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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Susan Kemper Patrick, Laura K. Rogers, Ellen Goldring, Christine M. Neumerski and Viviane Robinson

Leadership coaching is an increasingly popular development tool for school principals. However, specific coaching behaviors are rarely conceptualized or examined in prior…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership coaching is an increasingly popular development tool for school principals. However, specific coaching behaviors are rarely conceptualized or examined in prior research. This study presents a coaching behavior framework and then analyzes actual coaching conversations between principals and coaches to illustrate how specific coaching behaviors create opportunities for principals to reflect and think critically about their leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on theories of interpersonal learning, the authors develop a framework of coaching behaviors to distinguish coaching inquiries and assertions that facilitate critique and reflection and, therefore, activate opportunities for learning. The authors use this framework to code transcripts of 55 principal coaching sessions. The authors analyze the prevalence of certain coaching behaviors and then examine qualitative patterns in how the use of certain behaviors shapes the nature of coaching conversations.

Findings

Only about one-third of coded coaching behaviors in the analytic sample are categorized as coaching inquiries and assertions that activate opportunities for learning. In the qualitative comparisons of extracts from coaching conversations, the authors find coaches' use of these behaviors produced richer, more meaningful dialogue.

Originality/value

Unlike much of the past research on leadership coaching, this analysis examines what happens in conversations between coaches and principals. This framework could be applied to a broad range of coaching programs intended to promote professional learning.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

William Fetsko

This chapter sets forth a plan designed to encourage and enable teachers to engage in first-person characterization in their classrooms. The author draws on his extensive…

Abstract

This chapter sets forth a plan designed to encourage and enable teachers to engage in first-person characterization in their classrooms. The author draws on his extensive background in social studies teaching, administration, and consulting to argue for the value of historical interpretation within the context of today's curricular emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This chapter then explores and explains historical interpretation from a classroom perspective, focusing on pedagogical best practices. In a first-person presentation, the presenter assumes the identity of a historical figure. The first question to be asked then is, Who is the individual I wish to represent, and why? This person should be selected from subject matter being studied in your class. Be aware that it is necessary to anticipate some element of controversy when you undertake this activity. With rare exceptions, any historical figure selected for portrayal will have something questionable in their background, and you will have to contend with this. So, the next question to ask is, Why engage in first-person interpretation in the first place? In this chapter, experienced teachers provide reasons for doing so, and consider necessary preparations for effectively implementing such a characterization. That discussion leads to examining ways to ensure successful presentations that achieve established lesson goals, followed by suggestions for debriefing and effectively bringing closure to the exercise. As the accompanying lesson extension demonstrates, a characterization can ground further study of an issue associated with the individual being depicted.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Ophelia Cheung and Susan Patrick

This paper discusses the implementation and delivery, at Ryerson University Library in Canada, of three consortially‐facilitated, user‐centered initiatives to enhance…

Abstract

This paper discusses the implementation and delivery, at Ryerson University Library in Canada, of three consortially‐facilitated, user‐centered initiatives to enhance traditional interlibrary loan services. Through a collaborative purchase of approximately 4,000 NetLibrary ebooks, with the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) consortium and the Consortium of Ontario Libraries, the Library provides unmediated access to shared monographs. Ryerson's fully‐subsidized document delivery service allows users to order journal articles directly from the Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI Source) database.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tony Wall

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639

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Martin Zimerman

The purpose of this paper is to show that digital natives are different from older age groups.

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3807

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that digital natives are different from older age groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The first survey asks questions about general computer searching behaviors. The second survey asks the students to find two items to see if they can find them.

Findings

Digital natives are different in their search behavior, preferring to use web‐based search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing.

Research limitations/implications

There are 120 respondents to the first survey and 27 in the second.

Practical implications

More focus needs to be placed on the digital natives' search habits to find out how best to serve this population.

Social implications

Unless digital natives are taught how to search academic databases, they will be done a great disservice.

Originality/value

The two surveys are unique in data content.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sarah Tudor and Ruth Helyer

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295

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Jane L. Ireland and Robert J. Cramer

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179

Abstract

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Mike McGrath

The consequences of electronic publishing continue to manifest themselves in the 110 journals scanned for this literature review. Pricing, access, e‐books and e‐journals…

Abstract

The consequences of electronic publishing continue to manifest themselves in the 110 journals scanned for this literature review. Pricing, access, e‐books and e‐journals are amongst the issues considered in this issue’s literature review. Further criticism of the publishing sector is identified and the potential for micro payments.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Humanizing Higher Education through Innovative Approaches for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-861-1

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