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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Latisha Reynolds, Samantha McClellan, Susan Finley, George Martinez and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015.

Findings

This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2002

Abstract

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-851-4

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Jess Moriarty and Susan Diab

Higher Education (HE) is spinning. The systematic erosion of our academic freedom, (Docherty, 2012) means that the authors of this chapter no longer know how to navigate…

Abstract

Higher Education (HE) is spinning. The systematic erosion of our academic freedom, (Docherty, 2012) means that the authors of this chapter no longer know how to navigate what is on the horizon. The neoliberal agenda now driving HE is threatening how we work via, ‘a quiet ruination and decay of academic freedom’ (Docherty, 2012, p. 47). This chapter offers an autoethnography of a collaborative creative project that engaged the authors in dialogues about the effects of neoliberalism on how they teach, work, live and where they compare working in HE to hula-hooping as both demand relentless movement and activity to prevent everything from collapsing. Our story offers ideas for valuing time and space in our academic lives that are playful, creative, bonding, and suggest that by mastering hula-hooping, we have enjoyed a renewed sense of confidence with academic work and academic life.

We employ a range of styles of writing that seek to engage the reader with reflection on their own experiences. Guiding questions for any reader might be, but are by no means restricted to:

What are the effects of neoliberalism on how we work?

How much time do we give for creative play and risk-taking?

What creative methods can we adopt and develop in order to preserve our academic freedom?

How can we navigate the HE landscape effectively without succumbing to neoliberal pressures and shifts?

How can we value human experiences in academic work and in academic life?

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2005

Mysoon Rizk

More reverberant today than ever, given the current legal and political climate, artist David Wojnarowicz's victorious lawsuit in 1990 against evangelist Donald Wildmon's…

Abstract

More reverberant today than ever, given the current legal and political climate, artist David Wojnarowicz's victorious lawsuit in 1990 against evangelist Donald Wildmon's American Family Association tangled with still relevant contexts: plight of the NEA, disastrous AIDS pandemic, and continuous church/state involvement in public debate over social values, including individual rights to sexual representation and artistic expression. Yet strangely, the artist remains largely absent from both “culture wars” narratives and the general record. Increasing his visibility and arguing his significance, this essay re-inserts Wojnarowicz into history, his work profoundly challenging what he called “the illusion of the ONE TRIBE NATION.”

Details

Crime and Punishment: Perspectives from the Humanities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-245-0

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Dr Susan Cartwright

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Susan M. Benbow and Paul Kingston

The purpose of this paper is to look at concerns about risk/abuse expressed spontaneously by people with dementia (PwD) and their carers in narratives describing their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at concerns about risk/abuse expressed spontaneously by people with dementia (PwD) and their carers in narratives describing their journeys with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 35 narratives were elicited from PwD, carers of PwD and couples where one partner was living with dementia as part of a study on the impact of producing narratives on PwD and their carers. Participants were found to allude to risk/abuse, or specifically mention thoughts on risk and abuse in their narratives. A secondary analysis of the theme of risk/abuse is reported here.

Findings

Concerns about risk/exploitation were often expressed in the narratives, and covered a range of areas including driving, safety in the home, safety outdoors, falls, finances, risk to PwD from others, risk to others from PwD, potential or actual police incidents and neglect.

Research limitations/implications

The narratives were elicited as part of another project and participants were not asked directly about risk; themes reported here were brought up spontaneously by participants.

Practical implications

In relation to dementia a wide range of risk/abuse issues is of concern to PwD and their carers, including driving and financial vulnerabilities. PwD and carers are prepared to talk about risk/abuse when given an opportunity. It is important to investigate and understand experiences and concerns about risk/abuse if they are to be addressed in health and social care practice.

Originality/value

The narratives offer unique insights into the concerns of PwD and family carers.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Susan L. Porter and Marcia L. Pentz

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue by sharing reflections on and best practices derived from the successful five-year iteration of a semester-long, hybrid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue by sharing reflections on and best practices derived from the successful five-year iteration of a semester-long, hybrid, international accounting course which centers on a short-term cultural immersion component in Ireland. The course provides students with an opportunity to learn about international business and to learn about the importance of tolerance and finding common ground with people.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion of the process the course designer used to combine traditional technical content with a “liberal arts,” soft-skills content and places both firmly within the international cultural context of a short-term, study abroad experience. The paper includes insight into how the authors choose a country to visit, develop international academic partners, administer an international case competition and assess student performance throughout the course.

Findings

The paper identifies practices that were successful and implementation of changes over time for course improvement.

Originality/value

This describes a unique approach to incorporating a hybrid-based course that was developed to embrace cultural differences while maintaining high expectations for understanding and application of technical accounting material.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2018

Douglas NeJaime

This chapter uncovers the destabilizing and transformative dimensions of a legal process commonly described as assimilation. Lawyers working on behalf of a marginalized…

Abstract

This chapter uncovers the destabilizing and transformative dimensions of a legal process commonly described as assimilation. Lawyers working on behalf of a marginalized group often argue that the group merits inclusion in dominant institutions, and they do so by casting the group as like the majority. Scholars have criticized claims of this kind for affirming the status quo and muting significant differences of the excluded group. Yet, this chapter shows how these claims may also disrupt the status quo, transform dominant institutions, and convert distinctive features of the excluded group into more widely shared legal norms. This dynamic is observed in the context of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights, and specifically through attention to three phases of LGBT advocacy: (1) claims to parental recognition of unmarried same-sex parents, (2) claims to marriage, and (3) claims regarding the consequences of marriage for same-sex parents. The analysis shows how claims that appeared assimilationist – demanding inclusion in marriage and parenthood by arguing that same-sex couples are similarly situated to their different-sex counterparts – subtly challenged and reshaped legal norms governing parenthood, including marital parenthood. While this chapter focuses on LGBT claims, it uncovers a dynamic that may exist in other settings.

Details

Special Issue: Law and the Imagining of Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-030-7

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Janne Tienari, Susan Meriläinen, Charlotte Holgersson and Regine Bendl

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which gender is “done” in executive search. The authors uncover how the ideal candidate for top management is defined…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which gender is “done” in executive search. The authors uncover how the ideal candidate for top management is defined in and through search practices, and discuss how and why women are excluded in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on in‐depth interviews with male and female Austrian, Finnish and Swedish executive search consultants. The authors study the ways in which consultants talk about their work, assignments, clients, and candidates, and discern from their talk descriptions of practices where male dominance in top management is reinforced.

Findings

The ways in which gender is “done” and women are excluded from top management are similar across socio‐cultural contexts. In different societal conditions and culturally laden forms, search consultants, candidates and clients engage in similar practices that produce a similar outcome. Core practices of executive search constrain consultants in their efforts to introduce female candidates to the process and to increase the number of women in top management.

Research limitations/implications

The study is exploratory in that it paves the way for more refined understandings of the ways in which gender plays a role in professional services in general and in practices of executive search in particular.

Practical implications

Unmasking how gender is woven into the executive search process may provide openings for “doing” gender differently, both for consultants and their clients. It may serve as a catalyst for change in widening the talent pool for top management.

Originality/value

Research on gendered practices in executive search is extremely rare. The study provides new insights into this influential professional practice and its outcomes.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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