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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Jim Bueermann, Justin H. Escamilla and Susan M. Hartnett

The National Police Research Platform provided unprecedented data about police performance, but what did the agency heads think of this research program and the results…

Abstract

Purpose

The National Police Research Platform provided unprecedented data about police performance, but what did the agency heads think of this research program and the results? How useful were the findings for police practice and what more is needed? The purpose of this paper is to answer these questions and explore ways to translate the findings and sustain the Platform in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Chiefs and sheriffs from the 100 participating agencies were invited by e-mail to take an online feedback survey about their experiences with the Platform. Data from 64 agencies were analyzed.

Findings

The majority of chief executive officers rated their overall experience with the Platform as positive, found the results useful and reported that the findings caused them to make changes, rethink things, and identify unforeseen issues. Most of them also expressed a willingness to participate in future Platform initiatives, but many felt additional guidance would help with interpreting findings and identifying next steps. This paper discusses how the Platform can respond to feedback and continue advancing the science of policing. Mainly, this can be achieved by engaging key organizations and providing routine feedback and education to participating agencies and the field at large.

Originality/value

This paper addresses previously unanswered questions about the utility and future of the National Police Research Platform from a police management perspective. It includes a preliminary discussion about how to sustain the Platform and ensure that research findings are translated into practice.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Gail Dantzker, Arthur J. Lurigio, Susan Hartnett, Sheila Houmes, Sigurlina Davidsdottir and Kristen Donovan

This article presents the findings of a process evaluation of training for Chicago’s Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS), which is the city’s version of community…

Abstract

This article presents the findings of a process evaluation of training for Chicago’s Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS), which is the city’s version of community policing. The study’s approach and instrumentation were adopted from the field of adult education and involved observation and ratings of trainee and trainer behaviors. Two types of training were observed: orientation and skills building. Also, personal interviews were conducted with sergeants, lieutenants, and sworn trainers. The trainers overall were enthusiastic and knowledgeable but did not make adequate techniques to draw participants into the learning process. The article concludes with recommendations on how to implement training for community policing.

Details

Police Studies: Intnl Review of Police Development, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0141-2949

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Dennis P. Rosenbaum

Abstract

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Susan S. Fiorito, Larry C. Giunipero and He Yan

Quick response (QR) systems are being implemented by retail firms at an ever quickening pace throughout the USA. While dramatic changes occur throughout the retail company…

Abstract

Quick response (QR) systems are being implemented by retail firms at an ever quickening pace throughout the USA. While dramatic changes occur throughout the retail company adopting QR strategies, it is the buyers and buyers’ assistants that are more affected by these changes than other executives in the retail firm. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions, attitudes and opinions of retail buyers toward QR. Over 200 buyers from leading department and specialty store firms that have implemented, or are beginning to implement, QR participated. In general, the findings indicated that buyers had a positive view of QR systems; felt QR would save them time but not reduce the number of buyers currently employed; and that they used technology as an integral part of their job. The study also found several significant factors describing buyers’ perceptions of QR that were related to the size of their organization.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2021

Rebecca M. Teasdale

Evaluation of public library makerspaces traditionally examines achievement of library goals, which reflect leaders’ and funders’ values. Understanding makers’ experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluation of public library makerspaces traditionally examines achievement of library goals, which reflect leaders’ and funders’ values. Understanding makers’ experiences and perspectives may help evaluators frame their inquiry to reflect community values, test assumptions about makers and support democratic and equity-focused aims. This paper aims to inform how evaluations of public library makerspaces are framed to address the experiences, values and visions for success of adult women, a group that is often marginalized in making and makerspaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by democratic approaches to evaluation and activity theory, this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with women makers engaged with digital fabrication in public library makerspaces.

Findings

The women in the sample leveraged digital fabrication to deepen existing creative practices, challenging gendered distinctions between crafting and technology. They directed making toward economic survival and thriving, including creative-sector entrepreneurship. Making was also directed toward strengthening families and communities, centering relationships beyond the makerspace. Learning emerged as a byproduct of engagement, organized to produce specific artifacts. Library resources, arrangements and rules supported women with varying technology skills and also constrained some making activities.

Practical implications

Findings suggest evaluators should resist deficit framing of women and making; broaden science, technology, engineering and mathematics-focused definitions of making; focus on the personally meaningful ends to which making is directed; expand conceptualizations of community; examine arrangements and resources that mediate making and learning; and center the perspectives of local women makers.

Originality/value

This paper presents an empirical account of makers who are often marginalized and identifies six implications for evaluations of public library makerspaces.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Angel Clemons and Claudene Sproles

This paper seeks to highlight the benefits of using depository exchange lists as collection development tools.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight the benefits of using depository exchange lists as collection development tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide a general overview of depository collection development and analyze exchange list activity at the national and local level.

Findings

Although exchange lists are widely available electronically, only a small portion of depository libraries actually use them as found in the analysis of exchange list activity at the national level. Many unique and out of print documents are regularly being offered on the lists.

Originality/value

This paper provides information on an area of government documents and collection development librarianship that is not widely covered in the literature. It highlights the use of exchange lists as a way to increase collections at a relatively low cost.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Susan S. Fiorito, Eleanor G. May and Katherine Straughn

Defines and discusses quick response (QR), with its relationship tovendor partnering, short‐cycle manufacturing, demand‐flow manufacturing,“virtual integration”…

Abstract

Defines and discusses quick response (QR), with its relationship to vendor partnering, short‐cycle manufacturing, demand‐flow manufacturing, “virtual integration”, re‐engineering, just‐in‐time and efficient consumer response as an introduction to the results of a study on which firms are implementing QR and at what stage they are regarding their implementation strategy. The results of the study show that 73 per cent of the responding retailers claimed to be implementing some phase of QR. Implementation is slow, however, with only two of 15 QR components reported to be as much as half‐implemented among the retail respondents.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Caroline Hamilton-McKenna and Theresa Rogers

In an era when engagement in public spaces and places is increasingly regulated and constrained, we argue for the use of literary analytic tools to enable younger…

Abstract

Purpose

In an era when engagement in public spaces and places is increasingly regulated and constrained, we argue for the use of literary analytic tools to enable younger generations to critically examine and reenvision everyday spatialities (Rogers, 2016; Rogers et al., 2015). The purpose of this paper is to consider how spatial analyses of contemporary young adult literature enrich interrogations of the spaces and places youth must navigate, and the consequences of participation for different bodies across those spheres.

Design/methodology/approach

In a graduate seminar of teachers and writers, we examined literary texts through a combined framework of feminist cultural geography, mobilities and critical mobilities studies. In this paper, we interweave our own spatial analyses of two selected works of young adult fiction with the reflections of our graduate student participants to explore our spatial framework and its potential to enhance critical approaches to literature instruction.

Findings

We argue that spatial literary analysis may equip teachers and students with tools to critically examine the spaces and places of everyday life and creatively reenvision what it means to be an engaged citizen in uncertain and troubling times.

Originality/value

While we have engaged in this work for several years, we found that in light of the global pandemic, coupled with the recent antiracist demonstrations, a spatial approach to literary study emerges as a potentially even more relevant and powerful component of literature instruction.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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