature on psychological contracts has suggested. Neither monetary issues nor a desire for long-term contracts emerged clearly as important factors from the material, showing that the manifestations of some elements that are important in the formulation of the psychological contract vary in different contexts.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that employing Millennials challenges HR professionals to develop HR practices that offer flexible time structures, systematic and individual development procedures, and a coaching form of leadership.

Originality/value

The paper exhibits a methodological innovation in using Facebook as a vehicle for data gathering. Additionally it applies the MEBS: a method still rare in research in the field of business.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Susanna Kultalahti and Riitta Liisa Viitala

The purpose of this paper is to examine some perceptions of Millennials concerning what makes work motivating, and discuss their implications for human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine some perceptions of Millennials concerning what makes work motivating, and discuss their implications for human resource management (HRM) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected via Facebook using the method of empathy-based stories (MEBS). The theoretical framework is grounded in the literature on motivation.

Findings

The full-time working Millennials wrote more about intrinsic motivators than extrinsic ones. Additionally, there were several dichotomies of positive and negative factors causing motivation/demotivation. Thus, the results contradict to some extent with the ones of Herzberg's. The stories revealed that the most important things having an effect on motivation were an interesting, varying and flexible job and good relationships with colleagues and supervisor.

Practical implications

The results revealed some particular factors that should be considered when designing HRM practices to dovetail with the motivational drivers of the Millennials: flexibility, work-life balance, convenient social relationships, need for coaching-based leadership and the opportunity to develop.

Social implications

Due to retirements and shrinking generations, the impact of Generation Y is increasing in the workforce. Thus, recognising its motivational factors is important.

Originality/value

The originality of the study partly rests in its methodological innovativeness. Often adopted by sociologists, this study introduces the method of MEBS to the business field. Furthermore, Facebook is still seldom used in data gathering. While much of the extant research on Generation Y is quantitative in nature, the adoption of a qualitative approach allows for the voice of Generation Y to be heard.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Findings show that top managers do not very actively consider either leadership or leadership development (LD) when asked to consider the HR challenges of the future. In addition, when they did so, the ideas of LD were mostly traditional and individual-centered. Only a few of the informants connected LD to business needs. The comments mainly reflected ideas of heroic leadership and training.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Carla C.J.M. Millar and Vicki Culpin

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update of the Special Issue's field of research, give the structure of the Special Issue and introduce the papers in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an update of the Special Issue's field of research, give the structure of the Special Issue and introduce the papers in the collection, including management issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the Call for Papers and further research and a presentation of papers in the Special Issue paying attention to original contribution, research and management recommendations.

Findings

This Special Issue is making a solid contribution to the field in not only addressing ageing and the ageing generation, but focusing strongly on the way both the ageing generation and other generations such as Gen Y and Gen X affect organisational dynamics, structure and career management.

Originality/value

Original research brought together in a multi-faceted way outlining the challenges as well as management agendas for the organisation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Lee Waller, Carla Millar and Vicki Culpin

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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