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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Susan Simpson

Reviews the effects of the Food Safety Act 1990. A survey conductedin July/August 1991 found that food manufacturers appear to have apositive attitude based on the gradual…

Abstract

Reviews the effects of the Food Safety Act 1990. A survey conducted in July/August 1991 found that food manufacturers appear to have a positive attitude based on the gradual changes in food production, distribution and consumption, shopping habits and technology over the years. Innovations are being introduced in training, food safety and quality assurance policies, prompting increased awareness both company‐wide and amongst senior management.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Susan Simpson

Improved legislation controlling the major components of the foodchain cannot ensure that food leaving the food retailer will remain safeuntil it is consumed. Mishandling…

Abstract

Improved legislation controlling the major components of the food chain cannot ensure that food leaving the food retailer will remain safe until it is consumed. Mishandling of food in the home contributes to a significant number of food poisoning cases each year. A survey conducted in West Glamorgan in 1991 identified a lack of understanding by many respondents in several aspects of food safety and hygiene. Some weak points in knowledge relate to factors that have been acknowledged for many years, while others relate to the use of appliances in the kitchen and “new” food products. A multitude of educational material is available to the general public from many sources, but its effectiveness is questioned.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Ye In (Jane) Hwang, Natasha Ann Ginnivan, Paul Leslie Simpson, Susan Baidawi, Adrienne Withall, Brie Williams and Tony Butler

The purpose of this commentary is to draw upon available literature and practices related to COVID-19 and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to highlight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this commentary is to draw upon available literature and practices related to COVID-19 and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to highlight key matters for better risk management and care of this population during this and future infectious disease pan/epidemics.

Design/methodology/approach

The present commentary draws on current policies, practices and literature regarding the health, needs and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to discuss risk, care and early release for this population during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

Incarcerated persons experience poorer health and accelerated age-related decline compared to those in the general community. The present situation offers the opportunity to fill knowledge and practice gaps, including policies for staff training, identification of dementia and cognitive decline, assessment of mobility issues, addressing barriers to health-seeking, possibilities of medical or compassionate release, risk assessment and release protocols and post-release needs.

Practical implications

While Australian prisons have acknowledged the vulnerability of older persons, more focused adaptation of COVID-19-related policies to consider adults as young as 45 years are needed. Appropriate ethical identification and management of cases in this population is needed, as is discussion on issues of decarceration and medical release. Re-conceptualisation of incarcerated adults as “citizens in need of care”, rather than as “offenders to be secured”, will be beneficial. Robust, local evidence is needed to assist decision-making.

Originality/value

This is a comprehensive, focused review of relevant evidence, policies and practices for a growing subpopulation of prisoners worldwide with complex needs and particular vulnerability to the COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Khushboo Raina and Puja Khatri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the available literature on engagement of faculty members teaching in higher education institutions and present forth a strong…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the available literature on engagement of faculty members teaching in higher education institutions and present forth a strong foundation for researchers of the same area to gain insight into the available literature and prospects of faculty engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory study has been conducted using different keywords to draw a list of relevant research papers on Google Scholar and several online databases like Emerald Management, EBSCO Host, Elseiver, etc.

Findings

Various definitions of the major constructs have been captured from which dimensions have been explored. Identification of dimensions and factors has been done by performing extensive literature review. Studies so conducted on the major construct have been tabulated to present a comprehensive picture. Universities across the world have been studied to find out differences with respect to India in terms of their higher education system and practices related to faculty.

Originality/value

The paper is original and holds significance as not much literature is available on faculty engagement in published domain and higher education has become an area of keen interest in present times. This paper will give a strong foundation of literature to future researchers who want to pursue their studies in this area.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Peter McGough, Susan Kline and Louise Simpson

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose of this paper is to outline a successful population health and care management strategy depending on accountable teams to standard workflow and agreed upon process and outcome measures in order to achieve the triple aim of improved health, patient experience, and value.

Design/methodology/approach

Two major areas of focus for primary care are ensuring that all patients receive appropriate evidence-based screening and prevention services and coordinating the care of patients with chronic conditions. The former initiative will promote the general health and well-being of patients, while the latter is a key strategy for achieving better outcomes and reducing costs for patients with chronic conditions.

Findings

To achieve these goals while managing a busy practice requires that the authors leverage the PCP by engaging clinical and non-clinical team members in the care of their patient population. It is essential that each team member’s role be clearly defined and ensures they are working at the top of their scope.

Originality/value

This initiative was successful because of the compelling objectives, the buy-in generated by using Lean methodology and engaging the team in the design process, use of multiple feedback mechanisms including stories, dashboards, and patient feedback, and the positive impact on providers, staff, and patients.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Brian Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when engaged in by young people. The aim of this discussion is to better understand the extent to which those narratives recognise young people’s agency in relation to their sexuality and the role that new media plays in enabling youth to explore their sexual identity.

Methodology

The methodology employed is that of discourse analysis. This approach is used to deconstruct the dominant narrative of sexting contained in the literature, a narrative that constructs it as a problem to be contained and controlled, either through the application of the criminal law or through education and guidance approaches. This paper then investigates an emerging counter narrative that gives greater emphasis to the autonomy rights of youth. A case study involving a Parliamentary Inquiry in one Australian State into sexting is also employed to further this analysis.

Findings

This paper concludes that the dominant narrative remains the strongest influence in the shaping of law and the practice of sexting, but that young people may be better served by the counter narrative that recognises their agency in ways that may empower and grant them more control over their bodies.

Originality/Value

The paper thus provides an alternative approach to developing new law and policy with respect to the regulation of sexting by youth that should be of value to lawmakers and child and youth advocates.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Aurora Chen, Noeleen Doherty and Susan Vinnicombe

The purpose of this paper is to report a qualitative study with British women managers, which explored the career competencies accrued from undertaking an Executive MBA (EMBA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a qualitative study with British women managers, which explored the career competencies accrued from undertaking an Executive MBA (EMBA).

Design/methodology/approach

The research drew on in‐depth interviews with a sample of 18 female alumni from three British business schools. Data were analyzed using NVivo 8.0. within the career‐competencies framework of Knowing‐how, Knowing‐why and Knowing‐whom.

Findings

Women aged between 30 and 34 years emphasized the importance of gaining confidence (Knowing‐why) and skills (Knowing‐how) while those aged between 35 and 45 years focused on developing networks (Knowing‐whom). This study suggests that age and career stage may have considerable impact on perceptions of acquired career competencies.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory piece with limited generalisability; however, it exposes the need to clarify the concept of career stage for women.

Practical implications

Business schools have historically stressed the career benefits of MBA programmes in terms of improved capital and of changing career directions. This research indicates that an EMBA may offer a more level playing field for women with respect to networking activities. In the competitive global environment, business schools may benefit from more fully exploring career competencies, such as networking skills, for increasing the appeal of EMBA programmes. The paper also draws attention to the need for HR managers to increase efforts for improving women's career competencies.

Originality/value

Findings extend previous research on the development of career competencies from an EMBA, indicating the importance of developing networks, particularly at mid‐career. The paper highlights the need to redefine women's mid‐career stage.

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Pamela Hobbs

This paper seeks to explain the jury’s verdict of acquittal in the bizarre case of eccentric millionaire Robert Durst, who was charged with the murder of Morris Black…

Abstract

This paper seeks to explain the jury’s verdict of acquittal in the bizarre case of eccentric millionaire Robert Durst, who was charged with the murder of Morris Black after Black’s body parts were found floating in Galveston Bay off the coast of Texas. Though an analysis of a portion of the defense’ closing argument, this paper examines the Durst defense team’s strategy of directing the jury’s attention to a single event – the confrontation that resulted in Black’s death – in order to effect a shift in focus that allowed them to use “reasonable doubt” to leverage their argument that the prosecution had not met its burden of proof. This paper demonstrates how this strategy acted to construct the “unreasonable doubt” that resulted in the jury’s verdict.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

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