Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Susan Warring

The aim of this case study was to investigate the extent of word‐of‐mouth influence amongst international students at a New Zealand tertiary institution and to review the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this case study was to investigate the extent of word‐of‐mouth influence amongst international students at a New Zealand tertiary institution and to review the literature for a valid and reliable conceptualisation and measurement of word‐of‐mouth.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature suggests that opinion‐leading and seeking scales form a valid and reliable conceptualisation and measurement of word‐of‐mouth. Using these scales, a comparison was made between international students and two groups employing the t‐test, domestic students and decision‐makers for online learning management systems. Analysis of variance was employed to investigate differences in word‐of‐mouth between students of different nationalities.

Findings

Indian students were more likely to give advice, but less likely to seek it, than Chinese students. Also, contrary to expectations, word‐of‐mouth influence was not higher for international than domestic students.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate the relationship between word‐of‐mouth and actual consumption decisions made by students. In addition, a random sample should be conducted with a wider sample frame of institutions so that findings can be generalised.

Practical implications

This study forms a foundation for future research investigating whether and how to harness the potential of word‐of‐mouth amongst different nationalities. For example, internet social networking tools could harness Indian students’ higher propensity to give advice and Chinese students’ higher propensity to seek it.

Originality/value

The development and refinement of opinion leadership scales over time is reviewed to suggest valid and reliable scales which can be adapted to specific contexts.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Susan Warring

This paper aims to analyse how learning levels differ within and between degrees and diplomas with specific application to the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies degree…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse how learning levels differ within and between degrees and diplomas with specific application to the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies degree and the New Zealand Diploma of Business, which are delivered at a New Zealand polytechnic.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and content analysis of National Qualifications Frameworks was conducted to analyse how learning levels differ within and between degrees and diplomas with specific application to the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies degree and the New Zealand Diploma of Business which are offered at a New Zealand polytechnic.

Findings

A literature review and content analysis of National Qualifications Frameworks reveals that learning levels are differentiated by level of complexity, degree of abstraction, depth in a major subject, research competency, learner autonomy and responsibility, relative demand placed on students and increasing complexity and unpredictability of operational context. This analysis failed to find any difference in learning level between Bachelor of Applied Business Studies and New Zealand Diploma of Business papers nominally at the same level on the New Zealand National Qualifications Framework. The degree comprises a portion of papers at a higher learning level than the diploma and it is at this level that the difference is realised.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate learning level differences between disciplines, qualifications and institutions.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework on which to base course design, delivery and assessment of the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies degree and the New Zealand Diploma of Business and credit transfer between them.

Originality/value

This case study addresses the increasingly important issue of the compatibility of learning levels between different qualifications. As many economies acknowledge the necessity for increasingly skilled workforces, credit transfer to enable seamless transfer between qualifications is becoming a focus in seeking to facilitate lifelong learning. There are few studies that focus on National Qualifications level descriptors and the implications for different qualification types.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Brian Roberts

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Racheal Harris

Abstract

Details

Photography and Death: Framing Death throughout History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-045-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

John Dalrymple

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds

Abstract

Details

The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality for Women an Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-602-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Marc von Boemcken

Only two days before the UN imposed a mandatory arms embargo on Eritrea and Ethiopia, the German Minister for Development, Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, issued a communiqu…

Abstract

Only two days before the UN imposed a mandatory arms embargo on Eritrea and Ethiopia, the German Minister for Development, Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, issued a communiqué wherein she described the ongoing absence of international export restrictions against the warring countries as nothing less than a “scandal” (Agence France Press, May 15, 2000). Indeed, the war between Eritrea and Ethiopia had pre-dated the embargo by two years.

Details

Putting Teeth in the Tiger: Improving the Effectiveness of Arms Embargoes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-202-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Danielle Sutton

Purpose – To explain the unswerving loyalty given to Charles Manson by his followers from a religious perspective by drawing on Durkheim’s (1912/1976) theory of religion…

Abstract

Purpose – To explain the unswerving loyalty given to Charles Manson by his followers from a religious perspective by drawing on Durkheim’s (1912/1976) theory of religion and Hall’s (2003, 2013) theory of religion and violence.

Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative analysis of archived multimedia either quoting, or written by, members of the Manson Family. Specifically, a theoretical thematic analysis is used to draw inferences on how members explained their participation in the 1969 murders.

Findings – The Manson Family display a unified belief system premised on the sacredness ascribed to Helter Skelter, forming a moral community at Spahn Ranch. Manson was conceived as the clan’s God, thereby meeting most of Durkheim’s requirements for a religious formation. A main component of their belief system was the inevitability of Helter Skelter, or the upcoming racial revolution; the ultimate war and end of the world. This belief provides one explanation for the Manson murders; that they were carried out as a religious duty to initiate Helter Skelter.

Originality/value – Despite the continued public fascination with the Manson murders, only a few studies have applied a sociotheoretical framework to explain this event and none have used a religious account from the perspective of those involved. By introducing religion as one plausible framework, this research is not only an extension of Durkheim’s work but also contributes to existing literature on the relationship between religion and violence.

Details

Homicide and Violent Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-876-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Randall S Schuler, Ibraiz Tarique and Susan E Jackson

The media often portray business organizations as warring enemies who define their own success by the demise of their competitors. Executives sometimes use similar imagery…

Abstract

The media often portray business organizations as warring enemies who define their own success by the demise of their competitors. Executives sometimes use similar imagery to motivate their “troops.” What such images ignore are the strong interdependencies among business organizations and the degree to which cooperation results in mutual gains. Just as nations have discovered the benefits of economic cooperation, businesses have learned that success often depends on forming strategic alliances.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-264-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Susan Auty and George Long

Analogies between internal and external service quality suggest that internal quality can be assessed without too much regard to differences between organizational…

Abstract

Analogies between internal and external service quality suggest that internal quality can be assessed without too much regard to differences between organizational customers and fee‐paying customers. Research into organizational networks, however, indicates the importance of environmental and atmospheric factors in exchange activities. In this paper we explore the gaps in service quality arising from the conflict between departmental and organizational loyalties. Using methods derived from the external model of service quality put forward by Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry, we consider the value of internal research into service quality and suggest that organizational power struggles and lack of communication lead to misunderstandings about the priorities and resources available for internal service exchanges. The greater empathy generated among the participating departments suggests that improvement can occur when there is closer interaction between “warring” but nevertheless dependent departments. Balanced against this is an overarching need for organizational goals to take precedence and for limited resources to be allocated according to the ultimate needs of the external customer.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000