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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Vince Mills and Susan Whittaker

Aims to identify the reasons for the development of work based learning (WBL) in Higher Education, its relationship to government policy, and its impact on and perception…

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Aims to identify the reasons for the development of work based learning (WBL) in Higher Education, its relationship to government policy, and its impact on and perception by university managers, lecturers and academic‐related staff. Discussion of government policy and the factors influencing WBL development in Higher Education (HE) is contextualised by a case study of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). In seeking to ascertain if governmental policy is reflected in policy and practice at GCU, strategic managers’ perceptions of the influences on them in developing WBL and the role of supra‐institutional agencies in supporting WBL development were identified. The quality of institutional and supra‐institutional support in this area of curriculum development, as perceived by academic staff, was also explored. The paper concludes that congruence between government policy impetus, supra‐agency approaches, HEI strategies and institutional practice is questionable, and that there is a need for further research into the relationships between these.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Publication date: 9 May 2018

Susan Whittaker

Differences between UK countries in HE policy and provision concerning the accessibility of HE study for students, and the costs of that study, have implications for…

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Differences between UK countries in HE policy and provision concerning the accessibility of HE study for students, and the costs of that study, have implications for cross-border study mobility. Those qualified for and wishing to enter HE are affected both by financial support for students and the provision of the HE service in terms of the number of places and the shape and history of the sector within their home country, and in comparison to other countries of the UK. In addition, funding policies for mobile students do not recognise social diversity and so have an unequal impact on students in relation to their socio-economic resources, a consequence of the territorial frame of reference and unequal devolution arrangements which work against a UK-wide social citizenship. Drawing on a quantitative analysis of student data, this chapter discusses the unequal conditions of access, opportunity and financial support for HE across the UK and how this may have a negative impact on the role of cross-border mobility in widening participation.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Susan Whittaker

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Working with Older People, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Lucy Hunter Blackburn

This chapter considers how far political devolution has enabled the government in Wales to develop a distinctive approach to student funding. It examines in particular…

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This chapter considers how far political devolution has enabled the government in Wales to develop a distinctive approach to student funding. It examines in particular claims that policy choices in Wales on student funding reflect a commitment to ‘progressive universalism’, a term sometimes used by policy-makers in Wales and elsewhere to describe combining means-tested and non-means-tested benefits. The chapter also explores the growing use of income-contingent loans, arguing that such loans complicate debates about targeting and universalism.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Publication date: 9 May 2018

Sarah Minty

Young people’s choice of higher education institution and subject are often assumed to take place in a social vacuum, ignoring the influence of family and friends. Despite…

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Young people’s choice of higher education institution and subject are often assumed to take place in a social vacuum, ignoring the influence of family and friends. Despite a shift away from state funding of undergraduate higher education towards a cost-sharing model (Johnstone, 2004), little research has been carried out on family attitudes to debt, particularly in Scotland where home students do not pay tuition fees. This chapter explores how higher education decisions are made by Scottish domiciled students in the context of their families and the ways in which such decisions are mediated by social class.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Marie (Aurélie) Thériault

The Printemps Érable has become a landmark event in the history of Québec’s student movement. The Printemps Érable protesters expressed demands on several fronts…

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The Printemps Érable has become a landmark event in the history of Québec’s student movement. The Printemps Érable protesters expressed demands on several fronts, including the freezing of tuition fees, free education, the preservation of a just and universal student loans and bursaries programme, the right of access to higher education for all the province’s youth and freedom of association. The 2012 movement echoed protests in the 1950s. This chapter provides an overview of the history of student protest over fees and access to higher education in Québec and considers its implications for student struggles more widely. The Printemps Érable ultimately led to the freezing of tuition fees. It also ensured the preservation of the universal student loan and bursary programme, and reaffirmed the students’ right to free association. This chapter gives an historical overview of the student protest movement in Quebec, and ponders its impact on student struggles everywhere.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Publication date: 9 May 2018

Katy Vigurs, Steven Jones, Julia Everitt and Diane Harris

This chapter draws on findings from a comparative, qualitative research project investigating the decision-making of different groups of English higher education students…

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This chapter draws on findings from a comparative, qualitative research project investigating the decision-making of different groups of English higher education students in central England as they graduated from a Russell group university (46 interviewees) and a Post-92 university (28 interviewees). Half of the students graduated in 2014 (lower tuition fees regime) and the other half graduated in 2015 (higher tuition fees regime). The students interviewed were sampled by socio-economic background, gender, degree subject/discipline and secondary school type. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore students’ future plans and perceptions of their future job prospects. Despite higher debt levels, the 2015 sample of Russell Group graduates from lower socio-economic backgrounds had a positive view of their labour market prospects and a high proportion had achieved either a graduate job or a place on a postgraduate course prior to graduation. This group had saved money whilst studying. The 2015 sample of Post-1992 University graduates (from both lower and average socio-economic backgrounds) were worried about their level of debt, future finances and labour market prospects. This chapter raises questions about whether a fairer university finance system, involving lower levels of debt for graduates from less advantaged backgrounds, might avoid some graduates’ transitions to adulthood being so strongly influenced by financial anxieties.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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