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Article
Publication date: 28 October 1995

Susan M. Petroshius, Stephen J. Newell and Steven J. Ross

The Hispanic population in the United States is rapidly increasing and is expected to be the largest minority group within the next decade. Consequently, a better…

Abstract

The Hispanic population in the United States is rapidly increasing and is expected to be the largest minority group within the next decade. Consequently, a better understanding of this group of consumers is of great importance to marketers. This study investigates the role that acculturation plays on a number of consumer‐related attitudes and behaviors. The results indicate that as acculturation increases, Hispanic consumers are more frequently exposed to English language media, use coupons with greater frequency, and display less loyalty to specific brands.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 1994

Bob T. Wu, Susan M. Petroshius, Kenneth E. Crocker and James S. West

The effects of the manipulation of a promised contribution to a university and the personalization of a cover letter on response rate, response speed, and response quality…

Abstract

The effects of the manipulation of a promised contribution to a university and the personalization of a cover letter on response rate, response speed, and response quality were examined using a commercial population. The results indicate that both the promised contribution to a university and personalization increased response rate and response speed of returns. The influence of the manipulated variables on response quality was mixed. Specifically, only personalization was shown to influence response completeness while neither variable influenced respondents’ willingness to respond to questions that could be regarded assensitive. The study also revealed slight evidence of method‐specific response bias.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Stephen J. Newell, Bob T. Wu, Philip A. Titus and Susan M. Petroshius

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: are sophisticated consumers more likely to be satisfied with their purchases? Are consumers who are more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: are sophisticated consumers more likely to be satisfied with their purchases? Are consumers who are more knowledgeable more apt to feel in control of their purchase decisions? Are they more likely to believe the transaction was fair? Are they less likely to have cognitive dissonance post‐purchase?

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study examining the role of consumer sophistication on consumers' purchase satisfaction was conducted with a national sample of approximately 700 home purchasers.

Findings

The results revealed that shopping sophistication is a key determinant of whether consumers are satisfied with their purchase experience. Sophistication not only seems to affect satisfaction but also customer perceptions of control, fairness and dissonance.

Practical implications

Implications for marketing strategy and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that perception of sophistication plays a much more important role in affecting consumer purchase satisfaction than previously understood. Consequently, businesses need to be much more active in educating consumers so that they are better able to make more informed purchase decisions. Ultimately, by helping to facilitate this information flow, consumers will be more satisfied with the products and services they purchase, develop a greater loyalty to the company providing the data and be more likely to purchase similar products and services in the future.

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Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Leland Campbell and William D. Diamond

Considers the differences between consumer perceptions ofnonmonetary promotions such as free extra product and monetarypromotions such as discounts and rebates. Reports on…

Abstract

Considers the differences between consumer perceptions of nonmonetary promotions such as free extra product and monetary promotions such as discounts and rebates. Reports on an experiment which found that monetary promotions did not have to be as large as nonmonetary promotions to be noticed by the consumer, and that large incentives make consumers sceptical. Concludes that the decision about which type of promotion to use depends on whether a price‐conscious or a premium product market segment is being sought.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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