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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Patti Geil and Susan Kingman

A summary of papers given at a recentconference on this topic

Abstract

A summary of papers given at a recent conference on this topic

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Kathleen W. Craver

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools…

Abstract

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools. These two laws, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Education For All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (known as Public Law 94–142), have required local public school agencies to provide new eductional programs for thousands of handicapped children not previously served by the public schools. Counselors, principals, and teachers were quickly informed of the law's requirements and willingly began the task of main‐streaming and assimilating these children into various curricula. Their physical needs were attended to rapidly; their societal and emotional needs, unfortunately, lagged behind. Within the past seven years, there has been an increase in books, articles, and films specifically addressed to counseling the handicapped. Unlike past literature which focused only on the vocational aspect of rehabilitation counseling, current writing emphasizes personal counseling meant to assist a disabled child to participate fully in the problems and joys of daily living.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Linda A. Catelli

Physical education, like most areas of education, is changing and taking on a new look for the 1980s. Physical educators, school administrators, and others making…

Abstract

Physical education, like most areas of education, is changing and taking on a new look for the 1980s. Physical educators, school administrators, and others making decisions about programs for children and young people are examining both current practices and forecasts for the future in this field. What they decide will profoundly affect the resources that should be a part of library collections for children and youth. Too often librarians and school media specialists have found it difficult to think about the kinds of materials appropriate for such collections because they do not have the knowledge necessary for sound selection. A major reason for this difficulty is that the area of physical education is usually separated from other subject areas in schools. Along with the industrial arts, domestic science, and the fine arts, physical education is categorized as a performative subject area. Classified as such, it is usually not thought of as something you ask young people to think about, talk about, or even read about; but rather, something you ask them to “do.” Yet, upon closer examination, there exists a small wealth of library materials for children.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Peter R. Senn

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the social question, die soziale Frage, is treated in the periodical literature of English language economics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the social question, die soziale Frage, is treated in the periodical literature of English language economics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines every reference to the question in the most important English language economic journals.

Findings

Considering that more than a century has passed, there are few references. By 1900, Anglophone economists virtually lost what little interest they ever had in the social question. Continental European economists have always made up the vast majority of those concerned with the social question. There has never been agreement about what the social question is or how to remedy it. It has always been defined very differently at different times and within and among countries. The political, social, economic and cultural contexts are important determinants of discussions about it and policies to address the social problems to which it refers. In order for a social question to be translated into social reform, specific parts of it must become social problems. Political, cultural and social changes in Europe require entire new ways of thinking about social reform. Reasons for this are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into how the social question is treated in English language periodicals.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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